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Re: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors

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  • Sam King
    Does anyone know who to contact to get my house number sprayed on the curbside? Sam ... From: markvollinger@rocketmail.com
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 8, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Does anyone know who to contact to get my house number sprayed on the curbside?

      Sam

      --- On Thu, 8/10/09, markvollinger@... <markvollinger@...> wrote:

      From: markvollinger@... <markvollinger@...>
      Subject: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors
      To: LVNA90004@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, 8 October, 2009, 6:44 PM






       





      Folks:

      Just a reminder we need one person from each street Rossmore to Manhattan to attend this evenings meeting at 6:30PM- 7:15PM

      542 N. Plymouth Blvd.

      Thank you



      Mark Vollinger































      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • markvollinger@rocketmail.com
      This evening s meeting with Joe Pelayo, one of the LVNA Police Liaisons was a good first start. I will write a short piece for the Chronicle. We did get one
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 8, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        This evening's meeting with Joe Pelayo, one of the LVNA Police Liaisons was a good first start. I will write a short piece for the Chronicle. We did get one very large wake up call from our neighbors.

        The Recycle Bin
        The blue bin is now the Burglar access to the street, our Cars and Homes. Bin rummaging with a shopping cart is the cover.

        Car thieves with carts are checking for unlocked car doors to rifle immediately or spot valuables for a later window smash entry. Police in Olympic found 8 out of 10 cars UNLOCKED in a random check of an area.

        Burglars (disguised as "recyclers" with a shopping cart) are casing homes and breaking in by walking up driveways, testing windows and doors under the guise of getting to the blue bin. Last Thursday I witnessed an individual walk right up a driveway past the bin and into the back yard, cart parked on the sidewalk.

        RESPONSE
        Take away the cover and cheese. Report all activity. Don't put your Blue Bin out until morning. Do not allow people to rummage through the bins and walk up driveways.

        It is unfortunate, but it will be a start to reduce car and home break-ins. We appreciate Officer Joe Pelayo's time and support.
      • georgeafenady@aol.com
        Hello, I never put my Blue Bin out! Every few weeks (like today) I load my car with all our Recycling and take it to a local recycling.Maybe if we ALL do that
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 9, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello,

          I never put my Blue Bin out! Every few weeks (like today) I load my car with all
          our Recycling and take it to a local recycling.Maybe if we ALL do that there would
          be no excuse for people roaming our properties! It is not a big deal to do.I always
          receive $30 to $40 dollars for our cans,bottles and plastic.
          Just a thought...I'm off to load my car and head to the recycling location.

          Best, Georgea







          -----Original Message-----
          From: markvollinger@... <markvollinger@...>
          To: LVNA90004@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thu, Oct 8, 2009 10:31 pm
          Subject: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors





























          This evening's meeting with Joe Pelayo, one of the LVNA Police Liaisons was a good first start. I will write a short piece for the Chronicle. We did get one very large wake up call from our neighbors.



          The Recycle Bin

          The blue bin is now the Burglar access to the street, our Cars and Homes. Bin rummaging with a shopping cart is the cover.



          Car thieves with carts are checking for unlocked car doors to rifle immediately or spot valuables for a later window smash entry. Police in Olympic found 8 out of 10 cars UNLOCKED in a random check of an area.



          Burglars (disguised as "recyclers" with a shopping cart) are casing homes and breaking in by walking up driveways, testing windows and doors under the guise of getting to the blue bin. Last Thursday I witnessed an individual walk right up a driveway past the bin and into the back yard, cart parked on the sidewalk.



          RESPONSE

          Take away the cover and cheese. Report all activity. Don't put your Blue Bin out until morning. Do not allow people to rummage through the bins and walk up driveways.



          It is unfortunate, but it will be a start to reduce car and home break-ins. We appreciate Officer Joe Pelayo's time and support.


























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Teddy Kapur
          Mark:   Thank you for this update.  I feel sympathetic for the individuals looking through our bins for a few extra dollars of recyclables, but the safety of
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 9, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Mark:
             
            Thank you for this update.  I feel sympathetic for the individuals looking through our bins for a few extra dollars of recyclables, but the safety of our families comes first.  I don't believe we should allow people to case our homes and cars under the guise of searching for recyclables.
             
