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Re: USB Ethernet Adapter

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  • Paul
    ... It is hard to install a newer kernel into CentOS? I do that with every other Linux distribution I use. I m only asking because I ve never run CentOS and
    Message 1 of 24 , Mar 26, 2013
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      --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Scott <scottro@...> wrote:
      >
      > On Tue, Mar 26, 2013 at 02:34:32PM -0700, Joan Leach wrote:
      > > http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/install-tarballs/
      > > I found this with this Google search string:Linux 7830.tar Centos/Redhat how to run
      >
      > Note that CentOS is relatively old in terms of packages and kernel drivers.
      > It might be worth trying it with something else, even a live CD.


      It is hard to install a newer kernel into CentOS? I do that with every other Linux distribution I use. I'm only asking because I've never run CentOS and I'm wondering what makes it so different.
    • Scott
      ... There are the elrepo foks, who make a 3.x kernel for it. The thing is that CentOS does its best to be binary compatible with RH and when you change
      Message 2 of 24 , Mar 27, 2013
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        On Tue, Mar 26, 2013 at 10:23:52PM -0000, Paul wrote:
        >
        >
        > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Scott <scottro@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > On Tue, Mar 26, 2013 at 02:34:32PM -0700, Joan Leach wrote:
        > > > http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/install-tarballs/
        > > > I found this with this Google search string:Linux 7830.tar Centos/Redhat how to run
        > >
        > > Note that CentOS is relatively old in terms of packages and kernel drivers.
        > > It might be worth trying it with something else, even a live CD.
        >
        >
        > It is hard to install a newer kernel into CentOS? I do that with every other Linux distribution I use. I'm only asking because I've never run CentOS and I'm wondering what makes it so different.

        There are the elrepo foks, who make a 3.x kernel for it. The thing is that
        CentOS does its best to be binary compatible with RH and when you change
        things, you risk breakage. The folks maintaining elrepo are responsible
        types but have limited testing available.

        Generally one uses CentOS in the same places you would use Debian stable,
        mission critical type servers. Though the way Linux is going, many folks
        just use it because they dislike some of the changes that have been made.


        --
        Scott Robbins
        PGP keyID EB3467D6
        ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
        gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

        Buffy: I told one lie... I had one drink...
        Giles: Yes. And you were very nearly devoured by a giant demon
        snake. The words, 'Let that be a lesson' are a tad redundant at
        this juncture.
      • pmooney22
        I ve downloaded the driver file you mention, & the INSTALL file reads: 1. make to compile the source. 2. ./mosinst to install the driver 3. ifconfig usbx
        Message 3 of 24 , Mar 27, 2013
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          I've downloaded the driver file you mention, & the INSTALL file reads:

          1. "make " to compile the source.
          2. ./mosinst to install the driver
          3. ifconfig usbx xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx to configure the device

          What difficulties are you having installing? How far into the installation are the errors (e.g. at 'make, or at './mosinst')?

          Kernels are usually compiled by the distributers for their distribution. Centos appear to be one of the most 'staid' in that their distro is based upon commercial RedHat (as is Fedora) but with all hint (taint?) of proprietary ownership removed. You can replace any kernel with a 'vanilla' kernel from www.kernel.org BUT as the name of this group is Linux newbies I won't recommend doing this on a computer that you'll need to use  without a new installation.

          If you REALLY want to mess about with the kernel take a look at http://kernelnewbies.org/KernelBuild but, as they say, make sure you have got everything well backed up first.





          -----Original Message-----
          From: Paul <pfrederick1@...>
          To: LINUX_Newbies <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tue, Mar 26, 2013 10:23 pm
          Subject: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: USB Ethernet Adapter

           

          --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Scott <scottro@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Tue, Mar 26, 2013 at 02:34:32PM -0700, Joan Leach wrote:
          > > http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/install-tarballs/
          > > I found this with this Google search string:Linux 7830.tar Centos/Redhat how to run
          >
          > Note that CentOS is relatively old in terms of packages and kernel drivers.
          > It might be worth trying it with something else, even a live CD.

