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Re: overpopulation

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  • Wetzel Dave
    I agree with the need for better controls to protect fish and the sea environment Kevin. I m not a fish expert but I do know that if the community charges for
    Message 1 of 1 , May 21 10:07 PM
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      Re: overpopulation

      I agree with the need for better controls to protect fish and the sea environment Kevin. I'm not a fish expert but I do know that if the community charges for a scarce resource then people use it better.
      This is true of road space, land and fish in the sea.
      Consider how many fish are killed in the catch and thrown back into the sea because, unlike cod, they are not fashionable to eat.
      Hopefully, someone in the land cafe, better informed than me, will be able to discuss this more helpfully.
      Best Wishes,
      Dave

      Dave Wetzel
      Vice-Chair TfL
      Tel: 020 7126 4200
      --------------------------
      Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Kevin Moore <kevin_enviro@...>
      To: Wetzel Dave <Davewetzel@...>
      CC: Bryanpepperell@... <Bryanpepperell@...>
      Sent: Sun May 21 21:13:37 2006
      Subject: Re: overpopulation

      Dave, I must strongly disagree. Fish are being exterminated because people catch them for other people tor eat. If the population of the world were say only 500 million humans, the oceans would still be teeming with fish, just as they were 200 years ago.

      The other factor in the extermination of fish is the availability of cheap fuel.  Fishing has become an industrialised extraction process in which technology makes the playing field extremely unlevel.  Take away deisel engines, fish finders and massive trawl nets, then the fish would stand a lot better change of survival, just as tropical forests would if there were no chainsaws or logging trucks.

      The good news is that fishing fleets here in NZ are thinking twice about heading out to sea, as the cost of fuel has escalated and the chances fo finding fish has diminished.

      Fishing quotas are a form of rent; they have to be bought in this part of the world. But the quotas have been set too high and rogue operators do their best to circumvent the rules. It's the same on the beaches of NZ nowadays.  Shellfish species that were common just 30 years ago are being annihilated, as organised gangs strip everything in sight, to send to Asia. This is not a racist statement, but the problem has increased markedly since the population (especially of Auckland) has grown rapidly, due to a massive influx of unscrupulous Asians, many of who see a resource as there for the taking.

      Regards

      Kevin






              ________________________________

              From: "Wetzel Dave" <Davewetzel@...>
              To: <kevin_enviro@...>, <henrygeorgeschool@...>
              Subject: Re: overpopulation
              Date: Sun, 21 May 2006 10:37:46 +0100
             
             

              Kevin,
              Overpopulation is not the cause of declining fish stocks.
              We should limit fishing and  charge the economic rent for the right to fish.
             
              Best Wishes,
              Dave
             
              Dave Wetzel
              Vice-Chair TfL
              Tel: 020 7126 4200
              --------------------------
              Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
              
             
              -----Original Message-----
              From: Kevin Moore <kevin_enviro@...>
              To: henrygeorgeschool@... <henrygeorgeschool@...>
              CC: Wetzel Dave <Davewetzel@...>
              Sent: Sun May 21 02:24:30 2006
              Subject: overpopulation
             
              Unfortunately, this is fairly typical of real news, Harry. The cost of overpopulation by humans is annihilation of the greater part of the rest of animal kingdom.
             
              Regards
             
              Kevin
             
              The Independent UK
             
             
             
              Deep-sea fish 'plundered' to extinction by trawling
             
             
              By Ian Herbert
             
             
              Published: 20 May 2006
             
             
              Fish stocks in international waters are being plundered to the point of extinction because governments are failing to protect them, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has warned.
             
              Species including tuna and the orange roughy are among those under threat by illegal fishing and the notorious practice of bottom-trawling, by which heavy rollers are dragged over the ocean floor, trapping fish and mammals and destroying entire ecosystems.
             
              The most imperilled species are within international waters, which account for more than half the world's surface. Many governments are ignoring controls on them and allowing pirate fishing vessels to operate unchecked, said Simon Cripps of WWF's marine programme.
             
              Countries such as Australia, Britain and Canada should be taking more responsibility, setting examples and putting pressure on other states, he said.
             
              The WWF report, co-written with the wildlife trade monitoring network Traffic, was released before a meeting next week in New York in which governments will review the UN Fish Stocks Agreement, the legal framework for managing fish populations in the high seas.
             
              The environmental devastation being caused by a global fishing industry whose catch has risen from 18 million tons to 95 million tons over the past half-century, has left 25 per cent of commercial species over-exploited and depleted, compared with 10 per cent in the mid-1970s, according to the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation.
             