            Residents in other neighborhoods have started locking curbside bins to counter this type of problem.  I've raised this idea at LVNA Board meetings, and the Board would like to get your thoughts about LVNA participating in a similar program. 
             
            The way it works is that the bin can be locked by a resident, and it pops open when the automated arm of the garbage truck turns the bin upside down.
             
            Attached below are two articles from the Los Angeles Times.  The first article describes a pilot program in Santa Ana, and the second article is an editorial criticizing the program.  What are your thoughts?  Should we try to arrange for a similar pilot program in our neighborhood?
             
            -- Teddy Kapur
             
            http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-outthere16-2009jun16%2C0%2C2611118.story%c2%a0
             

            http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-ed-recycling20-2009jun20,0,4616451.story
             

            Santa Ana neighborhood locks up trash to thwart scavengers
            Residents are putting their recyclables into containers designed to withstand the brute strength of bears.By Tony Barboza

            June 16, 2009

            They didn't hold up to the bears of Alaska, but they just might be enough to discourage the scavengers of Santa Ana.

            Fed up with urban foragers who root through neighborhood trash in search of plastic and aluminum, residents of one Santa Ana neighborhood are locking up their recyclables in a container designed to withstand the brute strength and cunning of brown and black bears.

            So it is that Paula Faccou now keeps a key -- right on the same chain with her house key -- to lock up her trash. And when the hauler drives down the street and upends the cart over his truck with an automated arm, the gravity-driven lock pops open.

            Now there's hope on Van Ness Avenue that the bear bins will drive off people like the man Faccou nearly bumped into on her driveway one day as she was carrying in groceries.

            "It just scared the living heck out of me," said the 67-year-old retiree. "A complete stranger, standing outside. It was very brazen, and that's pushing it too much. They have told me, 'What's your problem, lady? It's just trash,' but I pay for trash service. . . . I should decide where it goes."

            City officials said they've seen a recent uptick in complaints about scavengers prowling the night before trash day, when bins are full of bottles and cans.

            "It was pretty much a given that the economy was driving the increase in scavenging," said Mary Gonzales, the city's project manager, who is overseeing the program.

            "People wanted some sort of solution to this."

            Scavenging has become a source of frustration in the Wilshire Square neighborhood, where Faccou and others complain of the late-night noise and abandoned shopping carts.

            So residents in this community of wide lawns and Revival-style homes began to push back. After several public meetings to devise an anti-scavenger strategy, the city proposed a lockdown in the neighborhood -- mostly to prevent the scavengers' late-night expeditions but also out of a belief by homeowners that they alone should control the destiny of their garbage.

            The pilot program by Waste Management is being tested this summer at a dozen homes on two streets. The neighborhood is just one of a few nationwide that have started locking up curbside bins.

            As in other cities, it's against the law in Santa Ana for anyone but the property owner or trash hauler to remove items from recycling carts once they are curbside.

            Signs atop bins spell it out: STOP. It's against the law to take recyclables out of the containers and Scavenging is a crime!

            For Faccou, scavenging is degrading her quality of life.

            "They come through at 10:30, 11, 12:30 at night with this clankety clankety clank clank, and they get the dogs going," she said. "We used to turn a blind eye to it, but for the last three years it's been escalating."

            Whereas she used to wait until she heard the rumble of the approaching truck before wheeling her gray bin to the curb, "now I feel more secure," she said.

            Locks are often used to protect commercial recycling and trash containers from dumpster divers and scavengers, but only recently have they been engineered for residential purposes.

            The locking bin used in Santa Ana was first designed as a bear-proof container, said Shawn Kruse, a product development manager for supplier Rehrig Pacific, but "it couldn't stand up to that level of abuse."

            San Bernardino is testing locks to keep trash from spilling out of containers at a dozen homes in a particularly windy neighborhood.

            The city of Los Angeles has considered locks to curb scavenging but hasn't found anything practical. Oceanside has installed anti-scavenging locks on the receptacles at its beaches and harbor, albeit reluctantly.

            "We don't want to be known as the city that locks public recycling containers," said Colleen Foster, management analyst for Oceanside's solid waste and recycling division. "What's important is diversion, getting it away from landfills."

