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Re: [LR_Cos] Fabric for Bilbos robe from The Hobbit

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  • girlspurplegreen
    WOW - I am all excited to have a go at this dressing gown now too! I have to make a Gollum, Galadriel (from the Hobbit) and Arwen (thinking maybe coronation)
    Message 1 of 27 , Feb 18, 2013
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      WOW - I am all excited to have a go at this dressing gown now too! I have to make a Gollum, Galadriel (from the Hobbit) and Arwen (thinking maybe coronation) in the next little bit and then it will be costume season for my 3 dance girls - BUT I could work on this inbetween and make it for my husband in September.

      Thanks for the inspiration! Thrift shops (we call them op-shops) here I come!

      By the way - I'm new to the group - so I had better pop over and introduce myself in the messages...
      >
    • Cat Devereaux
      ... Banyan and Dressing Gown used in the old fashion sense are really about the same. He is wearing his shirt and probably trousers... which means he is
      Message 2 of 27 , Feb 18, 2013
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        On 2/18/2013 3:42 PM, john Carlson wrote:
        > Good on you Judy for ferreting that out for us. If the professor calls
        > it a dressing gown, than that is good enough for me. And the dressing
        > gown is more like a bathrobe ; )
        Banyan and Dressing Gown used in the "old fashion" sense are really
        about the same. He is wearing his shirt and probably trousers... which
        means he is probably in"undress". Gentlemen didn't just wear shirt
        sleeves... it wasn't quite propper. (Think Doulton Abby.) (Yea, LOTR
        violates that a lot, but that's kinda where it comes from.)

        We'll be using the term Dressing Gown..

        More info:
        http://thecostumersmanifesto.com/costumeoldsite/history/100pages/BANYAN.HTM
        Pattern:
        http://thecostumersmanifesto.com/costumeoldsite/history/leloir/vol10/30_banyanpattern.jpg

        However, Biblo's sleeves are set in... so it's not exactly the pattern.

        -Cat-
      • john Carlson
        Thanks Cat. How about the couple of Hobbits on page 23, upper right corner in the chronicles. Just about perfect for 1800 (from the knees up). Sent from my
        Message 3 of 27 , Feb 18, 2013
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          Thanks Cat. How about the couple of Hobbits on page 23, upper right corner in the chronicles. Just about perfect for 1800 (from the knees up).

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Feb 18, 2013, at 4:40 PM, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:

          > On 2/18/2013 3:42 PM, john Carlson wrote:
          >> Good on you Judy for ferreting that out for us. If the professor calls
          >> it a dressing gown, than that is good enough for me. And the dressing
          >> gown is more like a bathrobe ; )
          > Banyan and Dressing Gown used in the "old fashion" sense are really
          > about the same. He is wearing his shirt and probably trousers... which
          > means he is probably in"undress". Gentlemen didn't just wear shirt
          > sleeves... it wasn't quite propper. (Think Doulton Abby.) (Yea, LOTR
          > violates that a lot, but that's kinda where it comes from.)
          >
          > We'll be using the term Dressing Gown..
          >
          > More info:
          > http://thecostumersmanifesto.com/costumeoldsite/history/100pages/BANYAN.HTM
          > Pattern:
          > http://thecostumersmanifesto.com/costumeoldsite/history/leloir/vol10/30_banyanpattern.jpg
          >
          > However, Biblo's sleeves are set in... so it's not exactly the pattern.
          >
          > -Cat-
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Cat Devereaux
          ... The extras seems to mix eras. Once we get to see more the the Hobbit scenes (hopefully in film 2), we can get the flavor. Right now it s a mix. In LOTR,
          Message 4 of 27 , Feb 18, 2013
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            On 2/18/2013 5:11 PM, john Carlson wrote:
            > hanks Cat. How about the couple of Hobbits on page 23, upper right
            > corner in the chronicles. Just about perfect for 1800 (from the knees up).
            The extras seems to mix eras. Once we get to see more the the Hobbit
            scenes (hopefully in film 2), we can get the flavor. Right now it's a
            mix. In LOTR, the gals were more Ren, this time they appear to be more
            colonial (yea, real general grouping). The guys also seem to move a
            bit. Up on Trousers since they're mostly NOT button fly, though some of
            the bits seem to go backwards and look more colonial, or right afterwards.

            Sometimes when we look at every single frame we can capture of the
            extras, we get the wrong emphasis. So... I'm kinda thinking the verdict
            is still out ... just a bit.