          It is hard to install a newer kernel into CentOS? I do that with every other Linux distribution I use. I'm only asking because I've never run CentOS and I'm wondering what makes it so different.









          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Hal
          ... Have you tried modprobe usbnet ? That seems to be the name of a driver for some distributions.. -- Hal UNIX-GNU/Linux; Slackware 13.1 kernel
          Message 4 of 24 , Mar 27, 2013
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            On Tue, Mar 26, 2013 at 03:54:19PM -0400, Hal wrote:
            > On Tue, Mar 26, 2013 at 07:40:11PM -0000, Paul wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Donald" <tambeaud@...> wrote:
            > > > I need help in installing the adapter.
            > > > Thank you
            > > > Donald Tambeau
            > > > VE3HOL
            >
            > It looks like the kernel see's the adapter but is not autoloading the
            > kernel driver..
            >
            > Maybe you could search for USB Ethernet Driver or something like that??

            Have you tried 'modprobe usbnet'? That seems to be the name of a driver
            for some distributions..

            --
            Hal UNIX-GNU/Linux; Slackware 13.1 kernel 2.6.33.4
          • Paul
            ... You cannot recover from a miffed kernel configuration? Is it really that hard to keep a kernel that boots on a system while a new one is being configured
            Message 5 of 24 , Mar 27, 2013
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              --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, kwacka2@... wrote:
              >
              > I've downloaded the driver file you mention, & the INSTALL file reads:
              >
              > 1. "make " to compile the source.
              > 2. ./mosinst to install the driver
              > 3. ifconfig usbx xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx to configure the device
              >
              > What difficulties are you having installing? How far into the installation are the errors (e.g. at 'make, or at './mosinst')?
              >
              > Kernels are usually compiled by the distributers for their distribution. Centos appear to be one of the most 'staid' in that their distro is based upon commercial RedHat (as is Fedora) but with all hint (taint?) of proprietary ownership removed. You can replace any kernel with a 'vanilla' kernel from www.kernel.org BUT as the name of this group is Linux newbies I won't recommend doing this on a computer that you'll need to use  without a new installation.
              >
              > If you REALLY want to mess about with the kernel take a look at http://kernelnewbies.org/KernelBuild but, as they say, make sure you have got everything well backed up first.
              >

              You cannot recover from a miffed kernel configuration? Is it really that hard to keep a kernel that boots on a system while a new one is being configured and tested? Because if you do that then you always have the backup kernel to run. You'd be in no worse shape than when you started. Believe it or not some pretty clever people came up with this whole system, so that even idiots can manage to work with it.

              I'm no rocket scientist but I can handle it. I'm fairly confident that anyone who can manage to participate in this group has the capability of building their own custom configured Linux kernel and successfully running it too. They may not get it 100% right the first time they try but if they just keep at it I'm certain they can manage it eventually.

              As long as you keep your old kernel around you get as many tries as you need too.

              That is the "secret" folks. Just don't overwrite your kernel that already boots up. Then you'll never be any worse off than you already are. If you're running a kernel you got with your distribution you're pretty bad off too! You can do a better job for yourself. That is what Linux is all about too, doing a better job for yourself.

              Whatever you get from a distribution is only a nice start. Canned kernels aren't even that. I've seen a lot of them and they all suck. There is absolutely no way a kernel that comes with a distribution can be any good. Not when it has to boot on such a wide variety of hardware.

              Learning how to configure, build, and install a Linux kernel is a basic essential skill that everyone who runs Linux should master for themselves. Either that or you have to reevaluate why you run Linux in the first place. Because the kernel *is* Linux! I mean if you're not going to build your own kernel then you might as well just run to an Apple store. They build their kernels specifically for their hardware. You will pay a premium for that with them though.