            Not everyone in the Santa Ana neighborhood is sold on the idea.

            Rigo Castro, a 42-year-old carpenter, doesn't see what the fuss is about.

            He sees scavengers pushing grocery carts at night, but "I don't mind," he said. He doubts whether most people consider the scavenging enough of an intrusion to put their recyclables on lockdown.

            Scavengers, for their part, seem to shrug it off. Or adapt.

            Jose Santos, 36, a homeless man who collects bottles and cans in the neighborhood, said the locks haven't deterred him. If he encounters one, he just moves on to the next house or digs through the trash, where people sometimes mistakenly toss glass and plastic.

            On a recent trash pickup day, he was pushing a grocery cart with about $15 worth of bottles and cans -- a night's work -- on his way to a recycling center.

            "There are plenty of good people that even help us out" by leaving bottles and cans out for him or giving him money to eat, Santos said. "So I'm not concerned."

            Lucy Bateson, 62, one of Santa Ana's anti-scavenging crusaders, hopes the locks result in a calmer neighborhood, one where she isn't afraid of strangers coming onto her property to score bottles or cans.

            "Maybe the locking cans will be the answer. It gives you a level of comfort putting it out there," Bateson said. "No matter what anybody says, it's not trash. It has value."
             
             
            ****************************************************

            From the Los Angeles Times
            Editorial
            Santa Ana locks its trash cans
            Have we become so hard-hearted that we deny the homeless even our trash?
             
            June 20, 2009

            In Santa Ana, the city has agreed to place locks on outdoor recycling bins for a dozen neighbors in the Wilshire Square district. The devices, as Times staff writer Tony Barboza reported, were designed to keep bears out of trash cans in Alaska, but there aren't any bears in Santa Ana. Nor are the locks intended to thwart native critters such as raccoons, opossums, ravens or coyotes.

            Somewhere along the line, the city and the neighbors lost sight of the fact that the scavengers targeted by their locking-bin pilot program aren't animals at all but a much more vulnerable species -- homeless human beings, for whom discarded plastic and glass are a last-resort source of sustenance.

            The locks are being tested at the request of residents who lobbied for city protection from the homeless, who were raiding their trash and recycling bins for items with refund value. To be sure, this kind of dumpster diving (or bin burgling) is a nuisance. Residents complain of frightening early morning encounters with homeless men near their driveways or of being awakened at night by barking dogs and the loud clanks of glass bottles.

            What's more, bin burgling can have a small but real cost, which is why it's considered a crime in most cities. Santa Ana contracts with hauler Waste Management, which profits from the recyclables it collects. The "theft" of these items comes at the expense of the contractor rather than the city, but if the losses are significant, it could result in higher trash rates for residents. Waste Management is covering the expense of the new bins, which might be placed at homes in other parts of the city if the test is successful.

            Despite the nuisances, in the grand scheme of things, it's hard to begrudge homeless men and women the pennies they're able to collect from discarded recyclables. For the homeowners who toss them away, the redemption value of containers isn't worth the inconvenience of hauling them to a collection center, yet to the desperately poor they can be a lifeline.

            California has been particularly unkind to its homeless population, which swelled after the mid-1960s when the state ended most involuntary incarceration for the mentally ill. Homeless services have never come close to meeting the demand throughout the state, and the current government budget crisis is reducing services even as the recession causes the number of indigent people to soar.

            A century or two from now, historians may look back at a society so hardhearted that it sends its misfits to live in the streets and then takes steps to ensure that they can't even live off its trash, and wonder at the primitiveness of 21st century man.
             

            --- On Thu, 10/8/09, markvollinger@... <markvollinger@...> wrote:


            From: markvollinger@... <markvollinger@...>
            Subject: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors
            To: LVNA90004@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, October 8, 2009, 10:31 PM


             





            This evening's meeting with Joe Pelayo, one of the LVNA Police Liaisons was a good first start. I will write a short piece for the Chronicle. We did get one very large wake up call from our neighbors.

            The Recycle Bin
            The blue bin is now the Burglar access to the street, our Cars and Homes. Bin rummaging with a shopping cart is the cover.