              The WWF, based in Switzerland, found that some of the regional fisheries management organisations (RFMOs), whose task it is to ensure waters are not overfished, lacked the "political will and commercial motivation" to enforce fishing limits.
             
              Some regional agreements, such as the Antarctic Convention, do protect fish stocks, concluded the WWF. But some signatories to a North Atlantic agreement are ignoring fishing quotas altogether.
             
              Canada, for example, is committed to protecting stocks in its own national waters but allows over-fishing on the Grand Banks, off its east coast, because they fall within international waters where vessels from other nations are at work. This is causing huge declines in cod stocks, devastating the income of coastal communities.
             
              Some countries seem oblivious to the environmental damage being caused. The coastal states of East Africa are not part of their own region's RFMO - the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission - despite catching large amounts of tuna. Several East African states are being used as trans-shipment ports for illegally-caught toothfish, but do not seem aware of the illegality.
             
              Graphic evidence of the consequences of such systemic failures arrived from Rome yesterday where, at the start of the commercial fishing season for the Mediterranean bluefin tuna, the Tuna Trap Producers Association (TTPA) said that their industry was on the verge of collapse.
             
              Catches by the traditional tuna-trap fishermen in southern Spain are down 80 per cent on this time last year, according to the TTPA.
             
              The WWF said the root of this crisis lay with one of the RFMOs whose role is examined in the report - the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), which was allowing an increase in the Mediterranean tuna farming capacity, taking the total authorised capacity to 51,012 tons, some 20,000 tons higher than a previously imposed limit.
             
              The report's authors called on the UN to review fishing on the high seas, and strengthen the resolve of RFMOs to deal with states that flout agreements.
             
              "It's got to stop, we've got to do it quickly," Mr Cripps said. "There is hope, if we can get management put in place."
             
              Fish stocks in international waters are being plundered to the point of extinction because governments are failing to protect them, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has warned.
             
              Species including tuna and the orange roughy are among those under threat by illegal fishing and the notorious practice of bottom-trawling, by which heavy rollers are dragged over the ocean floor, trapping fish and mammals and destroying entire ecosystems.
             
              The most imperilled species are within international waters, which account for more than half the world's surface. Many governments are ignoring controls on them and allowing pirate fishing vessels to operate unchecked, said Simon Cripps of WWF's marine programme.
             
              Countries such as Australia, Britain and Canada should be taking more responsibility, setting examples and putting pressure on other states, he said.
             
              The WWF report, co-written with the wildlife trade monitoring network Traffic, was released before a meeting next week in New York in which governments will review the UN Fish Stocks Agreement, the legal framework for managing fish populations in the high seas.
             
              The environmental devastation being caused by a global fishing industry whose catch has risen from 18 million tons to 95 million tons over the past half-century, has left 25 per cent of commercial species over-exploited and depleted, compared with 10 per cent in the mid-1970s, according to the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation.
             
              The WWF, based in Switzerland, found that some of the regional fisheries management organisations (RFMOs), whose task it is to ensure waters are not overfished, lacked the "political will and commercial motivation" to enforce fishing limits.
             
              Some regional agreements, such as the Antarctic Convention, do protect fish stocks, concluded the WWF. But some signatories to a North Atlantic agreement are ignoring fishing quotas altogether.
             
              Canada, for example, is committed to protecting stocks in its own national waters but allows over-fishing on the Grand Banks, off its east coast, because they fall within international waters where vessels from other nations are at work. This is causing huge declines in cod stocks, devastating the income of coastal communities.
             
              Some countries seem oblivious to the environmental damage being caused. The coastal states of East Africa are not part of their own region's RFMO - the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission - despite catching large amounts of tuna. Several East African states are being used as trans-shipment ports for illegally-caught toothfish, but do not seem aware of the illegality.
             
              Graphic evidence of the consequences of such systemic failures arrived from Rome yesterday where, at the start of the commercial fishing season for the Mediterranean bluefin tuna, the Tuna Trap Producers Association (TTPA) said that their industry was on the verge of collapse.
             
              Catches by the traditional tuna-trap fishermen in southern Spain are down 80 per cent on this time last year, according to the TTPA.
             
              The WWF said the root of this crisis lay with one of the RFMOs whose role is examined in the report - the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), which was allowing an increase in the Mediterranean tuna farming capacity, taking the total authorised capacity to 51,012 tons, some 20,000 tons higher than a previously imposed limit.
             
              The report's authors called on the UN to review fishing on the high seas, and strengthen the resolve of RFMOs to deal with states that flout agreements.
             
              "It's got to stop, we've got to do it quickly," Mr Cripps said. "There is hope, if we can get management put in place."
             
             
             
             
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