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Ubuntu 12.10 Slooooow Acer Aspire Atom w/ 2GB

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  • jperelst
    I recently installed Ubuntu 12.10 on an Acer Aspire One netbook that is running an Atom Z520 chip (Ubuntu says it is 1.33GHz x 2). The machine has 2 GB memory
    Message 1 of 12 , May 24, 2014
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      I recently installed Ubuntu 12.10 on an Acer Aspire One netbook that is running an Atom Z520 chip (Ubuntu says it is 1.33GHz x 2).  The machine has 2 GB memory installed (verified by Ubuntu).  This install replaced Win XP that came on the machine - I reformatted the HD (155 GB) and completely eliminated Windows - in other words, it is a full install and not a dual boot situation (it doesn't ask me to select an operating system when it boots up, so I have to believe I got the single boot right).  Ubuntu agrees that it is a 155 GB drive and tells me that I have about 144 GB remaining.


      It is just unacceptably slow.  


      Much slower than Win XP on that machine.  For example, it takes about 20 seconds for Firefox to open in Ubuntu vs. about 10 seconds in XP on that machine.  Libre Office takes about 30 seconds to open versus about 10 seconds in XP on that machine.  There is a noticeable delay in typing on Libre Office under Ubuntu (characters appear on the screen 3-5 characters behind what I'm typing) versus sharp crisp response under XP.  It typically takes 10 seconds to open an individual email in GMail versus 2-3 seconds under XP.


      When windows/screens (whatever they're called in Ubuntu) open, they open small and transparent and then grow to full size and full opacity over a period of seconds in steps.  It is annoying, especially given the delay between clicking on something and that something being open and ready to accept input from the keyboard.  Even the command button (the little gear cog on the top right) is slow to respond.


      Yes, I did measure response times before I switched to Ubuntu because I was expecting improvements and wanted to see just what kind of improvement I was getting.  Instead, I'm ready to give up on Ubuntu and go back to Windows.


      I have no idea what Ubuntu does for drivers - does it just load some generic drivers for keyboards, display, etc. that could be slowing things down?  Was I supposed to find some Ubuntu drivers for this machine and load them?  I didn't specifically load any drivers - but everything was working (just slowly) once I finished the install.

      Is this just normal for Ubuntu on a machine like this (I can't believe that it's slower than XP) or can people start pointing me to ways to fix this problem.  And no, I'm not going to do my own recompiles of the Kernel or buy all sorts of extra special software - either Ubuntu makes sense on a machine like this, or it doesn't.  All the advertising/proselytizing says it does make sense, so is the advertising right or wrong?

      Thanks,
      Jon


    • Linux Canuck
      I am not sure why you installed 12.10. It has no support, so you cannot even get updates to fix any problems that you might have. Six month releases like 12.10
      Message 2 of 12 , May 27, 2014
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        I am not sure why you installed 12.10. It has no support, so you cannot even get updates to fix any problems that you might have. Six month releases like 12.10 only had 18 months, so support ran out over a year ago. Now six month releases only get nine months support. Your best bet is to install either 12.04 or 14.04 which have five years of support because they are LTS (long term support). Reports on 14.04 are good as far as speed improvements. BTW the number in front of the decimal is the year of release and the number after is the month. So 12.04 expires in 2017.

        It is unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu. XP is a ten year old operating system and Ubuntu is more current. It is like comparing XP with Vista or Windows 7 and and saying Vista is slower. Of course it is. There is more happening in a newer operating system and everything gets bigger including the applications. That is just to be expected in any operating system because they are pushing the limits and competing with newer versions of other OSes.

        For what it is worth, I do not find Unity (Ubuntu's desktop environment) particularly fast. There are faster options like XFCE and I find even KDE to be faster.

