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Re: [LR_Cos] Re: Oh, I just did a BAD thing...Update & some Kid's Cloak lessons learned

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  • Cat Devereaux
    Please keep track of your notes... for when we get the software straightened out. Look at these as muslin test for the real stuff. For the neck stretching
    Message 1 of 23 , Dec 1, 2010
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      Please keep track of your notes... for when we get the software
      straightened out.

      Look at these as "muslin" test for the real stuff.


      For the neck stretching out. Put some seam binding on the underside
      before you turn it over. Or at least some cord.

      For fastening. An old SCA trick is to stitch on a skirt hook, or
      hooks. Then put a fancy, but not sturdy broach over the area so it
      looks like the cool piece is actually supporting the fastening.... and
      the pin stays better in place.

      If that piece where you're pinning is stretching out... Iron on some
      craft weight interfacing to a piece of black cotton fabric (or if you've
      got the non-iron on, just grab a piece). Lay down that mesh of fabric
      w/ the interfacing in the center... Lay the piece down with the cloak
      edges, trim it like making a facing. Then treat all 3 layers and one -
      fashion fabric on top, interfacing as a middle, then the black. Turn
      under like before. (You're flat lining, just the bits where there's stress.

      And if your fabric is shear or loose weaved, ya may need black on both
      sides of the sandwich.

      -Cat-
    • Carol Lynn
      ... I ve had one of these for five or six years (since the traveling exhibit was in Indianapolis) and while I have been treating it carefully, I have been
      Message 2 of 23 , Dec 5, 2010
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        On Nov 2, 2010, at 12:45 AM, Cat Devereaux wrote:

        > Lord of the Rings Regular Authentic
        > Grey Fellowship Cloak scarf

        I've had one of these for five or six years (since the traveling exhibit was in Indianapolis) and while I have been treating it carefully, I have been wearing it. I was always a trifle disappointed in how it looked compared to what the cloaks looked like in the movies. It always seemed a little too shiny and hard and flat but it was so very cool, that I wore it anyway. It finally got to the point where it had to be cleaned. I dithered, since last spring, on whether to have it dry cleaned or to try and wash it. I finally threw caution to the winds and washed it gently by hand in warm-ish water and tumble dried it on the no-heat setting. Well, lo and behold! It fulled itself just a trifle. It now has a much more three dimensional, lighter, look and texture and finally looks *exactly* like the material I saw on screen. I am happy.

        Wool is wonderful. Why didn't I do this five years ago?

        Gwynnyd



        Carol Lynn
        carollynn@...

        "I would draw some of the great tales in fullness, and leave many only placed in the scheme, and sketched. The cycles should be linked to a majestic whole, and yet leave scope for other minds and hands, wielding paint and music and drama."

        JRR Tolkien, Letter #131



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Furqueron
        Well met Carol Lynn, I was just exchanging emails with Kiri the other day on the wool order. She had asked if I wanted it finished or unfinished.
        Message 3 of 23 , Dec 5, 2010
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          Well met Carol Lynn,

          I was just exchanging emails with Kiri the other day on the wool order. She had asked if I wanted it "finished" or unfinished. Apparently they press or do something to it to give it a very smooth silken type finish. "Finished" is what they do to the scarves, but not the cloaks. (BTW, I admire you for wearing the scarf...mine is destined for a shadow box along with a brooch...but we'll definitely wear the cloaks we make!).

          I'm still debating on finished or unfinished...kids will be wearing the cloaks and we all know how the "itchy's" are...even as smooth a wool as this is...apparently the process to "finish" the wool does take a bit of time, not sure of the details...<off on another retentive engineer research project now!>

