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Important Water Use Update from the city...

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  • kentrisk
    Please read... Charlie D 1/8/2008 10:10 PM DATE: January 08, 2008 22:09:14 PST FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE JANUARY 8, 2008 Contact:
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 9, 2008
      Please read...

      Charlie D

      <Joseph.Ramallo@...> 1/8/2008 10:10 PM >>>
      DATE: January 08, 2008 22:09:14 PST
      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

      JANUARY 8,
      2008

      Contact: LADWP Public Affairs, (213) 367-1361
      WITH RECENT RAIN, LADWP URGES CUSTOMERS TO SAVE WATER
      BY TURNING OFF
      SPRINKLERS

      WATER SUPPLY STILL THREATENED BY DROUGHT
      AND COURT
      RULING DESPITE RAIN AND SNOW

      LOS ANGELES - Despite the winter
      storm that dumped up to eight feet of snow in the Eastern Sierra-the
      watershed that feeds the City of Los Angeles' two aqueducts and
      supplies
      about half of the City's water during a normal year - the Los Angeles
      Department of Water and Power (LADWP) reminded customers there is
      still
      a serious water shortage facing the region, and urged them to turn
      off
      their sprinklers or other outdoor irrigation systems to help conserve
      the water supply.

      "We're not out of the woods yet and we cannot
      be lulled into a false sense of security by these storms," said
      David Nahai, LADWP General Manager and CEO. We are dependent on
      watersheds that are experiencing significant pressures and weather
      that
      has been terribly unreliable. We continue to urge our customers to
      save
      water as much as possible, especially during the winter months when
      it
      is easy to do so."

      LADWP conservation experts estimate that the
      average residential customer would save about 800 gallons by not
      watering their landscapes for a week. Los Angeles received enough
      rain
      during the latest series of storms to keep grass, plants and other
      foliage happy for several days.

      "Right now our lawns and
      landscapes are saturated from the wet weather, so let's take
      advantage
      of that. We strongly encourage residents and business owners to use
      this
      opportunity to turn off your sprinklers," said Jim McDaniel,
      chief
      operating officer for LADWP's Water System. "Let the storm
      water
      soak in and save our drinking water at the same time."

      LADWP
      also urged customers to adjust their automatic timers such that
      sprinklers operate no more than twice each week, since cooler
      temperatures greatly reduce landscape water needs. Customers should
      also
      consider purchasing "smart" weather-based irrigation
      controllers-new technology that adjusts irrigation schedules based on
      local weather conditions.

      The recent storm dumped six to eight feet
      of snow on Mammoth Pass, equating to approximately 8 inches of water
      content, bringing the current water content total to about 16 inches;
      however, that amount is still only about a third of the water content
      level produced by Eastern Sierra snowpack during a normal year. In
      addition, while the overall snowpack level in the Eastern Sierra is
      higher than normal for this date, there are still three months to go
      in
      our snowpack measurement period and we need more snow to fall in the
      Eastern Sierra.

      LADWP utilizes snowpack data from the Eastern Sierra
      to calculate how much water Los Angeles can expect to receive via the
      Los Angeles Aqueduct during the next fiscal year. For planning
      purposes,
      the Department projects the next year's water supply based on the
      snowpack level as of April 1 each year. The snowpack level can vary
      dramatically by then, depending on the weather, and affect the amount
      of
      water supply available for the following year.

      In addition to
      snowpack levels in the Eastern Sierra, there are other pressures
      facing
      traditional water supplies. The Colorado River has completed its
      eighth
      year of record drought, and a federal court order has restricted
      pumping
      operations in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to protect the
      threatened
      Delta smelt.

      LADWP also reminded customers of the prohibited water
      uses, which are in effect throughout the City. As defined by
      existing
      City ordinance, LADWP customers cannot:

      Use water on hard surfaces
      such as sidewalks, walkways, driveways, or parking areas (this was
      amended by Ordinance in 1991 to allow hose flushing for public
      health);
      Water lawns between 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., April 1 to September 30 and
      between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., October 1 - March 31;

      Allow excess water
      from sprinklers to flood gutters;

      Use water to clean, fill, or
      maintain decorative fountains unless the water is part of a recycling
      system;

      Serve water to customers in eating establishments, unless
      requested; and

      Allow leaks to go unattended.

      Customers can also
      take advantage of numerous incentives programs that provide rebates
      for
      purchasing water efficient technology. LADWP has recently increased
      its
      rebate incentives for the following programs:

      Residential clothes
      washer (from $150 to $250)

      High efficiency toilet (from $205 to
      $300)

      High efficiency urinal (from $200 to $400)

      Cooling tower
      pH control (from $1,900 to $3,000)

      Smart irrigation controller (from
      $630 to $1,000 per acre controlled)

      Technical Assistance Program
      (TAP) incentives (from $1.25 per thousand gallons saved/$50,000 cap
      to
      $1.50 per thousand gallons saved/$100,000 cap)



      For further
      information on LADWP's water conservation tips and rebate programs,
      please visit http://www.ladwp.com/.



      The Los Angeles Department
      of Water and Power was established more than 100 years ago to
      provide a
      reliable and safe water and electric supply to the City of Los
      Angeles
      residents and businesses. The LADWP serves approximately 1.4 million
      electric customers and 680,000 water service customers. For more
      information, log on to http://www.ladwp.com/.


      For more information
      contact:
      Joseph Ramallo
      L.A. Dept. of Water & Power
      voice: (213)
      367-1361
      LADWP
      News Room
      http://www.piersystem.com/go/site/1475/
      Visit this link to unsubscribe:
      http://www.piersystem.com/unsubscribe.cfm?
      cid=1475&email=Carolyn.Ramsay@
      lacity.org
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