            Car thieves with carts are checking for unlocked car doors to rifle immediately or spot valuables for a later window smash entry. Police in Olympic found 8 out of 10 cars UNLOCKED in a random check of an area.

            Burglars (disguised as "recyclers" with a shopping cart) are casing homes and breaking in by walking up driveways, testing windows and doors under the guise of getting to the blue bin. Last Thursday I witnessed an individual walk right up a driveway past the bin and into the back yard, cart parked on the sidewalk.

            RESPONSE
            Take away the cover and cheese. Report all activity. Don't put your Blue Bin out until morning. Do not allow people to rummage through the bins and walk up driveways.

            It is unfortunate, but it will be a start to reduce car and home break-ins. We appreciate Officer Joe Pelayo's time and support.
















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Mark Vollinger
            Teddy: Yes, let s look at that option. Immediately, let s keep blue bins off the street and either keep the recycles for the school, scouts or only put them
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 12, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Teddy:
              Yes, let's look at that option.
              Immediately, let's keep blue bins off the street and either keep the recycles for the school, scouts or only put them out on Fri AM.

              Mark 




              ________________________________
              From: Teddy Kapur <teddykapur@...>
              To: LVNA90004@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, October 9, 2009 9:00:55 AM
              Subject: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors

               
              Mark:
               
              Thank you for this update.  I feel sympathetic for the individuals looking through our bins for a few extra dollars of recyclables, but the safety of our families comes first.  I don't believe we should allow people to case our homes and cars under the guise of searching for recyclables.
               
              Residents in other neighborhoods have started locking curbside bins to counter this type of problem.  I've raised this idea at LVNA Board meetings, and the Board would like to get your thoughts about LVNA participating in a similar program. 
               
              The way it works is that the bin can be locked by a resident, and it pops open when the automated arm of the garbage truck turns the bin upside down.
               
              Attached below are two articles from the Los Angeles Times.  The first article describes a pilot program in Santa Ana, and the second article is an editorial criticizing the program.  What are your thoughts?  Should we try to arrange for a similar pilot program in our neighborhood?
               
              -- Teddy Kapur
               
              http://www.latimes com/news/ local/la- me-outthere16- 2009jun16% 2C0%2C2611118. story 
               

              http://www.latimes com/news/ opinion/commenta ry/la-ed- recycling20- 2009jun20, 0,4616451. story
               

              Santa Ana neighborhood locks up trash to thwart scavengers
              Residents are putting their recyclables into containers designed to withstand the brute strength of bears.By Tony Barboza

              June 16, 2009

              They didn't hold up to the bears of Alaska, but they just might be enough to discourage the scavengers of Santa Ana.

              Fed up with urban foragers who root through neighborhood trash in search of plastic and aluminum, residents of one Santa Ana neighborhood are locking up their recyclables in a container designed to withstand the brute strength and cunning of brown and black bears.

              So it is that Paula Faccou now keeps a key -- right on the same chain with her house key -- to lock up her trash. And when the hauler drives down the street and upends the cart over his truck with an automated arm, the gravity-driven lock pops open.

              Now there's hope on Van Ness Avenue that the bear bins will drive off people like the man Faccou nearly bumped into on her driveway one day as she was carrying in groceries.

              "It just scared the living heck out of me," said the 67-year-old retiree. "A complete stranger, standing outside. It was very brazen, and that's pushing it too much. They have told me, 'What's your problem, lady? It's just trash,' but I pay for trash service. . . . I should decide where it goes."

              City officials said they've seen a recent uptick in complaints about scavengers prowling the night before trash day, when bins are full of bottles and cans.

              "It was pretty much a given that the economy was driving the increase in scavenging," said Mary Gonzales, the city's project manager, who is overseeing the program.

              "People wanted some sort of solution to this."

              Scavenging has become a source of frustration in the Wilshire Square neighborhood, where Faccou and others complain of the late-night noise and abandoned shopping carts.

              So residents in this community of wide lawns and Revival-style homes began to push back. After several public meetings to devise an anti-scavenger strategy, the city proposed a lockdown in the neighborhood -- mostly to prevent the scavengers' late-night expeditions but also out of a belief by homeowners that they alone should control the destiny of their garbage.

