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Re: [LandCafe] Re: Marx, Engel and Morris on George

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  • Harry Pollard
    Nevertheless, John. it has been used to demonstrate good English writing by university English classes, Complain to them, not me. I found it good reading, in
    Message 1 of 87 , Dec 25, 2012
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      Nevertheless, John. it has been used to demonstrate good English writing by university English classes, Complain to them, not me.

      I found it good reading, in spite of the 165 word sentences.

      Which reminds me. When Lawrence Olivier got his lifetime achievement Oscar, he made a several minute response without a full stop (or period).

      The response was full of appropriate clauses, cadences, vocal variations and was positively brilliant. The television cameras went to John Voight (no mean actor himself) in the front row and he was staring with his mouth wide open obviously amazed at the cleverness of Olivier's remarks. I think that George was similarly clever in his use of clauses in long sentences. 

      However, I suppose the short sentence is now the thing, which may or may not be an improvement.

      Harry

      ********************
      The Alumni Group 
      The Henry George School
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      Tujunga   CA   90243
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      On Tue, Dec 25, 2012 at 4:51 PM, John <burns-john@...> wrote:
       

      -- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, Harry Pollard <harrypollard0@...> wrote:

      > (Recall that Progress & Poverty has been
      > used as an example of good writing
      > in University English classes.)

      Harry, the original P&P was awful to read as it was written in convoluted Victorian English, which most cannot understand these days.

      Winston Churchill wrote very simple English that was designed for most people to understand. A friend of mine has a degree in English Lit. His writing is full of words most people do not know the meaning of.


    • Harry Pollard
      It all depends on what you are writing and who will be the reader. Unfortunately, modern schooling isn t great at producing readers so material must be made
      Message 87 of 87 , Dec 30, 2012
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        It all depends on what you are writing and who will be the reader.

        Unfortunately, modern schooling isn't great at producing readers so material must be made simple for them. Which point doesn't throw out other writing which may be more complicated as it conveys more subtle directions..

        Harry


        ********************
        The Alumni Group 
        The Henry George School
        of Los Angeles
        Tujunga   CA   90243
        (818) 352-4141
        ********************


        On Sun, Dec 30, 2012 at 6:55 AM, John <burns-john@...> wrote:
         

        --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, Harry Pollard <harrypollard0@...> wrote:
        >
        > However, I suppose the short sentence is now
        > the thing, which may or may not be an improvement.

        Harry, tabloid newspapers use short sentences. People are familiar with that. So, you have to write to what they can easily understand. If they have to do double-takes they lose interest. It is that simple. Churchill realised that a long time ago. His books on WW2 and super easy to understand. The proof readers would highlight parts of the book(s) and he would override them. In the end they thanked him for teaching them how to write simple English.


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