Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: LaCrosse 2010 Wireless Sensor Protocol Help Needed exact wireless frequency?

Expand Messages
  • stevech11
    generally, in the 433MHz band, these low cost devices use on-off keying (OOK). The data is coded so there is a 50% ratio of 1 s and 0 s. With this, the
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 25, 2009
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      generally, in the 433MHz band, these low cost devices use "on-off keying" (OOK). The data is coded so there is a 50% ratio of 1's and 0's. With this, the receiver is simply a data slicer (threshold detector, biased by the average signal strength).

      The data messages are likely 10mSec or so of bits, prefaced with a string of 10101 to prime the data slicer.

      FCC regulations prohibit transmitting with more than about 1% duty cycle.

      In the 900MHz band the FCC restrictions are less onerous.


      --- In Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com, "don_wa5ngp" <don_wa5ngp@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com, "licatac91384"
      > I'm not much help. However, I would think that somewhere is an id byte that is the same consistently. Have you noticed that? Then go from there one at a time.
      >
      > What frequency did you detect it exactly? Mine says that its on 433.92 but when I try to "listen" on my scanner I don't hear anything. I've tried scanning around but can't find it. It is working as I'm using wireless mode.
      >
      > Is it just a carrier that goes on and off? Is that all there is to it?
      > regards
      > Don
      > <licatac91384@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I'm trying to understand the wireless protocol emitted from the LaCrosse WS2010-22, WS2010-25, WS2010-20, WS2010-15, and WS2010-16 sensors. I'm successfully receiving messages on my 433Mhz receiver consisting of four bytes from each of my sensors but have had no luck find how to decode the contents. ("12 C2 11 00", "80 F0 02 10", ...)
      > >
      > > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      > >
      >
    • don_wa5ngp
      With a less than 1% duty cycle I can see that the human ear may not detect that a signal is there when listening to a normal receiver. Might just hear a click.
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 26, 2009
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        With a less than 1% duty cycle I can see that the human ear may not detect that a signal is there when listening to a normal receiver. Might just hear a click. So it may be a matter of tracking it thru a data slicer as you call it. I'll do some googling on OOK if that's the right buzzword to describe it. In a way its just like old fashioned morse code or CW. Just on and off but very short duty cycle compared to morse code usage of the old days.

        I can see how such a short burst would work. After all, this is not much data to pass along.

        thanks for the background

        don

        -- In Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com, "stevech11" <childresss@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > generally, in the 433MHz band, these low cost devices use "on-off keying" (OOK). The data is coded so there is a 50% ratio of 1's and 0's. With this, the receiver is simply a data slicer (threshold detector, biased by the average signal strength).
        >
        > The data messages are likely 10mSec or so of bits, prefaced with a string of 10101 to prime the data slicer.
        >
        > FCC regulations prohibit transmitting with more than about 1% duty cycle.
        >
        > In the 900MHz band the FCC restrictions are less onerous.
        >
        >
        > --- In Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com, "don_wa5ngp" <don_wa5ngp@> wrote:
        > >
        > > --- In Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com, "licatac91384"
        > > I'm not much help. However, I would think that somewhere is an id byte that is the same consistently. Have you noticed that? Then go from there one at a time.
        > >
        > > What frequency did you detect it exactly? Mine says that its on 433.92 but when I try to "listen" on my scanner I don't hear anything. I've tried scanning around but can't find it. It is working as I'm using wireless mode.
        > >
        > > Is it just a carrier that goes on and off? Is that all there is to it?
        > > regards
        > > Don
        > > <licatac91384@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I'm trying to understand the wireless protocol emitted from the LaCrosse WS2010-22, WS2010-25, WS2010-20, WS2010-15, and WS2010-16 sensors. I'm successfully receiving messages on my 433Mhz receiver consisting of four bytes from each of my sensors but have had no luck find how to decode the contents. ("12 C2 11 00", "80 F0 02 10", ...)
        > > >
        > > > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • laurie camion
        Most scanners will not respond to these signals, you might just hear a click if it can be switched to AM, but FM is designed to eliminate noise like this.  
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 26, 2009
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Most scanners will not respond to these signals, you might just hear a click if it can be switched to AM, but FM is designed to eliminate "noise" like this.
           
          Simple receiver modules for these frequencies are very cheap, < $10, so one of those and a 'scope is the best way to start.

