Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Best off-axis guider

Expand Messages
  • Steven
    I ve tried a couple of the low-end (Meade and Orion Deluxe OAG ). Sessions usually end in frustration and I swing back to using a guide scope. Much easier and
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 1, 2011
      I've tried a couple of the low-end (Meade and Orion Deluxe OAG ). Sessions usually end in frustration and I swing back to using a guide scope. Much easier and more flexible, given the mirror lock on the ACF, a good solid refractor and guide rings, should provide a pretty stable platform.

      Using an off axis guider on a fork mounted SCT adds significant length to the imaging train, making it even harder to image at high declinations. I've also had difficulty getting an OAG to work at all when you try to put a filter wheel ( or anything else ) between it and the camera, as it makes the guide camera too far from the pick off mirror.



      --- In LX200GPS@yahoogroups.com, "Erik" <skulboep@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hey everyone, this is my first post after much research and planning.
      >
      > I'm finally taking the plunge into astrophotography with my LX200 and have decided to go the off-axis guider route for guiding in order to avoid differential flexure. Unfortunately after MUCH research, I have yet to find any solid recommendations on what the BEST commercially available off-axis guider is (try Googling "best off-axis guider" -- the results are frustrating...). I have an 8" LX200-ACF and will be shooting with a Nikon D7000. I am still looking into guide cameras (Orion StarShoot??), but that is a different discussion for a different day.
      >
      > Given my setup, what off-axis guider would you guys recommend? I'm willing to drop a decent amount of $$$ for something that is quality and not absurdly expensive (i.e. under 4 figures).
      >
      > One last note: I plan to shoot multiple short exposures in Alt-az and then stack afterwards. I will most likely eventually go the wedge route, but the off-axis guider is the first priority (not to mention good wedges are not cheap these days). Not sure if this changes anyone's recommendations...
      >
      > Thanks again for all your help,
      > Erik
      >
    • ian matterson
      Hi Erik, as has already been pointed out to you their are many short comings when trying to guide an lx200 via the off axis route, your are correct to worry
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 2, 2011
        Hi Erik,
        as has already been pointed out to you their are many short comings when trying to guide an lx200 via the off axis route, your are correct to worry about flexure, but unlike other sct's on the market the LX's have a very good mirror lock which helps to overcome this issue very well.
        IMHO you would be much better of getting hold of a good quality F6 /7 80mm+, APO refractor and piggy back this to your LX, this will require additional balancing, but the added flexability and future proofing to you imaging will be greatly improved.
        with this setup you will be able to image and guide thru either scope allowing you to capture objects that simply will not fit in the FOV of your LX alone.
        Ian Matterson

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Erik
        Sent: 09/30/11 03:54 PM
        To: LX200GPS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [LX200GPS] Best off-axis guider

        Hey everyone, this is my first post after much research and planning.

        I'm finally taking the plunge into astrophotography with my LX200 and have decided to go the off-axis guider route for guiding in order to avoid differential flexure. Unfortunately after MUCH research, I have yet to find any solid recommendations on what the BEST commercially available off-axis guider is (try Googling "best off-axis guider" -- the results are frustrating...). I have an 8" LX200-ACF and will be shooting with a Nikon D7000. I am still looking into guide cameras (Orion StarShoot??), but that is a different discussion for a different day.

        Given my setup, what off-axis guider would you guys recommend? I'm willing to drop a decent amount of $$$ for something that is quality and not absurdly expensive (i.e. under 4 figures).

        One last note: I plan to shoot multiple short exposures in Alt-az and then stack afterwards. I will most likely eventually go the wedge route, but the off-axis guider is the first priority (not to mention good wedges are not cheap these days). Not sure if this changes anyone's recommendations...

        Thanks again for all your help,
        Erik




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tim Campbell
        One of the guys in my club owns an SBIG camera (I do not know which model... sorry) but the point is, it has a built-in off-axis guider. The main CCD is
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 2, 2011
          One of the guys in my club owns an SBIG camera (I do not know which model... sorry) but the point is, it has a built-in off-axis guider.

          The main CCD is centered and large. The secondary CCD is off-center and small. The idea being that since both imagers are in the same housing there is no flexure.

          They tell me SBIG owns the patent on the idea so I don't know that you can get a camera with an integrated imager from anyone else.

          Sent from my iPad

          On Oct 2, 2011, at 3:18 AM, ian matterson <ian.matterson@...> wrote:

          > Hi Erik,
          > as has already been pointed out to you their are many short comings when trying to guide an lx200 via the off axis route, your are correct to worry about flexure, but unlike other sct's on the market the LX's have a very good mirror lock which helps to overcome this issue very well.
          > IMHO you would be much better of getting hold of a good quality F6 /7 80mm+, APO refractor and piggy back this to your LX, this will require additional balancing, but the added flexability and future proofing to you imaging will be greatly improved.
          > with this setup you will be able to image and guide thru either scope allowing you to capture objects that simply will not fit in the FOV of your LX alone.
          > Ian Matterson
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Erik
          > Sent: 09/30/11 03:54 PM
          > To: LX200GPS@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [LX200GPS] Best off-axis guider
          >
          > Hey everyone, this is my first post after much research and planning.
          >
          > I'm finally taking the plunge into astrophotography with my LX200 and have decided to go the off-axis guider route for guiding in order to avoid differential flexure. Unfortunately after MUCH research, I have yet to find any solid recommendations on what the BEST commercially available off-axis guider is (try Googling "best off-axis guider" -- the results are frustrating...). I have an 8" LX200-ACF and will be shooting with a Nikon D7000. I am still looking into guide cameras (Orion StarShoot??), but that is a different discussion for a different day.
          >
          > Given my setup, what off-axis guider would you guys recommend? I'm willing to drop a decent amount of $$$ for something that is quality and not absurdly expensive (i.e. under 4 figures).
          >
          > One last note: I plan to shoot multiple short exposures in Alt-az and then stack afterwards. I will most likely eventually go the wedge route, but the off-axis guider is the first priority (not to mention good wedges are not cheap these days). Not sure if this changes anyone's recommendations...
          >
          > Thanks again for all your help,
          > Erik
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jason Ware
          Don t agree at all here. If you are imaging through the scope you need to guide with corrections every couple of seconds or so to get the best resolution and
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 5, 2011
            Don't agree at all here. If you are imaging through the scope you need to guide with
            corrections every couple of seconds or so to get the best resolution and tightest
            stars.


            To clarify a bit: with decent PEC training, you don't really need guiding unless exposures are over about 1 minute, which is also roughly when field rotation becomes a problem, so until you have a wedge, the question of which guiding method to use is not too important.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.