Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Car running costs

Expand Messages
  • janet paske
    The cost of running a car has passed the £2,000-a-year mark for the first time, a survey has revealed: The average annual cost of motoring has doubled in the
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      The cost of running a car has passed the £2,000-a-year mark for the first
      time, a survey has revealed:

      The average annual cost of motoring has doubled in the past ten years and is
      now around £2,053, excluding interest repayments on loans and depreciation
      of the cost of the car.

      With petrol and diesel prices soaring - the £4 gallon having become the norm
      - the biggest cost is fuel.

      The average motorist spends around £1,104.90 a year on petrol, plus around
      £459 a year on insurance. The rest goes on servicing (£250), MoT (£40.75),
      road tax (£118.73) and roadside assistance (£80), according to the recent
      survey by Sainsbury's Bank.

      Janet



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • oona.emerson
      Thanks Janet Very interesting. But why exclude the capital costs - which must be about the same order, i.e. about £2k a year on average? It would be
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks Janet

        Very interesting. But why exclude the capital costs - which must be about
        the same order, i.e. about £2k a year on average?

        It would be interesting to work out how much per year is saved by not owning
        a car? Our total family transport spending (less overseas trips and less
        trips re-imbursed by work) is of the order of £1k a year. Does anyone know
        of an organisation for 'non car-owners'?

        Sincerely

        Oona and Tony


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "janet paske" <janet@...>
        To: <Lambeth_Cyclists@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2005 7:08 PM
        Subject: [Lambeth_Cyclists] Car running costs


        The cost of running a car has passed the £2,000-a-year mark for the first
        time, a survey has revealed:

        The average annual cost of motoring has doubled in the past ten years and is
        now around £2,053, excluding interest repayments on loans and depreciation
        of the cost of the car.

        With petrol and diesel prices soaring - the £4 gallon having become the norm
        - the biggest cost is fuel.

        The average motorist spends around £1,104.90 a year on petrol, plus around
        £459 a year on insurance. The rest goes on servicing (£250), MoT (£40.75),
        road tax (£118.73) and roadside assistance (£80), according to the recent
        survey by Sainsbury's Bank.

        Janet



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        Too many e-mails? Don't leave! Try one of the following:

        * Create a folder in your inbox and set up a rule for e-mails with
        [Lambeth_Cyclists] in the subject title, which you can then read at leisure.

        * Set your Yahoo group subscription for either:

        - A daily digest of one e-mail containing all the day's messages, or

        - Read messages on the website only without receiving e-mails.

        Log onto the website, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Lambeth_Cyclists/ or
        just ask us to change the setting for you if you're not sure how to do this.

        * Simply let us know if you only want 'official' announcements of Lambeth
        Cyclists as e-mails (e.g. for meetings, events, rides, and other campaign
        information) without the discussion.

        Email: lambeth_cyclists@...

        Lambeth Cyclists http://www.lambethcyclists.org.uk/ are the local borough
        group affiliated to the London Cycling Campaign: http://www.lcc.org.uk/


        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • jontaylor@dial.pipex.com
        agree - depreciation costs are one of the biggest (and often forgotten) real costs of driving - the moment folk drive even a mid price car off the forecourt
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 1, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          agree - depreciation costs are one of the biggest (and often forgotten) real
          costs of driving - the moment folk drive even a mid price car off the
          forecourt they've usually lost thousands. Folk who change their car every 2 to
          3 years get hit massively as the early years account for the largest
          depreciation. As for those who change cars every year, either completely barmy
          or very rich.

          Paul

          Quoting "oona.emerson" <oona.emerson@...>:

          > Thanks Janet
          >
          > Very interesting. But why exclude the capital costs - which must be about
          > the same order, i.e. about £2k a year on average?
          >
          > It would be interesting to work out how much per year is saved by not owning
          > a car? Our total family transport spending (less overseas trips and less
          > trips re-imbursed by work) is of the order of £1k a year. Does anyone know
          > of an organisation for 'non car-owners'?
          >
          > Sincerely
          >
          > Oona and Tony
          >
          >
          >
        • Ross Corben
          The Inland Revenue allow a max of 25% pa depreciation, but you can basically wipe £1000 off the price of a new car once you have driven it out of the showroom
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 6, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            The Inland Revenue allow a max of 25% pa depreciation, but you can basically
            wipe £1000 off the price of a new car once you have driven it out of the
            showroom

            other costs: loss of amenity of capital (having it there to use when
            otherwise needed, meaning having to take out a loan / budget), loss of
            interest on it savings, road tax, annual MoT from 3rd year onwards, spares,
            repairs, parking permit, modifications (essential to some - boys & their
            toys? see http://www.barryboys.co.uk/mx/ this website is a scream), learning
            to drive, fines etc

            hiring a car for family trips at weekends (£90 including insurance+£40
            average petrol, £300 returnable deposit) lets you realise the costs /
            benefits of travel & the savings of not being an owner-driver

            even the ETA http://www.eta.co.uk/ is for the motorist
            the lcc & living streets aren't

            >> Very interesting. But why exclude the capital costs - which must be
            about
            > the same order, i.e. about £2k a year on average?
            > It would be interesting to work out how much per year is saved by not
            owning
            > a car? Our total family transport spending (less overseas trips and less
            > trips re-imbursed by work) is of the order of £1k a year. Does anyone
            know
            > of an organisation for 'non car-owners'?<<

            > The cost of running a car has passed the £2,000-a-year mark for the first
            > time, a survey has revealed:
            >
            > The average annual cost of motoring has doubled in the past ten years and
            is
            > now around £2,053, excluding interest repayments on loans and depreciation
            > of the cost of the car.
            >
            > With petrol and diesel prices soaring - the £4 gallon having become the
            norm
            > - the biggest cost is fuel.
            >
            > The average motorist spends around £1,104.90 a year on petrol, plus around
            > £459 a year on insurance. The rest goes on servicing (£250), MoT (£40.75),
            > road tax (£118.73) and roadside assistance (£80), according to the recent
            > survey by Sainsbury's Bank.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.