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Re: Special Economic Zones

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  • k_r_johansen
    Perhaps you ve seen this before, but anyway this is interestig with regards to the tax-free zones issue:
    Message 1 of 6 , May 23, 2013
      Perhaps you've seen this before, but anyway this is interestig with regards to the "tax-free zones" issue:
      http://www.landvaluetax.org/theory/enterprise-zones-a-giveaway-to-landlords-official.html

      "A Report by Cambridge Econometrics for HM Treasury and HM Revenue and Customs concluded that 100% of the benefits from NNDR relief are passed into rents and therefore accrue to landlords, although the range of uncertainty surrounding this statistical estimate puts the boundary at somewhere between 65% and 150%. Either way, the general conclusion is that the majority of tax-saving benefits from NNDR exemption on EZs accrued to landlords rather than to tenants."

      Kj

      --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, Scott Baker <ssbaker305@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ugh, almost exactly the wrong approach.
      > I left the following comment (http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20130522/ECONOMY/130529946):
      >
      > Removing sales taxes is a good idea, especially as they hit the poor and working classes disproportionately, but removing property taxes is exactly the wrong approach.� It encourages land speculation/hoarding, puts profits in their pockets, and deprives the state of both revenues and new buildings.� What the Governor ought to do is untax the building portion of the property tax, and then increase the tax on land to make up for it in a revenue-neutral way.� This will encourage the most efficient use of land, encourage development.� The Land Value Tax has been tested and proven for over 100 years, going back to Henry George.
      > See my editorial in the Empire Page "We Need a Land Value Tax, Not a Property Tax Cap," here: http://www.empirepage.com/2013/3/3/we-need-a-land-value-tax-not-a-property-tax-cap.%c3%af%c2%bf%c2%bd But, don't take my word for it.� Listen to 25-year Mayor Steven Reed of Harrisburg of Pennsylvania giving the closing speech at the Council of Georgist Organizations last summer: https://vimeo.com/48735884 (start about 8 minutes in).� Harrisburg has a 6:1 Land/Building ratio tax.� Reed says "The Land Value Tax works, and works, without exception to grow and produce the kinds of beneficial effects..."� He also says there is zero administrative cost.
      >
      > �
      > Scott Baker - President: Common Ground - NYC; NY State Coordinator: Public Banking Institute; Opednews Blogger/Senior Editor; Huffington Post Blogger; Author
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Billy Fitzgerald <billyfitzgerald@...>
      > To: Joshua Vincent <joshua@...>; Scott Baker <ssbaker305@...>; Andrew Mazzone <andrwmazz@...>; Allen Smith <allen@...>; Anthony Persaud <anthony.persaud@...>; Thomas Ballou <tballou@...>; Marcello Ritondo <mritondo123@...>; Bill Batt <hwbatt@...>; Edward Dodson <ejdodson@...>; Fryda Ossias <flossias@...>
      > Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2013 9:21 AM
      > Subject: Special Economic Zones
      >
      >
      >
      > Gov. Andrew Cuomo unveiled the first of a series of planned initiatives to create tax-free zones across the state. The proposal, expected to pass this session, would treat areas around each of the 64 State University of New York campuses as neighborhoods where businesses would not have to pay sales or property taxes. [Crain's New York Business]
      > �
      > 5/23/13
      >
    • roy_langston
      ... Another demonstration of Langston s Law: No government is ever so poor or broke that it won t increase the welfare subsidy giveaway to landowners. -- Roy
      Message 2 of 6 , May 23, 2013
        --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, Scott Baker <ssbaker305@...> wrote:

        > Gov. Andrew Cuomo unveiled the first of a series of planned initiatives to create tax-free zones across the state. The proposal, expected to pass this session, would treat areas around each of the 64 State University of New York campuses as neighborhoods where businesses would not have to pay sales or property taxes. [Crain's New York Business]

        Another demonstration of Langston's Law: "No government is ever so poor or broke that it won't increase the welfare subsidy giveaway to landowners."

        -- Roy Langston
      • derekrss
        Ah, you beat me to it, Kj. This experiment has been tried before during the 1980s in the UK. We know the outcome and it was bad: an abysmal failure in fact. As
        Message 3 of 6 , May 23, 2013
          Ah, you beat me to it, Kj.

          This experiment has been tried before during the 1980s in the UK. We know the outcome and it was bad: an abysmal failure in fact. As described in the study which Kj mentions.