          --- On Wed, 8/26/09, don_wa5ngp <don_wa5ngp@...> wrote:


          From: don_wa5ngp <don_wa5ngp@...>
          Subject: [LacrosseWS] Re: LaCrosse 2010 Wireless Sensor Protocol Help Needed exact wireless frequency?
          To: Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 10:11 AM


           



          With a less than 1% duty cycle I can see that the human ear may not detect that a signal is there when listening to a normal receiver. Might just hear a click. So it may be a matter of tracking it thru a data slicer as you call it. I'll do some googling on OOK if that's the right buzzword to describe it. In a way its just like old fashioned morse code or CW. Just on and off but very short duty cycle compared to morse code usage of the old days.

          I can see how such a short burst would work. After all, this is not much data to pass along.

          thanks for the background

          don

          -- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "stevech11" <childresss@ ...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > generally, in the 433MHz band, these low cost devices use "on-off keying" (OOK). The data is coded so there is a 50% ratio of 1's and 0's. With this, the receiver is simply a data slicer (threshold detector, biased by the average signal strength).
          >
          > The data messages are likely 10mSec or so of bits, prefaced with a string of 10101 to prime the data slicer.
          >
          > FCC regulations prohibit transmitting with more than about 1% duty cycle.
          >
          > In the 900MHz band the FCC restrictions are less onerous.
          >
          >
          > --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "don_wa5ngp" <don_wa5ngp@ > wrote:
          > >
          > > --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "licatac91384"
          > > I'm not much help. However, I would think that somewhere is an id byte that is the same consistently. Have you noticed that? Then go from there one at a time.
          > >
          > > What frequency did you detect it exactly? Mine says that its on 433.92 but when I try to "listen" on my scanner I don't hear anything. I've tried scanning around but can't find it. It is working as I'm using wireless mode.
          > >
          > > Is it just a carrier that goes on and off? Is that all there is to it?
          > > regards
          > > Don
          > > <licatac91384@ > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > I'm trying to understand the wireless protocol emitted from the LaCrosse WS2010-22, WS2010-25, WS2010-20, WS2010-15, and WS2010-16 sensors. I'm successfully receiving messages on my 433Mhz receiver consisting of four bytes from each of my sensors but have had no luck find how to decode the contents. ("12 C2 11 00", "80 F0 02 10", ...)
          > > >
          > > > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
          > > >
          > >
          >



















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • stevech11
          re below.. Yes, OOK is AM modulation with just two-levels. The trick is in the coding so the ratio of On s and Off s is about 50% so that the average carrier
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 26, 2009
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            re below..
            Yes, OOK is AM modulation with just two-levels. The trick is in the coding so the ratio of On's and Off's is about 50% so that the average carrier signal strength is used as the threshold in the detector.

            So google a bit for OOK and Manchester data encoding.

            You can use a digital 'scope on the receiver's data slicer and set it for single-trace to capture the data. Then mission impossible: reverse-engineering what all the bits mean!


            --- In Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com, laurie camion <lauriecam2006@...> wrote:
            >
            > Most scanners will not respond to these signals, you might just hear a click if it can be switched to AM, but FM is designed to eliminate "noise" like this.
            >  
            > Simple receiver modules for these frequencies are very cheap, < $10, so one of those and a 'scope is the best way to start.
            >
            > --- On Wed, 8/26/09, don_wa5ngp <don_wa5ngp@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: don_wa5ngp <don_wa5ngp@...>
            > Subject: [LacrosseWS] Re: LaCrosse 2010 Wireless Sensor Protocol Help Needed exact wireless frequency?
            > To: Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 10:11 AM
            >
            >
            >  
            >
            >
            >
            > With a less than 1% duty cycle I can see that the human ear may not detect that a signal is there when listening to a normal receiver. Might just hear a click. So it may be a matter of tracking it thru a data slicer as you call it. I'll do some googling on OOK if that's the right buzzword to describe it. In a way its just like old fashioned morse code or CW. Just on and off but very short duty cycle compared to morse code usage of the old days.
            >
            > I can see how such a short burst would work. After all, this is not much data to pass along.
            >
            > thanks for the background
            >
            > don
            >
            > -- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "stevech11" <childresss@ ...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > generally, in the 433MHz band, these low cost devices use "on-off keying" (OOK). The data is coded so there is a 50% ratio of 1's and 0's. With this, the receiver is simply a data slicer (threshold detector, biased by the average signal strength).
            > >
            > > The data messages are likely 10mSec or so of bits, prefaced with a string of 10101 to prime the data slicer.
            > >
            > > FCC regulations prohibit transmitting with more than about 1% duty cycle.
            > >
            > > In the 900MHz band the FCC restrictions are less onerous.
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "don_wa5ngp" <don_wa5ngp@ > wrote:
            > > >
            > > > --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "licatac91384"
            > > > I'm not much help. However, I would think that somewhere is an id byte that is the same consistently. Have you noticed that? Then go from there one at a time.
            > > >
            > > > What frequency did you detect it exactly? Mine says that its on 433.92 but when I try to "listen" on my scanner I don't hear anything. I've tried scanning around but can't find it. It is working as I'm using wireless mode.
            > > >
            > > > Is it just a carrier that goes on and off? Is that all there is to it?
            > > > regards
            > > > Don
            > > > <licatac91384@ > wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > I'm trying to understand the wireless protocol emitted from the LaCrosse WS2010-22, WS2010-25, WS2010-20, WS2010-15, and WS2010-16 sensors. I'm successfully receiving messages on my 433Mhz receiver consisting of four bytes from each of my sensors but have had no luck find how to decode the contents. ("12 C2 11 00", "80 F0 02 10", ...)
            > > > >
            > > > > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • laurie camion
            I haven t looked at the LC signal but FWIW I can tell you that the Davis wireless signal is a very low duty cycle, way less than 50%, so you may not be able to
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 26, 2009
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              I haven't looked at the LC signal but FWIW I can tell you that the Davis wireless signal is a very low duty cycle, way less than 50%, so you may not be able to average it. Maybe peak detect and take 50% of that hoping there are some preamble bits...