            -Cat-
          • girlspurplegreen
            Once we get to see more the the Hobbit scenes (hopefully in film 2), we can get the flavor. Hopefully we may not have to wait for film 2 - the Chronicles
            Message 5 of 27 , Feb 18, 2013
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              "Once we get to see more the the Hobbit
              scenes (hopefully in film 2), we can get the flavor."

              Hopefully we may not have to wait for film 2 - the Chronicles book shows heaps of stuff we never saw in the first movie around Hobbiton and the Green Dragon and the Old Took's Party (perhaps they are party dresses on pages 22 & 23 as they do seem a bit fancier than what I saw in the movie)and when I listened to the soundtrack the second track is extended and would be a possible spot in the movie where we'd see more of the Hobbits.
              Having said all that, I think the extended dvd is only being released a couple months before movie 2 anyway.
            • john Carlson
              Totally agree. I noticed the change on the trousers too. It s just fun to see the creative bones of the designing process. My daughter sure spoiled me with the
              Message 6 of 27 , Feb 18, 2013
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                Totally agree. I noticed the change on the trousers too. It's just fun to see the creative bones of the designing process. My daughter sure spoiled me with the WETA chronicles book. Such eye candy.


                Sent from my iPhone

                On Feb 18, 2013, at 5:24 PM, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:

                > On 2/18/2013 5:11 PM, john Carlson wrote:
                >> hanks Cat. How about the couple of Hobbits on page 23, upper right
                >> corner in the chronicles. Just about perfect for 1800 (from the knees up).
                > The extras seems to mix eras. Once we get to see more the the Hobbit
                > scenes (hopefully in film 2), we can get the flavor. Right now it's a
                > mix. In LOTR, the gals were more Ren, this time they appear to be more
                > colonial (yea, real general grouping). The guys also seem to move a
                > bit. Up on Trousers since they're mostly NOT button fly, though some of
                > the bits seem to go backwards and look more colonial, or right afterwards.
                >
                > Sometimes when we look at every single frame we can capture of the
                > extras, we get the wrong emphasis. So... I'm kinda thinking the verdict
                > is still out ... just a bit.
                >
                > -Cat-
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Sarah Strong
                that banyan pattern is more like a kimono, with no seam between the sleeve and the body. We can clearly see than Bilbo s dressing gown has a set in sleeve. An
                Message 7 of 27 , Feb 19, 2013
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                  that banyan pattern is more like a kimono, with no seam between the
                  sleeve and the body. We can clearly see than Bilbo's dressing gown has a
                  set in sleeve. An ordinary shawl collar bathrobe pattern will probably
                  do the trick, as long as it has a not-too-dropped shoulder.
                  I looked at the one decent image I could find on line, and it really
                  looks to me like the designer traced out the pattern so as to have full
                  size right and left of everything, then drew the piecing lines on it, to
                  guide the patchwork (as I suggested earlier). I can see groups of
                  patches forming broad, various-width, rows across the sleeve, for
                  instance, and those are then broken up into smaller blocks with
                  different size patches. If I could see the body better it seems like it
                  would probably be about the same. By having that kind of full-size
                  schematic, you can write on each area, which fabric it's going to be, to
                  help keep track as you begin to cut and sew. (remember when you measure
                  the "patches" on the pattern, to add seam allowance all around)
                  If I were doing this project, I would underline each garment piece after
                  the patchwork was done and the seams were pressed open, and probably
                  stitch-in-the-ditch to secure the patchwork to the underlining. Only
                  then would I place the fitted pattern piece to the patchwork and cut out
                  the final piece to be sewn up.