          But the good news is that an experiment has also been performed in setting up a Special Economic Zone based on the Single tax. The Jiaozhou_Bay colony. We know the outcome and it was good: an outstanding success in fact. As described by Wikipedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiaozhou_Bay and in more detail at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1536-7150.1984.tb02240.x/abstract


          Cheers

          Derek

          --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, "k_r_johansen" <kjetil.r.johansen@...> wrote:
          >
          > Perhaps you've seen this before, but anyway this is interesting with regards to the "tax-free zones" issue:
          > http://www.landvaluetax.org/theory/enterprise-zones-a-giveaway-to-landlords-official.html
          >
          > "A Report by Cambridge Econometrics for HM Treasury and HM Revenue and Customs concluded that 100% of the benefits from NNDR relief are passed into rents and therefore accrue to landlords, although the range of uncertainty surrounding this statistical estimate puts the boundary at somewhere between 65% and 150%. Either way, the general conclusion is that the majority of tax-saving benefits from NNDR exemption on EZs accrued to landlords rather than to tenants."
          >
          > Kj
          >
          > --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, Scott Baker <ssbaker305@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Ugh, almost exactly the wrong approach.
          > > I left the following comment (http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20130522/ECONOMY/130529946):
          > >
          > > Removing sales taxes is a good idea, especially as they hit the poor and working classes disproportionately, but removing property taxes is exactly the wrong approach.� It encourages land speculation/hoarding, puts profits in their pockets, and deprives the state of both revenues and new buildings.� What the Governor ought to do is untax the building portion of the property tax, and then increase the tax on land to make up for it in a revenue-neutral way.� This will encourage the most efficient use of land, encourage development.� The Land Value Tax has been tested and proven for over 100 years, going back to Henry George.
          > > See my editorial in the Empire Page "We Need a Land Value Tax, Not a Property Tax Cap," here: http://www.empirepage.com/2013/3/3/we-need-a-land-value-tax-not-a-property-tax-cap.%c3%af%c2%bf%c2%bd But, don't take my word for it.� Listen to 25-year Mayor Steven Reed of Harrisburg of Pennsylvania giving the closing speech at the Council of Georgist Organizations last summer: https://vimeo.com/48735884 (start about 8 minutes in).� Harrisburg has a 6:1 Land/Building ratio tax.� Reed says "The Land Value Tax works, and works, without exception to grow and produce the kinds of beneficial effects..."� He also says there is zero administrative cost.
          > >
          > > �
          > > Scott Baker - President: Common Ground - NYC; NY State Coordinator: Public Banking Institute; Opednews Blogger/Senior Editor; Huffington Post Blogger; Author
          > >
          > > ________________________________
          > > From: Billy Fitzgerald <billyfitzgerald@>
          > > To: Joshua Vincent <joshua@>; Scott Baker <ssbaker305@>; Andrew Mazzone <andrwmazz@>; Allen Smith <allen@>; Anthony Persaud <anthony.persaud@>; Thomas Ballou <tballou@>; Marcello Ritondo <mritondo123@>; Bill Batt <hwbatt@>; Edward Dodson <ejdodson@>; Fryda Ossias <flossias@>
          > > Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2013 9:21 AM
          > > Subject: Special Economic Zones
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Gov. Andrew Cuomo unveiled the first of a series of planned initiatives to create tax-free zones across the state. The proposal, expected to pass this session, would treat areas around each of the 64 State University of New York campuses as neighborhoods where businesses would not have to pay sales or property taxes. [Crain's New York Business]
          > > �
          > > 5/23/13
          > >
          >
        • Joshua Vincent
          Roy, do I have your permission to *steal* this wonderful jab for current use in New York State blogs and commentaries? Joshua Vincent, Executive Director
          Message 4 of 6 , May 24, 2013
            Roy, do I have your permission to steal this wonderful jab for current use in New York State blogs and commentaries?  

            Joshua Vincent, Executive Director
            Center for the Study of Economics
            413 South 10th Street
            Philadelphia, PA 19147
            215.923.7800 Extension 1 



            The Center for the Study of Economics is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit educational foundation. 
            Our mission is to research land value taxation, to assist governments in implementation and to study the effect of land based property taxation where used. We suggest implementation where appropriate but do not support political candidates or become involved in the electoral process.


            On Thu, May 23, 2013 at 10:04 PM, roy_langston <roy_langston@...> wrote:
             

            --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, Scott Baker <ssbaker305@...> wrote:

            > Gov. Andrew Cuomo unveiled the first of a series of planned initiatives to create tax-free zones across the state. The proposal, expected to pass this session, would treat areas around each of the 64 State University of New York campuses as neighborhoods where businesses would not have to pay sales or property taxes. [Crain's New York Business]

            Another demonstration of Langston's Law: "No government is ever so poor or broke that it won't increase the welfare subsidy giveaway to landowners."

            -- Roy Langston


          • roy_langston
            ... All LandCafe members are invited to steal all my wonderful jabs at landowning, intellectual property monopolies, private banks issuance of debt money,
            Message 5 of 6 , May 25, 2013
              --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, Joshua Vincent <joshua@...> wrote:

              > Roy, do I have your permission to *steal* this wonderful jab for current use in New York State blogs and commentaries?

              All LandCafe members are invited to steal all my wonderful jabs at landowning, intellectual property monopolies, private banks' issuance of debt money, professional association and labor union monopolies, taxi medallions, and all other forms of privilege.

              -- Roy Langston
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