        Roy


        On Tuesday, May 27, 2014 8:24:10 AM, "jon.perelstein@... [LINUX_Newbies]" <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


         
        I recently installed Ubuntu 12.10 on an Acer Aspire One netbook that is running an Atom Z520 chip (Ubuntu says it is 1.33GHz x 2).  The machine has 2 GB memory installed (verified by Ubuntu).  This install replaced Win XP that came on the machine - I reformatted the HD (155 GB) and completely eliminated Windows - in other words, it is a full install and not a dual boot situation (it doesn't ask me to select an operating system when it boots up, so I have to believe I got the single boot right).  Ubuntu agrees that it is a 155 GB drive and tells me that I have about 144 GB remaining.

        It is just unacceptably slow.  

        Much slower than Win XP on that machine.  For example, it takes about 20 seconds for Firefox to open in Ubuntu vs. about 10 seconds in XP on that machine.  Libre Office takes about 30 seconds to open versus about 10 seconds in XP on that machine.  There is a noticeable delay in typing on Libre Office under Ubuntu (characters appear on the screen 3-5 characters behind what I'm typing) versus sharp crisp response under XP.  It typically takes 10 seconds to open an individual email in GMail versus 2-3 seconds under XP.

        When windows/screens (whatever they're called in Ubuntu) open, they open small and transparent and then grow to full size and full opacity over a period of seconds in steps.  It is annoying, especially given the delay between clicking on something and that something being open and ready to accept input from the keyboard.  Even the command button (the little gear cog on the top right) is slow to respond.

        Yes, I did measure response times before I switched to Ubuntu because I was expecting improvements and wanted to see just what kind of improvement I was getting.  Instead, I'm ready to give up on Ubuntu and go back to Windows.

        I have no idea what Ubuntu does for drivers - does it just load some generic drivers for keyboards, display, etc. that could be slowing things down?  Was I supposed to find some Ubuntu drivers for this machine and load them?  I didn't specifically load any drivers - but everything was working (just slowly) once I finished the install.

        Is this just normal for Ubuntu on a machine like this (I can't believe that it's slower than XP) or can people start pointing me to ways to fix this problem.  And no, I'm not going to do my own recompiles of the Kernel or buy all sorts of extra special software - either Ubuntu makes sense on a machine like this, or it doesn't.  All the advertising/proselytizing says it does make sense, so is the advertising right or wrong?

        Thanks,
        Jon



      • Scott
        ... Unfortunately, IMHO, Linux gets more Windows like with each iteration, including bloat and slowness. There are various distributions made for older
        Message 3 of 12 , May 27, 2014
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          On Tue, May 27, 2014 at 06:14:21AM -0700, Linux Canuck linuxcanuck@... [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:

          >
          > It is unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu. XP is a ten year old operating system and Ubuntu is more current.


          > For what it is worth, I do not find Unity (Ubuntu's desktop environment) particularly fast. There are faster options like XFCE and I find even KDE to be faster.


          Unfortunately, IMHO, Linux gets more Windows like with each iteration,
          including bloat and slowness. There are various distributions made for
          older machines. As Roy said, the XFCE edition might be better, or even
          lighter, the LXDE edition, Lubuntu.

          There are other distributions that are even better suited for older
          machines.

          --
          Scott Robbins
          PGP keyID EB3467D6
          ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
          gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
        • jperelst
          Thanks for your reply. Why 12.10? Because when I went to the Ubuntu site, there wasn t anything that gave me - a newcomer to Linux/Ubuntu - any idea of what I
          Message 4 of 12 , May 27, 2014
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            Thanks for your reply.

            Why 12.10?  Because when I went to the Ubuntu site, there wasn't anything that gave me - a newcomer to Linux/Ubuntu - any idea of what I should do/which version.   

            It's unpleasant to "hear" you say that it's unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu when so many articles and "experts" have been touting Ubuntu as the logical solution for people faced with having to migrate away from XP.

            You said that you don't find Unity to be particularly fast.  Is Unity the issue around the delay in opening Foxfire?  Is it the issue in the speed of Libre Office?

            Is there some other version of Linux I should be considering rather than Ubuntu?

            Jon


            ---In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, <linuxcanuck@...> wrote :

            I am not sure why you installed 12.10. It has no support, so you cannot even get updates to fix any problems that you might have. Six month releases like 12.10 only had 18 months, so support ran out over a year ago. Now six month releases only get nine months support. Your best bet is to install either 12.04 or 14.04 which have five years of support because they are LTS (long term support). Reports on 14.04 are good as far as speed improvements. BTW the number in front of the decimal is the year of release and the number after is the month. So 12.04 expires in 2017.