                  On 2/18/2013 7:40 PM, Cat Devereaux wrote:
                  > On 2/18/2013 3:42 PM, john Carlson wrote:
                  > > Good on you Judy for ferreting that out for us. If the professor calls
                  > > it a dressing gown, than that is good enough for me. And the dressing
                  > > gown is more like a bathrobe ; )
                  > Banyan and Dressing Gown used in the "old fashion" sense are really
                  > about the same. He is wearing his shirt and probably trousers... which
                  > means he is probably in"undress". Gentlemen didn't just wear shirt
                  > sleeves... it wasn't quite propper. (Think Downton Abbey.) (Yea, LOTR
                  > violates that a lot, but that's kinda where it comes from.)
                  >
                  > We'll be using the term Dressing Gown..
                  >
                  > More info:
                  > http://thecostumersmanifesto.com/costumeoldsite/history/100pages/BANYAN.HTM
                  > Pattern:
                  > http://thecostumersmanifesto.com/costumeoldsite/history/leloir/vol10/30_banyanpattern.jpg
                  >
                  > However, Biblo's sleeves are set in... so it's not exactly the pattern.
                  >
                  > -Cat-
                  >
                • Sarah Strong
                  here s a blog with a collection of decent images http://songofages.tumblr.com/post/36808400370/i-am-serious-about-making-bilbos-dressing-gown I also found an
                  Message 8 of 27 , Feb 19, 2013
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                    here's a blog with a collection of decent images
                    http://songofages.tumblr.com/post/36808400370/i-am-serious-about-making-bilbos-dressing-gown
                    I also found an interview where Martin Freeman says this was the
                    souvenir he asked for (and got) and yes he wears it around the house. :)


                    On 2/18/2013 5:23 PM, Judy Mitchell wrote:
                    > Both Tolkien and Maskrey call it a 'Dressing Gown'. Here is what the
                    > Hobbit Chronicle has to say about the item:
                    > : Made of many different fabrics, Bilbo's dressing gown is a favourite
                    > with everyone, including actor Martin Freeman. There are silks, wools,
                    > brocades, chenille and velvet. The apparently random patchwork had to be
                    > very carefully mapped out so as not to end up with mathcing blocks of
                    > colour ending up together that could be distracting to the eye."
                    > So... that means the one in the movie was actually pieced out of small
                    > rectangles - but not just velvet, many different fibers & weaves for
                    > texture. occasionally you can find a velvet that's printed to look like
                    > patchwork, but I haven't seen it lately and it wouldn't give the texture
                    > this has. Which means it's entirely up to the OP just how manic/accurate
                    > she wants to go!
                    >
                    > -Judy
                    >
                  • Judy Mitchell
                    if anyone wants more instruction on what I believe you re suggesting, they should google or check youtube for info on paper piecing type of quilting. -Judy
                    Message 9 of 27 , Feb 19, 2013
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                      if anyone wants more instruction on what I believe you're suggesting,
                      they should google or check youtube for info on 'paper piecing' type of
                      quilting.
                      -Judy

                      On 02/19/2013 09:47 AM, Sarah Strong wrote:
                      > that banyan pattern is more like a kimono, with no seam between the
                      > sleeve and the body. We can clearly see than Bilbo's dressing gown has a
                      > set in sleeve. An ordinary shawl collar bathrobe pattern will probably
                      > do the trick, as long as it has a not-too-dropped shoulder.
                      > I looked at the one decent image I could find on line, and it really
                      > looks to me like the designer traced out the pattern so as to have full
                      > size right and left of everything, then drew the piecing lines on it, to
                      > guide the patchwork (as I suggested earlier). I can see groups of
                      > patches forming broad, various-width, rows across the sleeve, for
                      > instance, and those are then broken up into smaller blocks with
                      > different size patches. If I could see the body better it seems like it
                      > would probably be about the same. By having that kind of full-size
                      > schematic, you can write on each area, which fabric it's going to be, to
                      > help keep track as you begin to cut and sew. (remember when you measure
                      > the "patches" on the pattern, to add seam allowance all around)
                      > If I were doing this project, I would underline each garment piece after
                      > the patchwork was done and the seams were pressed open, and probably
                      > stitch-in-the-ditch to secure the patchwork to the underlining. Only
                      > then would I place the fitted pattern piece to the patchwork and cut out
                      > the final piece to be sewn up.
                      >
                    • Sarah Strong
                      Actually I m not sugggesting paper piecing. What I m suggesting is just piecing the fabrics together, *referring* to the sketched layout as a guide. Paper
                      Message 10 of 27 , Feb 19, 2013
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                        Actually I'm not sugggesting paper piecing.
                        What I'm suggesting is just piecing the fabrics together, *referring* to
                        the sketched layout as a guide. Paper piecing quilt blocks is a
                        different process, where the paper gets incorporated into the block. I
                        would NOT use that process for this garment.
                        I WOULD finish the patchwork and the underlining before cutting out the
                        actual sleeve shape, for instance.