              Use The Source Luke don't succumb to the darkside ...
            • pmooney22
              The O/P requested advice on how to get a particular device working and, with respect to the O/P the comment that they were having difficuly in installing a
              Message 6 of 24 , Mar 28, 2013
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                The O/P requested advice on how to get a particular device working and, with respect to the O/P the comment that they were having difficuly in installing a driver suggested to me that they were new to GNU/Linux.

                The O/P did NOT ask (until another poster mentioned this) about configuring the kernel, and posts then moved to whether the driver in question would be in a newer kernel (the file linked is 5 years old, the original driver was a decade ago so a newer kernel is largely irrelevent)

                I agree with much of what you say; it would be ideal if everybody utilised LFS and built their own drivers; but I'd suggest that comes after topics such as kernel configuration which, in turn, came after software compilation and driver installation, which might (in turn) would follow advice on installing a popular distribution (Mint, Ubuntu et al). I don't expect anybody to advise a user to start off on Gentoo, or even Arch Linux.

                It may well be that the O/P has no interest in developing skills beyond those of a user, rather than an expert on GNU/Linux, and merely wants to use a particular device that they possess. That is their prerogative.

                I agree there is nothing magic about compiling a kernel. However I would suggest that there are many linux users that have never compiled a kernel, in the same way there are possibly millions that have never used the 'power'-shell when running Windows, and new users should be encouraged rather than it be suggested that you 'have to' compile a kernel as a first step.

                Regards

                P.




                --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Paul" <pfrederick1@...> wrote:

                > You cannot recover from a miffed kernel configuration? Is it really that hard to keep a kernel that boots on a system while a new one is being configured and tested? Because if you do that then you always have the backup kernel to run. You'd be in no worse shape than when you started. Believe it or not some pretty clever people came up with this whole system, so that even idiots can manage to work with it.
                >
              • Paul
                ... That is nice but I was not replying to the original poster I was replying to you. ... I started off with Slackware in the 90s and I survived. ... Then it
                Message 7 of 24 , Mar 28, 2013
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                  --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "pmooney22" <kwacka2@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The O/P requested advice on how to get a particular device working and, with respect to the O/P the comment that they were having difficuly in installing a driver suggested to me that they were new to GNU/Linux.
                  >
                  > The O/P did NOT ask (until another poster mentioned this) about configuring the kernel, and posts then moved to whether the driver in question would be in a newer kernel (the file linked is 5 years old, the original driver was a decade ago so a newer kernel is largely irrelevent)

                  That is nice but I was not replying to the original poster I was replying to you.

                  >
                  > I agree with much of what you say; it would be ideal if everybody utilised LFS and built their own drivers; but I'd suggest that comes after topics such as kernel configuration which, in turn, came after software compilation and driver installation, which might (in turn) would follow advice on installing a popular distribution (Mint, Ubuntu et al). I don't expect anybody to advise a user to start off on Gentoo, or even Arch Linux.

                  I started off with Slackware in the 90s and I survived.

                  >
                  > It may well be that the O/P has no interest in developing skills beyond those of a user, rather than an expert on GNU/Linux, and merely wants to use a particular device that they possess. That is their prerogative.

                  Then it is my prerogative to tell users like that I feel they are wasting their time.
                  >
                  > I agree there is nothing magic about compiling a kernel. However I would suggest that there are many linux users that have never compiled a kernel, in the same way there are possibly millions that have never used the 'power'-shell when running Windows, and new users should be encouraged rather than it be suggested that you 'have to' compile a kernel as a first step.

                  Why? We are talking about Linux aren't we? Either use it, or don't.

                  >
                  > Regards
                • ve2pf
                  I am with you Paul. I started up with debian 1.1 (Buzz) and I was doing the network install over a windows internet share on a 28.8k modem.. I had to wait
                  Message 8 of 24 , Mar 28, 2013
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                    I am with you Paul.

                    I started up with debian 1.1 (Buzz) and I was doing the network install over a windows internet share on a 28.8k modem..

