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Bastiat's Broken-Window Error.

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  • DanS
    Bastiat is big with the Austrian School of Economics and with conservatives and neolibertarians. This is an analysis of why his Broken Window Fallacy does
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 29, 2011
      Bastiat is big with the Austrian School of Economics and with conservatives and neolibertarians. This is an analysis of why his "Broken Window Fallacy" does not hold true.

      It can help geolibertarians deal with right-wing neolibertarians.

      http://www.savingcommunities.org/econ/brokenwindow.html

      -ds
    • walto
      ... That s an interesting perspective. Do you think that a more mainstream Keynesian type might just chalk up the window as a stimulus that results in money
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 30, 2011
        --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, "DanS" <director@...> wrote:
        >
        > Bastiat is big with the Austrian School of Economics and with conservatives and neolibertarians. This is an analysis of why his "Broken Window Fallacy" does not hold true.
        >
        > It can help geolibertarians deal with right-wing neolibertarians.
        >
        > http://www.savingcommunities.org/econ/brokenwindow.html
        >
        > -ds
        >

        That's an interesting perspective. Do you think that a more mainstream Keynesian type might just chalk up the window as a "stimulus" that results in money circulating that might otherwise be saved? Such an analysis is along the same lines as yours, but doesn't require any assertions about rents, serfs, etc.

        W
      • Edward Dodson
        We are, I am convinced, running out of time to bring about real change in how our planet is occupied and its life-supporting systems treated. Society after
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 30, 2011
          We are, I am convinced, running out of time to bring about real change in
          how our planet is occupied and its life-supporting systems treated. Society
          after society seems on the verge of implosion. In the face of dire
          environmental challenges, we are wasting much of the planet's resources on
          militarism. We excel at the art of killing.

          The core moral principle I (and, I assume, most others who subscribe to the
          LandCafe) embrace is that the earth is the birthright of all persons
          equally. The extension of this principle is that no individual or group of
          persons has a greater claim to a specific part of the earth than any other
          individual or group. At best, the nation-state provides an administrative
          framework for the enforcement of just law. In too many instances, however,
          the nation-state merely establishes the police powers to enforce systems of
          privilege and oppression.

          One might have expected (certainly hoped) that by the 21st century much of
          the conflict between groups would have subsided in a world where migration
          had produced diverse populations no longer driven by the need for
          territorial sovereignty. Instead, what we have experienced is a resurgence
          of ancient prejudices and hatreds of anyone who looks different, sounds
          different or has a different basis for whatever spirituality is practiced.
          Eric Hoffer's analysis of our species has proven to be accurate. "The true
          believer" is alive and well, and the number of true believers seems to be
          growing daily.

          A serious source of conflict in many societies exists and will not be
          resolved so long as the true believers are determined to gain control of the
          state and thereby impose their doctrines on all by the use of force. This
          threat exists, I believe, even in the established social-democracies.

          As the borders of existing nation-states were established by force of arms
          over many centuries, it seems to me that the only means of achieving a
          degree of peaceful co-existence between groups is by international treaty to
          create the world of nation-states anew, allocating territory to groups of
          people who share the same value system and desire to live together but
          separate from any others. I am not suggesting this would end the violence,
          but people would have the opportunity to "vote with their feet" under what
          societal framework they wished to live.

          Of course, a parallel agreement to equitably share the global rent fund
          associated with natural resources would increase the prospects of success.
          An effective, enforceable, Law of the Sea Treaty would be a good start.

          Ed Dodson
        • DavidH
          [repeating my post @ geoact, since landcafe is more read] I just recently read The Law for the first time, after hearing and reading libertarians quote Batiat
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 30, 2011
            [repeating my post @ geoact, since landcafe is more read]

            I just recently read The Law for the first time, after hearing and reading libertarians quote Batiat forever. (I read Hayek's "Serfdom" at 18, but for whatever reason, never got around to Bastiat until recently.)

            On the issues of positive vs. negative rights, and the use of government to plunder and transfer wealth, "The Law" is the primer on legitimate purposes of government that most of us never got in high school or college. It seems George must have borrowed language from Bastiat, or perhaps the ideas and formulations were just pervasive in political philosophy of the period.

            As you note, it seems his treatment of land titles is oblique.In "The Law," he omits land title from his definition of property. It seems he assumes the right to land as part of the right to life, but is uncomfortable directly saying so. Even with that shortcoming, "The Law" beats anything else I have seen and it reads like it could have been ripped from today's headlines. It is fully complementary to George's writings, just more targeted at types of privilege other than land title.

            If the guy had lived longer (he died at age 49), I wonder what he might have said upon reading "Progress and Poverty."

            david harrell.



            --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, "DanS" <director@...> wrote:
            >
            > Bastiat is big with the Austrian School of Economics and with conservatives and neolibertarians. This is an analysis of why his "Broken Window Fallacy" does not hold true.
            >
            > It can help geolibertarians deal with right-wing neolibertarians.
            >
            > http://www.savingcommunities.org/econ/brokenwindow.html
            >
            > -ds
            >
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