            It is unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu. XP is a ten year old operating system and Ubuntu is more current. It is like comparing XP with Vista or Windows 7 and and saying Vista is slower. Of course it is. There is more happening in a newer operating system and everything gets bigger including the applications. That is just to be expected in any operating system because they are pushing the limits and competing with newer versions of other OSes.

            For what it is worth, I do not find Unity (Ubuntu's desktop environment) particularly fast. There are faster options like XFCE and I find even KDE to be faster.

            Roy

          • Joan Leach
            On my netbook, I have various USB, both Live and installed flash drives, since the internal hard drive went bad. Those I have are Zorin 6 Light for LXDE, based
            Message 5 of 12 , May 27, 2014
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              On my netbook, I have various USB, both Live and installed flash drives, since the internal hard drive went bad. Those I have are Zorin 6 Light for LXDE, based off Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. I've also used Bodhi and WattOS 7.5, but if I want to use the internal wi-fi card, I use one of my Puppy Linux 1 GB flash drives, or I plug in an USB wi-fi card that's seen in Linux. I also tried a few others, which is nice, since it gives you a chance to see what you like and what might work best for your hardware.

              By the way, if you had tried installing Win7, other than Starter, you would it see pretty slow, too. Is the hard drive a SSD or 4200, 5400, or 7800 rps hard drive?

              Joan in Reno


              From: "jon.perelstein@... [LINUX_Newbies]" <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
              To: LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 10:11 AM
              Subject: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: Ubuntu 12.10 Slooooow Acer Aspire Atom w/ 2GB

               
              Thanks for your reply.

              Why 12.10?  Because when I went to the Ubuntu site, there wasn't anything that gave me - a newcomer to Linux/Ubuntu - any idea of what I should do/which version.   

              It's unpleasant to "hear" you say that it's unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu when so many articles and "experts" have been touting Ubuntu as the logical solution for people faced with having to migrate away from XP.

              You said that you don't find Unity to be particularly fast.  Is Unity the issue around the delay in opening Foxfire?  Is it the issue in the speed of Libre Office?

              Is there some other version of Linux I should be considering rather than Ubuntu?

              Jon


              ---In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, <linuxcanuck@...> wrote :

              I am not sure why you installed 12.10. It has no support, so you cannot even get updates to fix any problems that you might have. Six month releases like 12.10 only had 18 months, so support ran out over a year ago. Now six month releases only get nine months support. Your best bet is to install either 12.04 or 14.04 which have five years of support because they are LTS (long term support). Reports on 14.04 are good as far as speed improvements. BTW the number in front of the decimal is the year of release and the number after is the month. So 12.04 expires in 2017.

              It is unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu. XP is a ten year old operating system and Ubuntu is more current. It is like comparing XP with Vista or Windows 7 and and saying Vista is slower. Of course it is. There is more happening in a newer operating system and everything gets bigger including the applications. That is just to be expected in any operating system because they are pushing the limits and competing with newer versions of other OSes.

              For what it is worth, I do not find Unity (Ubuntu's desktop environment) particularly fast. There are faster options like XFCE and I find even KDE to be faster.

              Roy



            • Jon Wombat
              If you want fast, maybe check out Crunhbang (#!) . Very minimalist, a small learning curve, but I love it. On 27 May 2014 20:03, Joan Leach
              Message 6 of 12 , May 27, 2014
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                If you want fast,  maybe check out Crunhbang (#!) . Very minimalist,  a small learning curve,  but I love it. 

                On 27 May 2014 20:03, "Joan Leach jleach728@... [LINUX_Newbies]" <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                >

                >

              • Steve Farkas
                You are viewing linux as some company s product that is the one size fits all solution. It is an open source solution that users tailor to their own needs.
                Message 7 of 12 , May 27, 2014
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                  You are viewing linux as some company's product that is the one size fits all solution. It is an open source solution that users tailor to their own needs. Think of how much you paid for it. Not sure what you wanted for free. Linux is suggested as the solution to replace a dead operating system. Which is what you are running on old outdated hardware. 

