Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

FW: LVT

Expand Messages
  • Wetzel Dave
    Any advice how I can answer this problem? I m arranging to meet her in the New Year. Dave Dave Wetzel, Vice-Chair, TfL 020 7126 4200 ... From: Glynis Johnston
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 8, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Message
      Any advice how I can answer this problem?
       
      I'm arranging to meet her in the New Year.
       
       

      Dave

       

      Dave Wetzel,

      Vice-Chair, TfL

      020 7126 4200

       

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Glynis Johnston [mailto:glynis@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2006 1:27 PM
      To: Wetzel Dave
      Subject: LVT

      Dear Mr Wetzel,

       

       

      I am writing to you because of your interest in promoting Land Value Tax.

      At the moment I am completing a report which was funded by the ICE R&D Enabling Fund (Project 0325) under the title “Case studies on the impact of new transport infrastructure on local urban communities with particular emphasis on the cultural heritage and historic environment”. 

       

      The motivation behind the research described in this report arose from a visit that I made to the Canada Water Estate shortly after the opening of the Jubilee Line extension.  My conversation with local residents in the area have suggested that, even at such an early stage of its operation, the Jubilee Line Extension was giving rise to social displacement due to the dramatic increase in property values.

       

      It has been suggested that Land Value Tax may discourage the increase in land values.  I can see that LVT would discourage the sort of speculative hype that occurred in Docklands where developments where demolished almost before they were finished because something more profitable came along.  LVT would also discourage the practice of holding on to a vacant site - waiting for land values to increase.  However, I am not sure how it would help prevent the kind of gentrification and displacement that occurs when land values increase because of the creation of new infrastructure.  I would be very grateful for your comments.

       

       

      Yours sincerely,

       

      Glynis Johnston

       



      ***********************************************************************************
      The contents of the e-mail and any transmitted files are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Transport for London hereby exclude any warranty and any liability as to the quality or accuracy of the contents of this email and any attached transmitted files. If you are not the intended recipient be advised that you have received this email in error and that any use, dissemination, forwarding, printing or copying of this email is strictly prohibited.

      If you have received this email in error please notify postmaster@....

      This footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept for the presence of computer viruses.
      ***********************************************************************************
    • Wyn Achenbaum
      Dave Well, she s probably right about land values -- but lvt can help keep down land prices to a manageable level, so that the price of entry is affordable.
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 8, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Dave

        Well, she's probably right about land values -- but lvt can help keep down land prices to a manageable level, so that the price of entry is affordable.

        Will some who live there now find it appropriate to move from their current quarters there? Yes, possibly.  And of course moving is extremely inconvenient and life-disrupting.   But if they are tenants, their landlord, and all the other landlords in the neighborhood, are going to be motivated to create new buildings that wil provide space not just for her, but for many new neighbors, some of whom who will be her customers (assuming we're talking commercial property, not just residential), and others who will be her suppliers (commercial, residential), and still others whose presence will cause more business to pass by her door and window (commercial).

        If they are themselves landholders, their lives will also be disrupted by this.   The market will call for their single-story or two-story building to be replaced by a mid-rise or high-rise building, which will be a royal pain for the current happy owner-occupant.  This will be a disruption, as they decide whether to farm that project out, or do it themselves.  And moving out for a while until demolition and construction is complete.  But upon completion, they will return to a new business place with new neighbors -- many more of them, and all the benefits that I described in the preceding paragraph.

        It will not cause all landholders to act simultaneously.  The tenants of the first ones to act will face fewer options than all who follow.  But the incentives that act on each landholder will cause him to create options for all tenants -- residential and commercial -- that will make a much better city for all the current tenants, and for the future generations of tenants, commercial and residential.

        Wyn

        Wyn

        Wetzel Dave wrote:

        Any advice how I can answer this problem?
         
        I'm arranging to meet her in the New Year.
         