          Jesse


          --- In LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com, Carol Lynn <gwynnyd@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > On Nov 2, 2010, at 12:45 AM, Cat Devereaux wrote:
          >
          > > Lord of the Rings Regular Authentic
          > > Grey Fellowship Cloak scarf
          >
          > I've had one of these for five or six years (since the traveling exhibit was in Indianapolis) and while I have been treating it carefully, I have been wearing it. I was always a trifle disappointed in how it looked compared to what the cloaks looked like in the movies. It always seemed a little too shiny and hard and flat but it was so very cool, that I wore it anyway. It finally got to the point where it had to be cleaned. I dithered, since last spring, on whether to have it dry cleaned or to try and wash it. I finally threw caution to the winds and washed it gently by hand in warm-ish water and tumble dried it on the no-heat setting. Well, lo and behold! It fulled itself just a trifle. It now has a much more three dimensional, lighter, look and texture and finally looks *exactly* like the material I saw on screen. I am happy.
          >
          > Wool is wonderful. Why didn't I do this five years ago?
          >
          > Gwynnyd
          >
          >
          >
          > Carol Lynn
          > carollynn@...
          >
          > "I would draw some of the great tales in fullness, and leave many only placed in the scheme, and sketched. The cycles should be linked to a majestic whole, and yet leave scope for other minds and hands, wielding paint and music and drama."
          >
          > JRR Tolkien, Letter #131
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Carol Lynn
          I was just over at TORN and they have a video taken at the Weta Cave gift shop that shows the cape as it is sold.
          Message 4 of 23 , Jan 4, 2011
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            I was just over at TORN and they have a video taken at the Weta Cave gift shop that shows the cape as it is sold.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVFGzsZtL-M&feature=player_embedded

            Look at around 2:14 -2:50. You can easily see the hard, shiny finish on the fabric that looks *nothing* like the fabric as shown in the movies. After I washed mine, it is MUCH better - more dimensional, more translucent, softer, and it hangs much better. If you have something in this fabric and want it to look like the "real" stuff as shown in the movies, bite the bullet and wash it.

            Gwynnyd


            On Dec 5, 2010, at 2:15 PM, Furqueron wrote:

            > Well met Carol Lynn,
            >
            > I was just exchanging emails with Kiri the other day on the wool order. She had asked if I wanted it "finished" or unfinished. Apparently they press or do something to it to give it a very smooth silken type finish. "Finished" is what they do to the scarves, but not the cloaks. (BTW, I admire you for wearing the scarf...mine is destined for a shadow box along with a brooch...but we'll definitely wear the cloaks we make!).
            >
            > I'm still debating on finished or unfinished...kids will be wearing the cloaks and we all know how the "itchy's" are...even as smooth a wool as this is...apparently the process to "finish" the wool does take a bit of time, not sure of the details...<off on another retentive engineer research project now!>
            >
            > Jesse
            >
            > --- In LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com, Carol Lynn <gwynnyd@...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > On Nov 2, 2010, at 12:45 AM, Cat Devereaux wrote:
            > >
            > > > Lord of the Rings Regular Authentic
            > > > Grey Fellowship Cloak scarf
            > >
            > > I've had one of these for five or six years (since the traveling exhibit was in Indianapolis) and while I have been treating it carefully, I have been wearing it. I was always a trifle disappointed in how it looked compared to what the cloaks looked like in the movies. It always seemed a little too shiny and hard and flat but it was so very cool, that I wore it anyway. It finally got to the point where it had to be cleaned. I dithered, since last spring, on whether to have it dry cleaned or to try and wash it. I finally threw caution to the winds and washed it gently by hand in warm-ish water and tumble dried it on the no-heat setting. Well, lo and behold! It fulled itself just a trifle. It now has a much more three dimensional, lighter, look and texture and finally looks *exactly* like the material I saw on screen. I am happy.
            > >
            > > Wool is wonderful. Why didn't I do this five years ago?
            > >
            > > Gwynnyd
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Carol Lynn
            > > carollynn@...
            > >
            > > "I would draw some of the great tales in fullness, and leave many only placed in the scheme, and sketched. The cycles should be linked to a majestic whole, and yet leave scope for other minds and hands, wielding paint and music and drama."
            > >
            > > JRR Tolkien, Letter #131
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Cat Devereaux
            ... There s a two step process... for the modern textiles the Stansborough folks use a fishing method... and when you special order the cloth, you get an
            Message 5 of 23 , Jan 4, 2011
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              On 1/4/2011 8:21 AM, Carol Lynn wrote:
              > shiny finish on the fabric that looks*nothing* like the fabric as shown in the movies. After I washed mine, it is MUCH better - more dimensional, more translucent, softer, and it hangs much better. If you have something in this fabric and want it to look like the "real" stuff as shown in the movies, bite the bullet and wash it.
              There's a two step process... for the modern textiles the Stansborough
              folks use a fishing method... and when you special order the cloth, you
              get an option to not have it finished.... which gives some of the
              effect. The rest.... as you've discovered is the light washing.

              (The light washing also undoes the finishing effect... though I don't
              know if it needs a bit more washing to undo the finish... or if one
              wetting is enough.)

              -Cat-


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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