                    I had to wait hours for “package” to download.. And I was compiling my kernels.. I dont do that anymore as most of the time the kernels that come with the disto I use alway’s fit.

                    But It is a good Idea to know how a kernel is built, and sometimes when I feel like optimizing my machine I do a kernel compile.. And its fun!



                    From: Paul
                    Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2013 4:56 PM
                    To: LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: USB Ethernet Adapter (OT) build your own kernel




                    --- In mailto:LINUX_Newbies%40yahoogroups.com, "pmooney22" <kwacka2@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The O/P requested advice on how to get a particular device working and, with respect to the O/P the comment that they were having difficuly in installing a driver suggested to me that they were new to GNU/Linux.
                    >
                    > The O/P did NOT ask (until another poster mentioned this) about configuring the kernel, and posts then moved to whether the driver in question would be in a newer kernel (the file linked is 5 years old, the original driver was a decade ago so a newer kernel is largely irrelevent)

                    That is nice but I was not replying to the original poster I was replying to you.

                    >
                    > I agree with much of what you say; it would be ideal if everybody utilised LFS and built their own drivers; but I'd suggest that comes after topics such as kernel configuration which, in turn, came after software compilation and driver installation, which might (in turn) would follow advice on installing a popular distribution (Mint, Ubuntu et al). I don't expect anybody to advise a user to start off on Gentoo, or even Arch Linux.

                    I started off with Slackware in the 90s and I survived.

                    >
                    > It may well be that the O/P has no interest in developing skills beyond those of a user, rather than an expert on GNU/Linux, and merely wants to use a particular device that they possess. That is their prerogative.

                    Then it is my prerogative to tell users like that I feel they are wasting their time.
                    >
                    > I agree there is nothing magic about compiling a kernel. However I would suggest that there are many linux users that have never compiled a kernel, in the same way there are possibly millions that have never used the 'power'-shell when running Windows, and new users should be encouraged rather than it be suggested that you 'have to' compile a kernel as a first step.

                    Why? We are talking about Linux aren't we? Either use it, or don't.

                    >
                    > Regards





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • pmooney22
                    Ok so you started using Linux in the 1990s, as did I (before Bob got his pipe). Please allow me to place my lips against your buttocks. Meanwhile, the question
                    Message 9 of 24 , Mar 28, 2013
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                      Ok so you started using Linux in the 1990s, as did I (before Bob got his pipe).

                      Please allow me to place my lips against your buttocks.

                      Meanwhile, the question I asked the O/P was, what problems are you having installing the driver? For example, when you type 'make' do you get error messages?
                    • Pierre Martel
                      Hey! At least I started on a kernel 2 ! :-) ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Message 10 of 24 , Mar 28, 2013
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                        Hey! At least I started on a kernel 2 ! :-)
                        Le 2013-03-28 18:26, "pmooney22" <kwacka2@...> a �crit :

                        > **
                        >
                        >
                        > Ok so you started using Linux in the 1990s, as did I (before Bob got his
                        > pipe).
                        >
                        > Please allow me to place my lips against your buttocks.
                        >
                        > Meanwhile, the question I asked the O/P was, what problems are you having
                        > installing the driver? For example, when you type 'make' do you get error
                        > messages?
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • pmooney22
                        Hi Donald, Your initial thread seems to have got hijacked. What problems are you having installing the driver (e.g. do you get error messages when you type
                        Message 11 of 24 , Mar 28, 2013
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                          Hi Donald,

                          Your initial thread seems to have got hijacked.

                          What problems are you having installing the driver (e.g. do you get error messages when you type 'make'?).

                          What amateur radio programs in particular are you looking at? Just about all linux applications will run on other distributions but may take a bit of work to do so (e.g. using alien to convert from one package manager to another, e.g. .deb to .rpm) so you aren't stuck with one distribution. Look around, find one you like and then develop skills - they can readily be transferred to other distros.

                          P.