              --- On Wed, 8/26/09, stevech11 <childresss@...> wrote:


              From: stevech11 <childresss@...>
              Subject: [LacrosseWS] Re: LaCrosse 2010 Wireless Sensor Protocol Help Needed exact wireless frequency?
              To: Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 8:18 PM


               



              re below..
              Yes, OOK is AM modulation with just two-levels. The trick is in the coding so the ratio of On's and Off's is about 50% so that the average carrier signal strength is used as the threshold in the detector.

              So google a bit for OOK and Manchester data encoding.

              You can use a digital 'scope on the receiver's data slicer and set it for single-trace to capture the data. Then mission impossible: reverse-engineering what all the bits mean!

              --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, laurie camion <lauriecam2006@ ...> wrote:
              >
              > Most scanners will not respond to these signals, you might just hear a click if it can be switched to AM, but FM is designed to eliminate "noise" like this.
              >  
              > Simple receiver modules for these frequencies are very cheap, < $10, so one of those and a 'scope is the best way to start.
              >
              > --- On Wed, 8/26/09, don_wa5ngp <don_wa5ngp@ ...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: don_wa5ngp <don_wa5ngp@ ...>
              > Subject: [LacrosseWS] Re: LaCrosse 2010 Wireless Sensor Protocol Help Needed exact wireless frequency?
              > To: Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com
              > Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 10:11 AM
              >
              >
              >  
              >
              >
              >
              > With a less than 1% duty cycle I can see that the human ear may not detect that a signal is there when listening to a normal receiver. Might just hear a click. So it may be a matter of tracking it thru a data slicer as you call it. I'll do some googling on OOK if that's the right buzzword to describe it. In a way its just like old fashioned morse code or CW. Just on and off but very short duty cycle compared to morse code usage of the old days.
              >
              > I can see how such a short burst would work. After all, this is not much data to pass along.
              >
              > thanks for the background
              >
              > don
              >
              > -- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "stevech11" <childresss@ ...> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > generally, in the 433MHz band, these low cost devices use "on-off keying" (OOK). The data is coded so there is a 50% ratio of 1's and 0's. With this, the receiver is simply a data slicer (threshold detector, biased by the average signal strength).
              > >
              > > The data messages are likely 10mSec or so of bits, prefaced with a string of 10101 to prime the data slicer.
              > >
              > > FCC regulations prohibit transmitting with more than about 1% duty cycle.
              > >
              > > In the 900MHz band the FCC restrictions are less onerous.
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "don_wa5ngp" <don_wa5ngp@ > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "licatac91384"
              > > > I'm not much help. However, I would think that somewhere is an id byte that is the same consistently. Have you noticed that? Then go from there one at a time.
              > > >
              > > > What frequency did you detect it exactly? Mine says that its on 433.92 but when I try to "listen" on my scanner I don't hear anything. I've tried scanning around but can't find it. It is working as I'm using wireless mode.
              > > >
              > > > Is it just a carrier that goes on and off? Is that all there is to it?
              > > > regards
              > > > Don
              > > > <licatac91384@ > wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > I'm trying to understand the wireless protocol emitted from the LaCrosse WS2010-22, WS2010-25, WS2010-20, WS2010-15, and WS2010-16 sensors. I'm successfully receiving messages on my 433Mhz receiver consisting of four bytes from each of my sensors but have had no luck find how to decode the contents. ("12 C2 11 00", "80 F0 02 10", ...)
              > > > >
              > > > > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >



















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ben Young
              Lynx Technologies has a receiver that can do the 433.92MHz, OOK.  I played with the module a bit for anothe rproject, and I saw my weather station, and other
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 16, 2009
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Lynx Technologies has a receiver that can do the 433.92MHz, OOK.  I played with the module a bit for anothe rproject, and I saw my weather station, and other stuff too, pop in.  Never spent time decoding.
                 