                  Sent from my iPad

                  On May 27, 2014, at 1:11 PM, "jon.perelstein@... [LINUX_Newbies]" <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                   

                  Thanks for your reply.


                  Why 12.10?  Because when I went to the Ubuntu site, there wasn't anything that gave me - a newcomer to Linux/Ubuntu - any idea of what I should do/which version.   

                  It's unpleasant to "hear" you say that it's unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu when so many articles and "experts" have been touting Ubuntu as the logical solution for people faced with having to migrate away from XP.

                  You said that you don't find Unity to be particularly fast.  Is Unity the issue around the delay in opening Foxfire?  Is it the issue in the speed of Libre Office?

                  Is there some other version of Linux I should be considering rather than Ubuntu?

                  Jon


                  ---In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, <linuxcanuck@...> wrote :

                  I am not sure why you installed 12.10. It has no support, so you cannot even get updates to fix any problems that you might have. Six month releases like 12.10 only had 18 months, so support ran out over a year ago. Now six month releases only get nine months support. Your best bet is to install either 12.04 or 14.04 which have five years of support because they are LTS (long term support). Reports on 14.04 are good as far as speed improvements. BTW the number in front of the decimal is the year of release and the number after is the month. So 12.04 expires in 2017.

                  It is unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu. XP is a ten year old operating system and Ubuntu is more current. It is like comparing XP with Vista or Windows 7 and and saying Vista is slower. Of course it is. There is more happening in a newer operating system and everything gets bigger including the applications. That is just to be expected in any operating system because they are pushing the limits and competing with newer versions of other OSes.

                  For what it is worth, I do not find Unity (Ubuntu's desktop environment) particularly fast. There are faster options like XFCE and I find even KDE to be faster.

                  Roy

                • Loyal Barber
                  ... I would be willing to bet it is the video driver. Someone who uses Ubuntu, where does one find the restricted drivers in other words, drivers created by
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 27, 2014
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                    On 05/24/2014 03:57 PM, jon.perelstein@... [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
                     

                    I recently installed Ubuntu 12.10 on an Acer Aspire One netbook that is running an Atom Z520 chip (Ubuntu says it is 1.33GHz x 2).  The machine has 2 GB memory installed (verified by Ubuntu).  This install replaced Win XP that came on the machine - I reformatted the HD (155 GB) and completely eliminated Windows - in other words, it is a full install and not a dual boot situation (it doesn't ask me to select an operating system when it boots up, so I have to believe I got the single boot right).  Ubuntu agrees that it is a 155 GB drive and tells me that I have about 144 GB remaining.


                    It is just unacceptably slow.  




                    I would be willing to bet it is the video driver.  Someone who uses Ubuntu, where does one find the "restricted" drivers in other words, drivers created by video chip manufacturer.

                    Loyal
                  • mike bader
                    try xubuntu or lubuntu.
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 27, 2014
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                      try xubuntu or lubuntu.


                      On 5/27/2014 1:11 PM, jon.perelstein@... [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
                      Thanks for your reply.

                      Why 12.10?  Because when I went to the Ubuntu site, there wasn't anything that gave me - a newcomer to Linux/Ubuntu - any idea of what I should do/which version.   

                      It's unpleasant to "hear" you say that it's unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu when so many articles and "experts" have been touting Ubuntu as the logical solution for people faced with having to migrate away from XP.

                      You said that you don't find Unity to be particularly fast.  Is Unity the issue around the delay in opening Foxfire?  Is it the issue in the speed of Libre Office?

                      Is there some other version of Linux I should be considering rather than Ubuntu?

                      Jon


                      ---In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, <linuxcanuck@...> wrote :

                      I am not sure why you installed 12.10. It has no support, so you cannot even get updates to fix any problems that you might have. Six month releases like 12.10 only had 18 months, so support ran out over a year ago. Now six month releases only get nine months support. Your best bet is to install either 12.04 or 14.04 which have five years of support because they are LTS (long term support). Reports on 14.04 are good as far as speed improvements. BTW the number in front of the decimal is the year of release and the number after is the month. So 12.04 expires in 2017.