                          --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Donald" <tambeaud@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Yes when I plug the adapter in nothing is seen on desktop. I have not tried another Linux Live because Centos is what I need for Amateur Radio applications. A driver disk came with the adapter. Two files are on the disk. "Linux_7830.tar" and "MCS7830_FreeBSC.tar" I am trying to read on how to install the driver from these files but it is pretty complicated!
                          > Thank you
                          > Don
                          >
                        • Paul
                          ... Thanks. Whenever I see what looks like someone telling someone else not to do something in Linux that is an accepted procedure I try to counter that. As
                          Message 12 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
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                            --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, <petem001@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I am with you Paul.
                            >
                            > I started up with debian 1.1 (Buzz) and I was doing the network install over a windows internet share on a 28.8k modem..
                            >
                            > I had to wait hours for “package” to download.. And I was compiling my kernels.. I dont do that anymore as most of the time the kernels that come with the disto I use alway’s fit.
                            >
                            > But It is a good Idea to know how a kernel is built, and sometimes when I feel like optimizing my machine I do a kernel compile.. And its fun!
                            >

                            Thanks. Whenever I see what looks like someone telling someone else not to do something in Linux that is an accepted procedure I try to counter that. As far as I'm concerned, "replace any kernel with a 'vanilla' kernel from www.kernel.org BUT as the name of this group is Linux newbies I won't recommend doing this on a computer that you'll need to use" is about the biggest piece of bad advise I can think of.

                            The name of the group is Linux Newbies but it isn't Perpetual Linux Newbies. Everyone has to take the training wheels off eventually and learn how to balance on their own.

                            Building a Linux kernel is one of the traditional rites of passage in Linux too. A task that I believe is an integral part of the enrichment process. So in the spirit of having said all of that would everyone please join me in a chant, make, make, make, MAKE!
                          • Pierre Martel
                            One thing to remember is to use stable kernel. The release number is simple. A kernel 2.6 is stable, a kernel 2.7 is unstable or developement . Unless you fell
                            Message 13 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
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                              One thing to remember is to use stable kernel. The release number is
                              simple. A kernel 2.6 is stable, a kernel 2.7 is unstable or developement .
                              Unless you fell adventurous ;-) . Any release that end with a odd numer is
                              unstable.

                              And you can make any number of kernel you want, you will be able to fall
                              back to your working kernel as you wish if you work properly with your boot
                              loader.


                              Le lundi 1 avril 2013, Paul a �crit :

                              > **
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com <javascript:_e({}, 'cvml',
                              > 'LINUX_Newbies%40yahoogroups.com');>, <petem001@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > I am with you Paul.
                              > >
                              > > I started up with debian 1.1 (Buzz) and I was doing the network install
                              > over a windows internet share on a 28.8k modem..
                              > >
                              > > I had to wait hours for ���package�� to download.. And I was compiling
                              > my kernels.. I dont do that anymore as most of the time the kernels that
                              > come with the disto I use alway���s fit.
                              > >
                              > > But It is a good Idea to know how a kernel is built, and sometimes when
                              > I feel like optimizing my machine I do a kernel compile.. And its fun!
                              > >
                              >
                              > Thanks. Whenever I see what looks like someone telling someone else not to
                              > do something in Linux that is an accepted procedure I try to counter that.
                              > As far as I'm concerned, "replace any kernel with a 'vanilla' kernel from
                              > www.kernel.org BUT as the name of this group is Linux newbies I won't
                              > recommend doing this on a computer that you'll need to use" is about the
                              > biggest piece of bad advise I can think of.
                              >
                              > The name of the group is Linux Newbies but it isn't Perpetual Linux
                              > Newbies. Everyone has to take the training wheels off eventually and learn
                              > how to balance on their own.
                              >
                              > Building a Linux kernel is one of the traditional rites of passage in
                              > Linux too. A task that I believe is an integral part of the enrichment
                              > process. So in the spirit of having said all of that would everyone please
                              > join me in a chant, make, make, make, MAKE!
                              >
                              >
                              >


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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