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Re: USB Ethernet Adapter

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  • pmooney22
    Hi Donald, Your initial thread seems to have got hijacked. What problems are you having installing the driver (e.g. do you get error messages when you type
    Message 1 of 24 , Mar 28, 2013
      Hi Donald,

      Your initial thread seems to have got hijacked.

      What problems are you having installing the driver (e.g. do you get error messages when you type 'make'?).

      What amateur radio programs in particular are you looking at? Just about all linux applications will run on other distributions but may take a bit of work to do so (e.g. using alien to convert from one package manager to another, e.g. .deb to .rpm) so you aren't stuck with one distribution. Look around, find one you like and then develop skills - they can readily be transferred to other distros.

      P.


      --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Donald" <tambeaud@...> wrote:
      >
      > Yes when I plug the adapter in nothing is seen on desktop. I have not tried another Linux Live because Centos is what I need for Amateur Radio applications. A driver disk came with the adapter. Two files are on the disk. "Linux_7830.tar" and "MCS7830_FreeBSC.tar" I am trying to read on how to install the driver from these files but it is pretty complicated!
      > Thank you
      > Don
      >
    • Paul
      ... Thanks. Whenever I see what looks like someone telling someone else not to do something in Linux that is an accepted procedure I try to counter that. As
      Message 2 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
        --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, <petem001@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am with you Paul.
        >
        > I started up with debian 1.1 (Buzz) and I was doing the network install over a windows internet share on a 28.8k modem..
        >
        > I had to wait hours for “package” to download.. And I was compiling my kernels.. I dont do that anymore as most of the time the kernels that come with the disto I use alway’s fit.
        >
        > But It is a good Idea to know how a kernel is built, and sometimes when I feel like optimizing my machine I do a kernel compile.. And its fun!
        >

        Thanks. Whenever I see what looks like someone telling someone else not to do something in Linux that is an accepted procedure I try to counter that. As far as I'm concerned, "replace any kernel with a 'vanilla' kernel from www.kernel.org BUT as the name of this group is Linux newbies I won't recommend doing this on a computer that you'll need to use" is about the biggest piece of bad advise I can think of.

        The name of the group is Linux Newbies but it isn't Perpetual Linux Newbies. Everyone has to take the training wheels off eventually and learn how to balance on their own.

        Building a Linux kernel is one of the traditional rites of passage in Linux too. A task that I believe is an integral part of the enrichment process. So in the spirit of having said all of that would everyone please join me in a chant, make, make, make, MAKE!
      • Pierre Martel
        One thing to remember is to use stable kernel. The release number is simple. A kernel 2.6 is stable, a kernel 2.7 is unstable or developement . Unless you fell
        Message 3 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
          One thing to remember is to use stable kernel. The release number is
          simple. A kernel 2.6 is stable, a kernel 2.7 is unstable or developement .
          Unless you fell adventurous ;-) . Any release that end with a odd numer is
          unstable.

          And you can make any number of kernel you want, you will be able to fall
          back to your working kernel as you wish if you work properly with your boot
          loader.


          Le lundi 1 avril 2013, Paul a �crit :

          > **
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com <javascript:_e({}, 'cvml',
          > 'LINUX_Newbies%40yahoogroups.com');>, <petem001@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I am with you Paul.
          > >
          > > I started up with debian 1.1 (Buzz) and I was doing the network install
          > over a windows internet share on a 28.8k modem..
          > >
          > > I had to wait hours for ���package�� to download.. And I was compiling
          > my kernels.. I dont do that anymore as most of the time the kernels that
          > come with the disto I use alway���s fit.
          > >
          > > But It is a good Idea to know how a kernel is built, and sometimes when
          > I feel like optimizing my machine I do a kernel compile.. And its fun!
          > >
          >
          > Thanks. Whenever I see what looks like someone telling someone else not to
          > do something in Linux that is an accepted procedure I try to counter that.
          > As far as I'm concerned, "replace any kernel with a 'vanilla' kernel from
          > www.kernel.org BUT as the name of this group is Linux newbies I won't
          > recommend doing this on a computer that you'll need to use" is about the
          > biggest piece of bad advise I can think of.
          >
          > The name of the group is Linux Newbies but it isn't Perpetual Linux
          > Newbies. Everyone has to take the training wheels off eventually and learn
          > how to balance on their own.
          >
          > Building a Linux kernel is one of the traditional rites of passage in
          > Linux too. A task that I believe is an integral part of the enrichment
          > process. So in the spirit of having said all of that would everyone please
          > join me in a chant, make, make, make, MAKE!
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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