                        ----- Original message -----
                        From: Judy Mitchell <judymitch@...>
                        To: LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [LR_Cos] Fabric for Bilbos robe from The Hobbit
                        Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2013 10:16:28 -0500

                        if anyone wants more instruction on what I believe you're suggesting,
                        they should google or check youtube for info on 'paper piecing' type of
                        quilting.
                        -Judy
                      • Judy Mitchell
                        But you don t leave the paper on there forever, you rip it off as you progress. I still think it might be an easier way to make sure you get all the blocks
                        Message 11 of 27 , Feb 19, 2013
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                          But you don't leave the paper on there forever, you rip it off as you
                          progress. I still think it might be an easier way to make sure you get
                          all the blocks where you want them and the right size. Either way, it's
                          still a lot of work, but will look amazing when it's finished.

                          -Judy


                          On 02/19/2013 12:43 PM, Sarah Strong wrote:
                          > Actually I'm not sugggesting paper piecing.
                          > What I'm suggesting is just piecing the fabrics together, *referring* to
                          > the sketched layout as a guide. Paper piecing quilt blocks is a
                          > different process, where the paper gets incorporated into the block. I
                          > would NOT use that process for this garment.
                          > I WOULD finish the patchwork and the underlining before cutting out the
                          > actual sleeve shape, for instance.
                          >
                        • Sarah Strong
                          Nope, not the technique I d use for this type of patchwork. I ve done paper piecing, it s a different animal. S ... From: Judy Mitchell
                          Message 12 of 27 , Feb 19, 2013
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                            Nope, not the technique I'd use for this type of patchwork. I've done
                            paper piecing, it's a different animal.

                            S





                            ----- Original message -----

                            From: Judy Mitchell <[1]judymitch@...>

                            To: [2]LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com

                            Subject: Re: [LR_Cos] Fabric for Bilbos robe from The Hobbit

                            Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2013 13:07:39 -0500





                            But you don't leave the paper on there forever, you rip it off as you
                            progress. I still think it might be an easier way to make sure you get
                            all the blocks where you want them and the right size. Either way, it's
                            still a lot of work, but will look amazing when it's finished.
                            -Judy
                            On 02/19/2013 12:43 PM, Sarah Strong wrote:
                            > Actually I'm not sugggesting paper piecing.
                            > What I'm suggesting is just piecing the fabrics together, *referring*
                            to
                            > the sketched layout as a guide. Paper piecing quilt blocks is a
                            > different process, where the paper gets incorporated into the block.
                            I
                            > would NOT use that process for this garment.
                            > I WOULD finish the patchwork and the underlining before cutting out
                            the
                            > actual sleeve shape, for instance.
                            >




                            --

                            Sarah Strong

                            sarahstrong13@...

                            References

                            1. mailto:judymitch@...
                            2. mailto:LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com
                            3. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LOTR_Costume/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJxY3VzczRuBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzQ3NDE2ODAEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MjE4ODExBG1zZ0lkAzYxNTUyBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTM2MTI5NzI2NA--?act=reply&messageNum=61552
                            4. mailto:judymitch@...?subject=Re%3A%20%5BLR_Cos%5D%20Fabric%20for%20Bilbos%20robe%20from%20The%20Hobbit
                            5. mailto:LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com?subject=Re%3A%20%5BLR_Cos%5D%20Fabric%20for%20Bilbos%20robe%20from%20The%20Hobbit
                            6. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LOTR_Costume/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJlNTVscmcwBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzQ3NDE2ODAEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MjE4ODExBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTM2MTI5NzI2NA--
                            7. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LOTR_Costume/message/61530;_ylc=X3oDMTM2cTI3MW8zBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzQ3NDE2ODAEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MjE4ODExBG1zZ0lkAzYxNTUyBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTM2MTI5NzI2NAR0cGNJZAM2MTUzMA--
                            8. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LOTR_Costume/members;_ylc=X3oDMTJmbXNyZzk2BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzQ3NDE2ODAEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MjE4ODExBHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZtYnJzBHN0aW1lAzEzNjEyOTcyNjQ-?o=6
                            9. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LOTR_Costume;_ylc=X3oDMTJldDZpaGtnBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzQ3NDE2ODAEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MjE4ODExBHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTM2MTI5NzI2NA--
                            10. http://groups.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTJkOTlibTRlBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzQ3NDE2ODAEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MjE4ODExBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxMzYxMjk3MjY0
                            11. mailto:LOTR_Costume-traditional@yahoogroups.com?subject=Change%20Delivery%20Format:%20Traditional
                            12. mailto:LOTR_Costume-digest@yahoogroups.com?subject=Email%20Delivery:%20Digest
                            13. mailto:LOTR_Costume-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe
                            14. http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                            15. mailto:ygroupsnotifications@yahoogroups.com?subject=Feedback%20on%20the%20redesigned%20individual%20mail%20v1


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • bonmothma
                            Dressing gown is used in modern-day England, if Harry Potter is any indication. Bonnie Half-Elven
                            Message 13 of 27 , Feb 19, 2013
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                              "Dressing gown" is used in modern-day England, if Harry Potter is any indication.