              The pilot program by Waste Management is being tested this summer at a dozen homes on two streets. The neighborhood is just one of a few nationwide that have started locking up curbside bins.

              As in other cities, it's against the law in Santa Ana for anyone but the property owner or trash hauler to remove items from recycling carts once they are curbside.

              Signs atop bins spell it out: STOP. It's against the law to take recyclables out of the containers and Scavenging is a crime!

              For Faccou, scavenging is degrading her quality of life.

              "They come through at 10:30, 11, 12:30 at night with this clankety clankety clank clank, and they get the dogs going," she said. "We used to turn a blind eye to it, but for the last three years it's been escalating."

              Whereas she used to wait until she heard the rumble of the approaching truck before wheeling her gray bin to the curb, "now I feel more secure," she said.

              Locks are often used to protect commercial recycling and trash containers from dumpster divers and scavengers, but only recently have they been engineered for residential purposes.

              The locking bin used in Santa Ana was first designed as a bear-proof container, said Shawn Kruse, a product development manager for supplier Rehrig Pacific, but "it couldn't stand up to that level of abuse."

              San Bernardino is testing locks to keep trash from spilling out of containers at a dozen homes in a particularly windy neighborhood.

              The city of Los Angeles has considered locks to curb scavenging but hasn't found anything practical. Oceanside has installed anti-scavenging locks on the receptacles at its beaches and harbor, albeit reluctantly.

              "We don't want to be known as the city that locks public recycling containers," said Colleen Foster, management analyst for Oceanside's solid waste and recycling division. "What's important is diversion, getting it away from landfills."

              Not everyone in the Santa Ana neighborhood is sold on the idea.

              Rigo Castro, a 42-year-old carpenter, doesn't see what the fuss is about.

              He sees scavengers pushing grocery carts at night, but "I don't mind," he said. He doubts whether most people consider the scavenging enough of an intrusion to put their recyclables on lockdown.

              Scavengers, for their part, seem to shrug it off. Or adapt.

              Jose Santos, 36, a homeless man who collects bottles and cans in the neighborhood, said the locks haven't deterred him. If he encounters one, he just moves on to the next house or digs through the trash, where people sometimes mistakenly toss glass and plastic.

              On a recent trash pickup day, he was pushing a grocery cart with about $15 worth of bottles and cans -- a night's work -- on his way to a recycling center.

              "There are plenty of good people that even help us out" by leaving bottles and cans out for him or giving him money to eat, Santos said. "So I'm not concerned."

              Lucy Bateson, 62, one of Santa Ana's anti-scavenging crusaders, hopes the locks result in a calmer neighborhood, one where she isn't afraid of strangers coming onto her property to score bottles or cans.

              "Maybe the locking cans will be the answer. It gives you a level of comfort putting it out there," Bateson said. "No matter what anybody says, it's not trash. It has value."
               
               
              ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ****

              From the Los Angeles Times
              Editorial
              Santa Ana locks its trash cans
              Have we become so hard-hearted that we deny the homeless even our trash?
               
              June 20, 2009

              In Santa Ana, the city has agreed to place locks on outdoor recycling bins for a dozen neighbors in the Wilshire Square district. The devices, as Times staff writer Tony Barboza reported, were designed to keep bears out of trash cans in Alaska, but there aren't any bears in Santa Ana. Nor are the locks intended to thwart native critters such as raccoons, opossums, ravens or coyotes.

              Somewhere along the line, the city and the neighbors lost sight of the fact that the scavengers targeted by their locking-bin pilot program aren't animals at all but a much more vulnerable species -- homeless human beings, for whom discarded plastic and glass are a last-resort source of sustenance.

              The locks are being tested at the request of residents who lobbied for city protection from the homeless, who were raiding their trash and recycling bins for items with refund value. To be sure, this kind of dumpster diving (or bin burgling) is a nuisance. Residents complain of frightening early morning encounters with homeless men near their driveways or of being awakened at night by barking dogs and the loud clanks of glass bottles.

              What's more, bin burgling can have a small but real cost, which is why it's considered a crime in most cities. Santa Ana contracts with hauler Waste Management, which profits from the recyclables it collects. The "theft" of these items comes at the expense of the contractor rather than the city, but if the losses are significant, it could result in higher trash rates for residents. Waste Management is covering the expense of the new bins, which might be placed at homes in other parts of the city if the test is successful.