         

        Dave

         

        Dave Wetzel,

        Vice-Chair, TfL

        020 7126 4200

         

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Glynis Johnston [mailto:glynis@ beamingmail. com]
        Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2006 1:27 PM
        To: Wetzel Dave
        Subject: LVT

        Dear Mr Wetzel,

         

         

        I am writing to you because of your interest in promoting Land Value Tax.

        At the moment I am completing a report which was funded by the ICE R&D Enabling Fund (Project 0325) under the title “Case studies on the impact of new transport infrastructure on local urban communities with particular emphasis on the cultural heritage and historic environment”. 

         

        The motivation behind the research described in this report arose from a visit that I made to the Canada Water Estate shortly after the opening of the Jubilee Line extension.  My conversation with local residents in the area have suggested that, even at such an early stage of its operation, the Jubilee Line Extension was giving rise to social displacement due to the dramatic increase in property values.

         

        It has been suggested that Land Value Tax may discourage the increase in land values.  I can see that LVT would discourage the sort of speculative hype that occurred in Docklands where developments where demolished almost before they were finished because something more profitable came along.  LVT would also discourage the practice of holding on to a vacant site - waiting for land values to increase.  However, I am not sure how it would help prevent the kind of gentrification and displacement that occurs when land values increase because of the creation of new infrastructure.  I would be very grateful for your comments.

         

         

        Yours sincerely,

         

        Glynis Johnston

         







        _,_._,___
        -- 
        Wyn Achenbaum
        webster, http://www.wealthandwant.com ... toward abolishing poverty
      • Jeffery J. Smith
        ... Another need for a dividend. Also, it ll generate jobs for the poor slobs, so they ll have more money for pricier sites. Also, the broader the area where
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 9, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          On Dec 8, 2006, at 11:43 AM, Wetzel Dave wrote:

          > Any advice how I can answer this problem?
          >> I am not sure how it would help prevent the kind of gentrification
          >> and displacement that occurs when land values increase because of the
          >> creation of new infrastructure.  I would be very grateful for your
          >> comments.

          Another need for a dividend.

          Also, it'll generate jobs for the poor slobs, so they'll have more
          money for pricier sites.

          Also, the broader the area where you use LVT, the greater the number of
          desirable sites, and the less the cost of any one particular prime
          site.

          SMITH, Jeffery J.
          President, Forum on Geonomics
          jjs@...; www.geonomics.org
          Share Earth's worth to prosper and conserve.
        • Paul Metz
          On Dec 8, 2006, at 11:43 AM, Wetzel Dave wrote: Any advice how I can answer this problem? I am not sure how it would help prevent the kind of gentrification
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
          • 0 Attachment


             
            On Dec 8, 2006, at 11:43 AM, Wetzel Dave wrote:

            Any advice how I can answer this problem?
            I am not sure how it would help prevent the kind of gentrification and displacement that occurs when land values increase because of the creation of new infrastructure.  I would be very grateful for your comments.
            SMITH, Jeffery J.  answered:  
            Another need for a dividend.

            Also, it'll generate jobs for the poor slobs, so they'll have more money for pricier sites.

            Also, the broader the area where you use LVT, the greater the number of desirable sites, and the less the cost of any one particular prime site.


             Paul Metz adds a question: 
             
            Who can calculate or estimate what nett effect LVT would have on a pensioner living in an old, small appartment on a first rate location:
            - without any recycling of the LVT-revenues to citizens income
            - with the Dividend 100% paying-out the revenue - equally to all citizens.
             
            For such inhabitants the new job opportunities in a revitalised place have no/very limited value.
            -----------------
             
          • Jeffery J. Smith
            ... Good points. But his family and friends and neighbors and co-believers who re still working will have higher wages and can more easily help him out. SMITH,
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              On Dec 12, 2006, at 11:28 AM, Paul Metz wrote:
              >  
              > Who can calculate or estimate what nett effect LVT would have on a
              > pensioner living in an old, small appartment on a first rate location:
              > - without any recycling of the LVT-revenues to citizens income
              > - with the Dividend 100% paying-out the revenue - equally to all
              > citizens.
              >  
              > For such inhabitants the new job opportunities in a revitalised place
              > have no/very limited value.