                              Bonnie Half-Elven

                              --- In LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > On 2/18/2013 3:42 PM, john Carlson wrote:
                              > > Good on you Judy for ferreting that out for us. If the professor calls
                              > > it a dressing gown, than that is good enough for me. And the dressing
                              > > gown is more like a bathrobe ; )
                              > Banyan and Dressing Gown used in the "old fashion" sense are really
                              > about the same. He is wearing his shirt and probably trousers... which
                              > means he is probably in"undress". Gentlemen didn't just wear shirt
                              > sleeves... it wasn't quite propper. (Think Doulton Abby.) (Yea, LOTR
                              > violates that a lot, but that's kinda where it comes from.)
                              >
                              > We'll be using the term Dressing Gown..
                              > -Cat-
                              >
                            • girlspurplegreen
                              I found this image which doesn t show the full length of the garment but what it does show is nice and clear. The texture is gorgeous.
                              Message 14 of 27 , Feb 20, 2013
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                                I found this image which doesn't show the full length of the garment but what it does show is nice and clear. The texture is gorgeous.

                                http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mec5gsSppg1r8lanyo1_1280.jpg

                                I've read through all the messages but am getting mixed up with who is making the gown - but are you thinking the best way is to "make your fabric first" taking into account the straight cuts of the body length finishing on the edge of the fabric, but then cutting out the set in sleeves (as it looks like in the photo)?

                                I remember first seeing the gown in one of Peter Jackson's video blogs - I thought it looked ghastly but they went on to explain that with the 48frames per second they had to look at colours and patterns differently so it would appear "right" on the camera. I am a little concerned that mine may just end up a bit ghastly if I don't get the colours right!
                              • Sarah Strong
                                that s an excellent image. You can see how the smaller patches are grouped into blocks or strips across the arm, for instance. Ha, I think I m getting mixed up
                                Message 15 of 27 , Feb 20, 2013
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                                  that's an excellent image. You can see how the smaller patches are
                                  grouped into blocks or strips across the arm, for instance.

                                  Ha, I think I'm getting mixed up too, might get drawn into this when
                                  I'm done with what I'm in the middle of now! :D



                                  Yes, make the fabric first, then cut the pieces. You obviously don't
                                  have to make 45" wide yard goods, just sections big enough for each of
                                  the garment pieces. But you do want to make pieces that are going to
                                  be adequate to trim out each sleeve, front, etc. Any time you are
                                  dealing with a multitude of seams across a garment piece (like this, or
                                  with many rows of pin tucks, or a lot of embroidery that might scrunch
                                  the fabric up a tiny bit) you always want to have an intact pattern
                                  piece to use after the many seams are finished, so the final garment
                                  piece actually matches the pattern piece. This is especially important
                                  with a truly fitted garment. This is a bathrobe, so the place it's
                                  going to matter most, is in matching the sleeve cap to the armscye.
                                  Assuming you have made a muslin (or flannel, or terrycloth....) test of
                                  your pattern, you want your patchwork to fit the same way.



                                  Colors and fabrics... here we come to the perennial conversation about
                                  whether your goal is something that (how exactly?) replicates the
                                  garment as it hangs in the wardrobe trailer, as it appears on screen,
                                  or what will look best on you with your particular coloring. For wowing
                                  everyone at a costume event, maybe 1 or 2. For enjoying at home
                                  forever, maybe 3rd option is best.