              Despite the nuisances, in the grand scheme of things, it's hard to begrudge homeless men and women the pennies they're able to collect from discarded recyclables. For the homeowners who toss them away, the redemption value of containers isn't worth the inconvenience of hauling them to a collection center, yet to the desperately poor they can be a lifeline.

              California has been particularly unkind to its homeless population, which swelled after the mid-1960s when the state ended most involuntary incarceration for the mentally ill. Homeless services have never come close to meeting the demand throughout the state, and the current government budget crisis is reducing services even as the recession causes the number of indigent people to soar.

              A century or two from now, historians may look back at a society so hardhearted that it sends its misfits to live in the streets and then takes steps to ensure that they can't even live off its trash, and wonder at the primitiveness of 21st century man.
               

              --- On Thu, 10/8/09, markvollinger@ rocketmail. com <markvollinger@ rocketmail. com> wrote:

              From: markvollinger@ rocketmail. com <markvollinger@ rocketmail. com>
              Subject: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors
              To: LVNA90004@yahoogrou ps.com
              Date: Thursday, October 8, 2009, 10:31 PM

               

              This evening's meeting with Joe Pelayo, one of the LVNA Police Liaisons was a good first start. I will write a short piece for the Chronicle. We did get one very large wake up call from our neighbors.

              The Recycle Bin
              The blue bin is now the Burglar access to the street, our Cars and Homes. Bin rummaging with a shopping cart is the cover.

              Car thieves with carts are checking for unlocked car doors to rifle immediately or spot valuables for a later window smash entry. Police in Olympic found 8 out of 10 cars UNLOCKED in a random check of an area.

              Burglars (disguised as "recyclers" with a shopping cart) are casing homes and breaking in by walking up driveways, testing windows and doors under the guise of getting to the blue bin. Last Thursday I witnessed an individual walk right up a driveway past the bin and into the back yard, cart parked on the sidewalk.

              RESPONSE
              Take away the cover and cheese. Report all activity. Don't put your Blue Bin out until morning. Do not allow people to rummage through the bins and walk up driveways.

              It is unfortunate, but it will be a start to reduce car and home break-ins. We appreciate Officer Joe Pelayo's time and support.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Christine Albrecht-Buehler
              How will that keep people from looking through the black bins for recyclables? Christine Friedman ________________________________ From: Mark Vollinger
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 12, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                How will that keep people from looking through the black bins for recyclables?
                Christine Friedman




                ________________________________
                From: Mark Vollinger <markvollinger@...>
                To: Teddy Kapur <teddykapur@...>
                Cc: LVNA90004@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Mon, October 12, 2009 12:43:05 PM
                Subject: Re: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors


                Teddy:
                Yes, let's look at that option.
                Immediately, let's keep blue bins off the street and either keep the recycles for the school, scouts or only put them out on Fri AM.

                Mark

                ____________ _________ _________ __
                From: Teddy Kapur <teddykapur@yahoo. com>
                To: LVNA90004@yahoogrou ps.com
                Sent: Friday, October 9, 2009 9:00:55 AM
                Subject: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors


                Mark:

                Thank you for this update. I feel sympathetic for the individuals looking through our bins for a few extra dollars of recyclables, but the safety of our families comes first. I don't believe we should allow people to case our homes and cars under the guise of searching for recyclables.

                Residents in other neighborhoods have started locking curbside bins to counter this type of problem. I've raised this idea at LVNA Board meetings, and the Board would like to get your thoughts about LVNA participating in a similar program.

                The way it works is that the bin can be locked by a resident, and it pops open when the automated arm of the garbage truck turns the bin upside down.

                Attached below are two articles from the Los Angeles Times. The first article describes a pilot program in Santa Ana, and the second article is an editorial criticizing the program. What are your thoughts? Should we try to arrange for a similar pilot program in our neighborhood?

                -- Teddy Kapur

                http://www.latimes com/news/ local/la- me-outthere16- 2009jun16% 2C0%2C2611118. story


                http://www.latimes com/news/ opinion/commenta ry/la-ed- recycling20- 2009jun20, 0,4616451. story


                Santa Ana neighborhood locks up trash to thwart scavengers
                Residents are putting their recyclables into containers designed to withstand the brute strength of bears.By Tony Barboza

                June 16, 2009

                They didn't hold up to the bears of Alaska, but they just might be enough to discourage the scavengers of Santa Ana.

