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Fiber-etch

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  • dany_1954
    Hi all! You can say to me if this product can be used in order to create this? http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/9995/costume12wv2.png Thanks
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
      Hi all!
      You can say to me if this product can be used in order to create this?

      http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/9995/costume12wv2.png

      Thanks
    • Judy Mitchell
      ... yes, fiber-etch should work for top layer. be sure the velvet you use is part silk part rayon! the fiber etch works by dissolving the protein of the silk,
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
        dany_1954 wrote:
        > Hi all!
        > You can say to me if this product can be used in order to create this?
        >
        > http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/9995/costume12wv2.png
        >

        yes, fiber-etch should work for top layer. be sure the velvet you use
        is part silk part rayon! the fiber etch works by dissolving the protein
        of the silk, but not the rayon it is woven to (the 'ground').

        -Judy
      • Aurora Celeste
        ... Actually, that s backwards. The silk is the backing, and the rayon is the pile, that s why the percentage rayon is so high. You can actually tell the
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
          On 12/1/06, Judy Mitchell <judymitch@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dianna Filan wrote:
          >
          > I'm no where near being a fiber expert, but.. in the blends, it is
          > customary that the pile is silk and the ground is something else
          > (usually rayon - but not always!). Yes, it is expensive and difficult to
          > find 100% silk velvet - I have a link from a year ago when people on
          > h-costume were looking all over. Someone found it in Germany
          > <http://www.gewand-und-tand.de/samt.php> but it's 57euro a meter!
          >
          > The better the quality the higher the percentages. I would guess
          > that
          > your 12%silk/82% rayon probably also has the pile blended as well (which
          > means it wouldn't be good for etching).


          Actually, that's backwards. The silk is the backing, and the rayon is the
          pile, that's why the percentage rayon is so high. You can actually tell the
          length of the pile by the percentage, the higher the rayon percentage the
          longer the pile.

          You can tell which is which because silk is a protien fiber, like wool.
          Fiber etch dissolves cellulose fibers, like cotton, linen, and rayon (which
          is a synthetic cellulose, it's made by pulping up plants and creating fibers
          from the pulp). When you put fiber etch on the velvet it will dissolve the
          rayon pile and leave behind the silk backing. Fiber etch is a good test of
          what's what. Another one is bleach, bleach will dissolve proteins like
          silk, leaving behind the cellulose like rayon.

          Aurora


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • mellymel_hsv
          yes, fiber-etch should work for top layer. be sure the velvet you use is part silk part rayon! the fiber etch works by dissolving the protein of the silk, but
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
            yes, fiber-etch should work for top layer. be sure the velvet you use
            is part silk part rayon! the fiber etch works by dissolving the protein
            of the silk, but not the rayon it is woven to (the 'ground').

            -Judy


            Actually, that's backwards, Fiber-Etch (at least the stuff made by the SilkPaint Corporation that Dharma Trading sells) dissolves plant fibers (cotton, linen, rayon, ramie, hemp, etc.) and leaves protein fibers (silk, wool, etc.) alone.

            They do recommend, however, that when working with fabrics that contain silk to not leave on overnight and to use a lower heat when activating. A tumble dryer is recommended instead of an iron.

            -Mel


            ---------------------------------
            Want to start your own business? Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Judy Mitchell
            ... ok, well I sorta had the right idea. I knew it was important that the fiber etched one and not the other. I just thought fiber-etch ate protein. Yes, I m
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
              Aurora Celeste wrote:

              > Actually, that's backwards. The silk is the backing, and the rayon is the
              > pile,

              ok, well I sorta had the right idea. I knew it was important that the
              fiber etched one and not the other. I just thought fiber-etch ate
              protein. Yes, I'm familiar with the bleach test: Robin Netherton was
              showing it at a GFD fitting day.

              -Judy
              (who had admitted to not being anywhere near a fiber expert! <G>)
            • Sabine
              Hi Cyndi, ... No, actually rayon shimmers more. Silk velvet has a surprisingly rough touch to it and isn t as shimmery as rayon velvet. ... Which is wrong. For
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 2, 2006
                Hi Cyndi,

                --- In LOTR_Costume@yahoogroups.com, SweetNakita1@... wrote:
                > From what
                > I have heard the pile shimmers more than the Rayon blend does.

                No, actually rayon shimmers more.
                Silk velvet has a surprisingly rough touch to it and isn't as
                shimmery as rayon velvet.

                > It is hard to find it pre dyed. I could only buy it in white
                > and have it dyed, which was a trip.

                Which is wrong. For example, www.thaisilks.com carries a wide palette
                of silk velvet, even in iridescent colors (=backing and pile in
                different colors).

                > It is harder to sew than
                > regular silk velvet from what I understand.

                Yes, the softness of the rayon pile makes it *very* slippery.

                > Someone told me (they could be wrong, so dont hold me to this)
                > that the Silk velvet is less stretchy. The rayon makes it
                stretchier.

                Wrong. Just think about it for a minute:
                The *pile* is made of rayon. The *backing* (which holds it all
                together) is made of silk. So how could the rayon part of that fabric
                possibly make it stretchier?
                What makes the silk-/rayon velvet "stretchy" (it's actually not
                really 'stretchy', it's more that the fabric is 'giving' a bit) is
                the prewashing, which makes the silk backing shrink a bit, but just
                like hair, it can also be stretched a bit. That's where it comes
                from.

                Besides that, I would like to say that one *must* be extremely
                careful when using fiber etch. It's *terribly* easy to burn one's
                skin and eyes with it.
                Read these:
                http://www.naergilien.info/tutorials/burnoutvelvet.htm
                instructions very carefully. I've also posted some very nasty
                pictures of possible skin damage there. And, as I have also described
                in that tutorial, I've once also burned my eyes with the smoke of the
                fiber etch - so all I can say about it is this:
                You can achieve *amazing* results, but you *must* be extra careful.

                Best wishes,
                Naergi
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