                      It is unfair to make comparisons between XP and Ubuntu. XP is a ten year old operating system and Ubuntu is more current. It is like comparing XP with Vista or Windows 7 and and saying Vista is slower. Of course it is. There is more happening in a newer operating system and everything gets bigger including the applications. That is just to be expected in any operating system because they are pushing the limits and competing with newer versions of other OSes.

                      For what it is worth, I do not find Unity (Ubuntu's desktop environment) particularly fast. There are faster options like XFCE and I find even KDE to be faster.

                      Roy


                    • Scott
                      ... If I remember correctly, the Aspire one has an onboard Intel. -- Scott Robbins PGP keyID EB3467D6 ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 ) gpg
                      Message 10 of 12 , May 28, 2014
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                        On Tue, May 27, 2014 at 09:21:17PM -0500, Loyal Barber loyal_barber@... [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
                        >
                        > On 05/24/2014 03:57 PM, jon.perelstein@... [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
                        > >
                        > >I recently installed Ubuntu 12.10 on an Acer Aspire One netbook
                        > >that is running an Atom Z520 chip (Ubuntu says it is 1.33GHz x 2).
                        > >The machine has 2 GB memory installed (verified by Ubuntu). This
                        > >install replaced Win XP that came on the machine - I reformatted
                        > >the HD (155 GB) and completely eliminated Windows - in other
                        > >words, it is a full install and not a dual boot situation (it
                        > >doesn't ask me to select an operating system when it boots up, so
                        > >I have to believe I got the single boot right). Ubuntu agrees
                        > >that it is a 155 GB drive and tells me that I have about 144 GB
                        > >remaining.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >It is just unacceptably slow.
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        > I would be willing to bet it is the video driver. Someone who uses
                        > Ubuntu, where does one find the "restricted" drivers in other words,
                        > drivers created by video chip manufacturer.

                        If I remember correctly, the Aspire one has an onboard Intel.

                        --
                        Scott Robbins
                        PGP keyID EB3467D6
                        ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
                        gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
                      • Linux Canuck
                        Linux IS a good replacement for Windows XP. There are over 1000 distributions and all are different. That is the quandary facing many users moving to Linux and
                        Message 11 of 12 , May 29, 2014
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                          Linux IS a good replacement for Windows XP. There are over 1000 distributions and all are different. That is the quandary facing many users moving to Linux and it has frightened off a fair number who are not used to choice. It is like going into a huge candy store in a foreign country when you have a sweet tooth. You don't know what to get.

                          Ubuntu is the biggest and most popular by far, but it is not necessarily the best for everyone. It uses its own desktop manager (Unity) and it tries to be the most which means unfortunately the specs required to run it have gone up over the years. However, remember that there are no guarantees that your older hardware will work with Windows' new variants either. They too have upped the ante in order to compete.

                          Linux really is just the kernel. On top of that is userland from GNU which is mostly the same in various distributions. But what you see and use varies greatly. There is a graphical user interface that makes a big difference. Part of that is the window manager and part of it is the desktop environment. 

                          Some distributions will completely from RAM with as little as 10 MBs with a GUI. From there the sky is the limit. Take the specs from any distribution and multiply that by at least a half in order to get something that you may be happy with in terms of performance.

                          Lowest RAM for a desktop environment also means less flexibility and convenience for the user. Openbox is one of the lowest but works best if it comes pre-configured by the developer. LXDE is one of the lowest that is user friendly. XFCE is one of the lowest that is user friendly and fun to use. Then take your choice. Unity, GNOME Shell, Cinnamon, Mate and KDE. All take similar resources but they are vastly different in how they use them and how they look and feel.