                Fed up with urban foragers who root through neighborhood trash in search of plastic and aluminum, residents of one Santa Ana neighborhood are locking up their recyclables in a container designed to withstand the brute strength and cunning of brown and black bears.

                So it is that Paula Faccou now keeps a key -- right on the same chain with her house key -- to lock up her trash. And when the hauler drives down the street and upends the cart over his truck with an automated arm, the gravity-driven lock pops open.

                Now there's hope on Van Ness Avenue that the bear bins will drive off people like the man Faccou nearly bumped into on her driveway one day as she was carrying in groceries.

                "It just scared the living heck out of me," said the 67-year-old retiree. "A complete stranger, standing outside. It was very brazen, and that's pushing it too much. They have told me, 'What's your problem, lady? It's just trash,' but I pay for trash service. . . . I should decide where it goes."

                City officials said they've seen a recent uptick in complaints about scavengers prowling the night before trash day, when bins are full of bottles and cans.

                "It was pretty much a given that the economy was driving the increase in scavenging," said Mary Gonzales, the city's project manager, who is overseeing the program.

                "People wanted some sort of solution to this."

                Scavenging has become a source of frustration in the Wilshire Square neighborhood, where Faccou and others complain of the late-night noise and abandoned shopping carts.

                So residents in this community of wide lawns and Revival-style homes began to push back. After several public meetings to devise an anti-scavenger strategy, the city proposed a lockdown in the neighborhood -- mostly to prevent the scavengers' late-night expeditions but also out of a belief by homeowners that they alone should control the destiny of their garbage.

                The pilot program by Waste Management is being tested this summer at a dozen homes on two streets. The neighborhood is just one of a few nationwide that have started locking up curbside bins.

                As in other cities, it's against the law in Santa Ana for anyone but the property owner or trash hauler to remove items from recycling carts once they are curbside.

                Signs atop bins spell it out: STOP. It's against the law to take recyclables out of the containers and Scavenging is a crime!

                For Faccou, scavenging is degrading her quality of life.

                "They come through at 10:30, 11, 12:30 at night with this clankety clankety clank clank, and they get the dogs going," she said. "We used to turn a blind eye to it, but for the last three years it's been escalating."

                Whereas she used to wait until she heard the rumble of the approaching truck before wheeling her gray bin to the curb, "now I feel more secure," she said.

                Locks are often used to protect commercial recycling and trash containers from dumpster divers and scavengers, but only recently have they been engineered for residential purposes.

                The locking bin used in Santa Ana was first designed as a bear-proof container, said Shawn Kruse, a product development manager for supplier Rehrig Pacific, but "it couldn't stand up to that level of abuse."

                San Bernardino is testing locks to keep trash from spilling out of containers at a dozen homes in a particularly windy neighborhood.

                The city of Los Angeles has considered locks to curb scavenging but hasn't found anything practical. Oceanside has installed anti-scavenging locks on the receptacles at its beaches and harbor, albeit reluctantly.

                "We don't want to be known as the city that locks public recycling containers," said Colleen Foster, management analyst for Oceanside's solid waste and recycling division. "What's important is diversion, getting it away from landfills."

                Not everyone in the Santa Ana neighborhood is sold on the idea.

                Rigo Castro, a 42-year-old carpenter, doesn't see what the fuss is about.

                He sees scavengers pushing grocery carts at night, but "I don't mind," he said. He doubts whether most people consider the scavenging enough of an intrusion to put their recyclables on lockdown.

                Scavengers, for their part, seem to shrug it off. Or adapt.

                Jose Santos, 36, a homeless man who collects bottles and cans in the neighborhood, said the locks haven't deterred him. If he encounters one, he just moves on to the next house or digs through the trash, where people sometimes mistakenly toss glass and plastic.

                On a recent trash pickup day, he was pushing a grocery cart with about $15 worth of bottles and cans -- a night's work -- on his way to a recycling center.