                But the Lynx module is really easy to use.  50 ohm in to one pad, power into another set, and data out on another.  Going from memory, you want the LC series.

                --- On Thu, 8/27/09, laurie camion <lauriecam2006@...> wrote:


                From: laurie camion <lauriecam2006@...>
                Subject: Re: [LacrosseWS] Re: LaCrosse 2010 Wireless Sensor Protocol Help Needed exact wireless frequency?
                To: Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, August 27, 2009, 3:30 AM


                I haven't looked at the LC signal but FWIW I can tell you that the Davis wireless signal is a very low duty cycle, way less than 50%, so you may not be able to average it. Maybe peak detect and take 50% of that hoping there are some preamble bits...

                --- On Wed, 8/26/09, stevech11 <childresss@...> wrote:


                From: stevech11 <childresss@...>
                Subject: [LacrosseWS] Re: LaCrosse 2010 Wireless Sensor Protocol Help Needed exact wireless frequency?
                To: Lacrosse_weather_stations@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 8:18 PM


                 



                re below..
                Yes, OOK is AM modulation with just two-levels. The trick is in the coding so the ratio of On's and Off's is about 50% so that the average carrier signal strength is used as the threshold in the detector.

                So google a bit for OOK and Manchester data encoding.

                You can use a digital 'scope on the receiver's data slicer and set it for single-trace to capture the data. Then mission impossible: reverse-engineering what all the bits mean!

                --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, laurie camion <lauriecam2006@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > Most scanners will not respond to these signals, you might just hear a click if it can be switched to AM, but FM is designed to eliminate "noise" like this.
                >  
                > Simple receiver modules for these frequencies are very cheap, < $10, so one of those and a 'scope is the best way to start.
                >
                > --- On Wed, 8/26/09, don_wa5ngp <don_wa5ngp@ ...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > From: don_wa5ngp <don_wa5ngp@ ...>
                > Subject: [LacrosseWS] Re: LaCrosse 2010 Wireless Sensor Protocol Help Needed exact wireless frequency?
                > To: Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com
                > Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 10:11 AM
                >
                >
                >  
                >
                >
                >
                > With a less than 1% duty cycle I can see that the human ear may not detect that a signal is there when listening to a normal receiver. Might just hear a click. So it may be a matter of tracking it thru a data slicer as you call it. I'll do some googling on OOK if that's the right buzzword to describe it. In a way its just like old fashioned morse code or CW. Just on and off but very short duty cycle compared to morse code usage of the old days.
                >
                > I can see how such a short burst would work. After all, this is not much data to pass along.
                >
                > thanks for the background
                >
                > don
                >
                > -- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "stevech11" <childresss@ ...> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > generally, in the 433MHz band, these low cost devices use "on-off keying" (OOK). The data is coded so there is a 50% ratio of 1's and 0's. With this, the receiver is simply a data slicer (threshold detector, biased by the average signal strength).
                > >
                > > The data messages are likely 10mSec or so of bits, prefaced with a string of 10101 to prime the data slicer.
                > >
                > > FCC regulations prohibit transmitting with more than about 1% duty cycle.
                > >
                > > In the 900MHz band the FCC restrictions are less onerous.
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "don_wa5ngp" <don_wa5ngp@ > wrote:
                > > >
                > > > --- In Lacrosse_weather_ stations@ yahoogroups. com, "licatac91384"
                > > > I'm not much help. However, I would think that somewhere is an id byte that is the same consistently. Have you noticed that? Then go from there one at a time.
                > > >
                > > > What frequency did you detect it exactly? Mine says that its on 433.92 but when I try to "listen" on my scanner I don't hear anything. I've tried scanning around but can't find it. It is working as I'm using wireless mode.
                > > >
                > > > Is it just a carrier that goes on and off? Is that all there is to it?
                > > > regards
                > > > Don
                > > > <licatac91384@ > wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > I'm trying to understand the wireless protocol emitted from the LaCrosse WS2010-22, WS2010-25, WS2010-20, WS2010-15, and WS2010-16 sensors. I'm successfully receiving messages on my 433Mhz receiver consisting of four bytes from each of my sensors but have had no luck find how to decode the contents. ("12 C2 11 00", "80 F0 02 10", ...)
                > > > >
                > > > > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >

















                     

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                ------------------------------------

                Yahoo! Groups Links








                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.