                          You can use Ubuntu for the base of any desktop environment. Some come pre-configured. Lubuntu is Ubuntu with LXDE. Xubuntu is Ubuntu with XFCE. Kubuntu is Ubuntu with KDE. Ubuntu GNOME is Ubuntu with GNOME Shell. Linux Mint will give you an Ubuntu base with Cinnamon or Mate. Or you can install ubuntu and add other desktop environments post-installation and test the performance difference on each. You can switch at login time.

                          The problem is not with Linux. It offers the user choice. It is small enough to run a watch and powerful enough to run the world's fastest supercomputer. The problem is that users coming from Windows are not used to choice. 

                          Microsoft in its attempt to become mainstream offered the user one look and feel for every situation. That is a fine strategy (also employed by Apple), but it does not give the user many options. Now Microsoft has followed Ubuntu's strategy with Windows 8 and tried to offer a common interface for all devices and users are rebelling. Ubuntu wants to put Ubuntu on TVs, phones, tablets etc. with the Unity interface on each and all apps the same on all devices. The name Unity was coined with this in mind and it pre-dates Windows 8.

                          Slaves who were freed must have felt like Windows XP users cut adrift by Microsoft. Where to go and what to do? That is the question and the answer is different for each person.

                          Roy





                          On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 4:47:31 PM, "Scott scottro@... [LINUX_Newbies]" <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                           
                          On Tue, May 27, 2014 at 09:21:17PM -0500, Loyal Barber loyal_barber@... [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
                          >
                          > On 05/24/2014 03:57 PM, jon.perelstein@... [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
                          > >
                          > >I recently installed Ubuntu 12.10 on an Acer Aspire One netbook
                          > >that is running an Atom Z520 chip (Ubuntu says it is 1.33GHz x 2).
                          > >The machine has 2 GB memory installed (verified by Ubuntu). This
                          > >install replaced Win XP that came on the machine - I reformatted
                          > >the HD (155 GB) and completely eliminated Windows - in other
                          > >words, it is a full install and not a dual boot situation (it
                          > >doesn't ask me to select an operating system when it boots up, so
                          > >I have to believe I got the single boot right). Ubuntu agrees
                          > >that it is a 155 GB drive and tells me that I have about 144 GB
                          > >remaining.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >It is just unacceptably slow.
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          > I would be willing to bet it is the video driver. Someone who uses
                          > Ubuntu, where does one find the "restricted" drivers in other words,
                          > drivers created by video chip manufacturer.

                          If I remember correctly, the Aspire one has an onboard Intel.

                          --
                          Scott Robbins
                          PGP keyID EB3467D6
                          ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
                          gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6



                        • Gene C. Falck
                          Hi Roy, ... No kidding! That s one of my considerations that got me into trying Linux! My old netbook that was on Windows XP fails the Windows 8 online test, I
                          Message 12 of 12 , May 29, 2014
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                            Hi Roy,

                            You wrote:

                            Ubuntu is the biggest and most popular by far, but it is not necessarily the best for everyone. It uses its own desktop manager (Unity) and it tries to be the most which means unfortunately the specs required to run it have gone up over the years. However, remember that there are no guarantees that your older hardware will work with Windows' new variants either. They too have upped the ante in order to compete.

                            No kidding! That's one of my considerations that
                            got me into trying Linux! My old netbook that was
                            on Windows XP fails the Windows 8 online test, I
                            don't know of anyone that liked Vista, and we're
                            going to Windows 7 where I work (so far, one it's
                            bad enough to keep me peeved at Microsoft).

                            ... choice. Unity, GNOME Shell, Cinnamon, Mate and KDE. All take similar resources but they are vastly different in how they use them and how they look and feel.

                            When I started on this path, I had been told Mint
                            with the Mate interface was a good bet. So far, so
                            good; it isn't very fast but not worse than XP (and,
                            of course, I lot better than a windows version that
                            won't work).

                            Since this is all an experiment, I'm doing OK. One
                            feature that has been an eye-opener is that MInt
                            with Mate posts a popup notice whenever a WiFi
                            drops me--I'm seeing how poor some are and, of
                            course, why I had such a bad time just trying to
                            download the .iso.

                            --

                            Regards,

                            Gene Falck
                            gfalck@...

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