                                  As I fell asleep imagining myself into this project, I wondered if I
                                  would go so far as to use Chanel type couture construction like I saw
                                  in a Threads magazine article... where the lining is basted to the
                                  fashion fabric up to within an inch or so of the seam lines. The
                                  fashion fabric is seamed together and then the lining seam allowances
                                  are tucked in and hand sewn. For a patchwork dressing gown like this,
                                  it would keep it nice and light, for the underlining to also be the
                                  lining... maybe a nice charmeuse... mmmmm yum. :)



                                  ----- Original message -----

                                  From: girlspurplegreen <[1]no_reply@yahoogroups.com>

                                  To: [2]LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com

                                  Subject: Re: [LR_Cos] Fabric for Bilbos robe from The Hobbit

                                  Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2013 08:51:23 -0000





                                  I found this image which doesn't show the full length of the garment
                                  but what it does show is nice and clear. The texture is gorgeous.
                                  [3]http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mec5gsSppg1r8lanyo1_1280.jpg
                                  I've read through all the messages but am getting mixed up with who is
                                  making the gown - but are you thinking the best way is to "make your
                                  fabric first" taking into account the straight cuts of the body length
                                  finishing on the edge of the fabric, but then cutting out the set in
                                  sleeves (as it looks like in the photo)?
                                  I remember first seeing the gown in one of Peter Jackson's video blogs
                                  - I thought it looked ghastly but they went on to explain that with the
                                  48frames per second they had to look at colours and patterns
                                  differently so it would appear "right" on the camera. I am a little
                                  concerned that mine may just end up a bit ghastly if I don't get the
                                  colours right!




                                  --

                                  Sarah Strong

                                  sarahstrong13@...

                                  References

                                  1. mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com
                                  2. mailto:LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com
                                  3. http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mec5gsSppg1r8lanyo1_1280.jpg
                                  4. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LOTR_Costume/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJxYmczNzlzBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzQ3NDE2ODAEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MjE4ODExBG1zZ0lkAzYxNTU1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTM2MTM1MDI4Ng--?act=reply&messageNum=61555
                                  5. mailto:?subject=Re%3A%20%5BLR_Cos%5D%20Fabric%20for%20Bilbos%20robe%20from%20The%20Hobbit
                                  6. mailto:LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com?subject=Re%3A%20%5BLR_Cos%5D%20Fabric%20for%20Bilbos%20robe%20from%20The%20Hobbit
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                                • Sarah
                                  oh, and while shopping the thrift store for appealing fabrics, don t forget to look at the neckties, some of them might be in good brocades. Old neck ties are
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Feb 20, 2013
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                                    oh, and while shopping the thrift store for appealing fabrics, don't forget to look at the neckties, some of them might be in good brocades. Old neck ties are also great for piping, like along the edges of the shawl collar and the cuffs.
                                  • Cat Devereaux
                                    ... Ties are already on the bias... so you get full use of the length. -Cat-
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Feb 20, 2013
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                                      On 2/20/2013 8:41 PM, Sarah wrote:
                                      > oh, and while shopping the thrift store for appealing fabrics, don't
                                      > forget to look at the neckties, some of them might be in good
                                      > brocades. Old neck ties are also great for piping, like along the
                                      > edges of the shawl collar and the cuffs.
                                      Ties are already on the bias... so you get full use of the length.

                                      -Cat-
                                    • girlspurplegreen
                                      WOW Sarah - now I am getting super excited! Need to get some things out the way asap so I can start! And great tip about the ties Sarah and Cat - I wouldn t
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Feb 20, 2013
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                                        WOW Sarah - now I am getting super excited! Need to get some things out the way asap so I can start!
                                        And great tip about the ties Sarah and Cat - I wouldn't have thought of that. In fact I should check my husband's stash of ties - I may be able to find a sentimental one of his to incorporate into the project. Thank goodness his birthday/father's day is a while off...

                                        >
                                      • Sarah Strong
                                        The Threads issue with the Chanel jacket construction article is #121, Oct/Nov 2005. Your library may have it if you don t collect the magazine yourself. There
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Feb 21, 2013
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                                          The Threads issue with the Chanel jacket construction article is #121,
                                          Oct/Nov 2005. Your library may have it if you don't collect the magazine
                                          yourself. There are probably other couture books with the same info,
                                          this is just the one that pops into my mind.
                                          I too am feeling the urge to begin going through the back of my closet
                                          and local thrift shops and start collecting ingredients. :)

                                          On 2/21/2013 1:35 AM, girlspurplegreen wrote:
                                          > WOW Sarah - now I am getting super excited! Need to get some things out
                                          > the way asap so I can start!
                                          > And great tip about the ties Sarah and Cat - I wouldn't have thought of
                                          > that. In fact I should check my husband's stash of ties - I may be able
                                          > to find a sentimental one of his to incorporate into the project. Thank
                                          > goodness his birthday/father's day is a while off...
                                          >
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