                "There are plenty of good people that even help us out" by leaving bottles and cans out for him or giving him money to eat, Santos said. "So I'm not concerned."

                Lucy Bateson, 62, one of Santa Ana's anti-scavenging crusaders, hopes the locks result in a calmer neighborhood, one where she isn't afraid of strangers coming onto her property to score bottles or cans.

                "Maybe the locking cans will be the answer. It gives you a level of comfort putting it out there," Bateson said. "No matter what anybody says, it's not trash. It has value."


                ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ****

                From the Los Angeles Times
                Editorial
                Santa Ana locks its trash cans
                Have we become so hard-hearted that we deny the homeless even our trash?

                June 20, 2009

                In Santa Ana, the city has agreed to place locks on outdoor recycling bins for a dozen neighbors in the Wilshire Square district. The devices, as Times staff writer Tony Barboza reported, were designed to keep bears out of trash cans in Alaska, but there aren't any bears in Santa Ana. Nor are the locks intended to thwart native critters such as raccoons, opossums, ravens or coyotes.

                Somewhere along the line, the city and the neighbors lost sight of the fact that the scavengers targeted by their locking-bin pilot program aren't animals at all but a much more vulnerable species -- homeless human beings, for whom discarded plastic and glass are a last-resort source of sustenance.

                The locks are being tested at the request of residents who lobbied for city protection from the homeless, who were raiding their trash and recycling bins for items with refund value. To be sure, this kind of dumpster diving (or bin burgling) is a nuisance. Residents complain of frightening early morning encounters with homeless men near their driveways or of being awakened at night by barking dogs and the loud clanks of glass bottles.

                What's more, bin burgling can have a small but real cost, which is why it's considered a crime in most cities. Santa Ana contracts with hauler Waste Management, which profits from the recyclables it collects. The "theft" of these items comes at the expense of the contractor rather than the city, but if the losses are significant, it could result in higher trash rates for residents. Waste Management is covering the expense of the new bins, which might be placed at homes in other parts of the city if the test is successful.

                Despite the nuisances, in the grand scheme of things, it's hard to begrudge homeless men and women the pennies they're able to collect from discarded recyclables. For the homeowners who toss them away, the redemption value of containers isn't worth the inconvenience of hauling them to a collection center, yet to the desperately poor they can be a lifeline.

                California has been particularly unkind to its homeless population, which swelled after the mid-1960s when the state ended most involuntary incarceration for the mentally ill. Homeless services have never come close to meeting the demand throughout the state, and the current government budget crisis is reducing services even as the recession causes the number of indigent people to soar.

                A century or two from now, historians may look back at a society so hardhearted that it sends its misfits to live in the streets and then takes steps to ensure that they can't even live off its trash, and wonder at the primitiveness of 21st century man.


                --- On Thu, 10/8/09, markvollinger@ rocketmail. com <markvollinger@ rocketmail. com> wrote:

                From: markvollinger@ rocketmail. com <markvollinger@ rocketmail. com>
                Subject: [LVNA90004] LVNA Meeting - Police and Neighbors
                To: LVNA90004@yahoogrou ps.com
                Date: Thursday, October 8, 2009, 10:31 PM



                This evening's meeting with Joe Pelayo, one of the LVNA Police Liaisons was a good first start. I will write a short piece for the Chronicle. We did get one very large wake up call from our neighbors.

                The Recycle Bin
                The blue bin is now the Burglar access to the street, our Cars and Homes. Bin rummaging with a shopping cart is the cover.

                Car thieves with carts are checking for unlocked car doors to rifle immediately or spot valuables for a later window smash entry. Police in Olympic found 8 out of 10 cars UNLOCKED in a random check of an area.

                Burglars (disguised as "recyclers" with a shopping cart) are casing homes and breaking in by walking up driveways, testing windows and doors under the guise of getting to the blue bin. Last Thursday I witnessed an individual walk right up a driveway past the bin and into the back yard, cart parked on the sidewalk.

                RESPONSE
                Take away the cover and cheese. Report all activity. Don't put your Blue Bin out until morning. Do not allow people to rummage through the bins and walk up driveways.

                It is unfortunate, but it will be a start to reduce car and home break-ins. We appreciate Officer Joe Pelayo's time and support.

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