              Good points. But his family and friends and neighbors and co-believers
              who're still working will have higher wages and can more easily help
              him out.

              SMITH, Jeffery J.
              President, Forum on Geonomics
              jjs@...; www.geonomics.org
              Share Earth's worth to prosper and conserve.
            • Wetzel Dave
              See item 7 You might want to add comments on Land Value Tax at http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/prem_sikka_/2008/04/the_twelve-step_programme.html Dave Dave
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 21, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Re: Company Auditors: Watchdogs or Lapdogs

                See item 7

                You might want to add comments on Land Value Tax at

                 

                http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/prem_sikka_/2008/04/the_twelve-step_programme.html

                 

                Dave

                Dave Wetzel

                President, the Labour Land Campaign
                Tel: 020 7126 4200

                www.Labour Land.org

                 

                 

                ***********************************************************************************

                The contents of the e-mail and any transmitted files are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Transport for London hereby exclude any warranty and any liability as to the quality or accuracy of the contents of this email and any attached transmitted files. If you are not the intended recipient be advised that you have received this email in error and that any use, dissemination, forwarding, printing or copying of this email is strictly prohibited., If you have received this email in error please notify postmaster@...., This email has been sent from Transport for London, or from one of the companies within its control within the meaning of Part V of the Local Government and Housing Act 1989. Further details about TfL and its subsidiary companies can be found at http://www.tfl.gov.uk/ourcompany, This footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept for the presence of computer viruses.

                ***********************************************************************************

                 

              • Dan Sullivan
                ... Here is what I posted: The most obvious short-term step is getting out of wars in the Middle East, but the most important long-term step is to replace
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 21, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 21 Apr 2008 at 15:55, Wetzel Dave wrote:

                  > See item 7
                  >
                  > You might want to add comments on Land Value Tax at

                  > http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/prem_sikka_/2008/04/the_twelve-step_programme.html

                  Here is what I posted:

                  The most obvious short-term step is getting out of wars in the Middle
                  East, but the most important long-term step is to replace income taxes
                  with land value taxes, perhaps with a per capita dividend.

                  Even without the dividend, LVT would benefit all renters, who are the
                  poorest category of citizens, because it encourages speculators to put
                  land on the market and thereby lowers rents. It is also the only broad-
                  based tax that stimulates economic growth rather than retarding it.

                  This tax has always been opposed by special interests, but it has been
                  supported by statesmen and philosophers from across the political
                  spectrum throughout Britain's history. A brief list includes William
                  Blackstone, Thomas Carlyle, Winston Churchill, Richard Cobden,
                  William Godwin, Aldous Huxley, Samuel Johnson, John Locke,
                  David Lloyd-George, John Stuart Mill, Thorold Rogers, Bertrand
                  Russell, Adam Smith, 1st Viscount Philip Snowden and Herbert
                  Spencer.

                  The arguments in favor of land value tax are too great for the length of
                  this post, so I merely list these endorsements to show the depth and
                  variety of its support so people will not dismiss it. (A much larger and
                  more impressive list would include famous people from around the
                  world, but the list of English supporters is plenty long enough.

                  Another major improvement would be for the Bank of England to
                  issue all new currency as appropriate either through spending or per
                  capita grants, and to stop lending it to banks so the banks can lend it
                  to the people.

                  People who produce the wealth money can buy are what gives money
                  its value. This is expressed in the aphorism that inflation is "too much
                  money chasing too few goods." It is the people who are taxed for
                  creating those goods, and new money should at least reduce those
                  taxes. Banks should have to borrow money from the people, rather
                  than people having to borrow their rightful share of money from
                  banks. Banking privilege is also an ancient struggle with an array of
                  statesmen on one side and privilege on the other.

                  Take these steps and you needn't have an income tax at all.

                  There is plenty of information on these reforms at the earthsharing
                  savingcommunities and American Monetary Institute websites.

                  *** end of post ***
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.