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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] PC Tower

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  • J
    no. if the fans vibrate that much, they need to be replaced and vibration will be the least of your worries.
    Message 1 of 20 , Feb 19, 2013
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      no. if the fans vibrate that much, they need to be replaced and
      vibration will be the least of your worries.
    • highskywhy@yahoo.de
      good afternoon How can I update Linux example Xubuntu sudo apt-get update && dist upgrade Second question: What does update do? Sometimes also Siduction is
      Message 2 of 20 , Feb 27, 2013
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        good afternoon

        How can I update Linux example
        Xubuntu

        sudo apt-get update && dist upgrade


        Second question:
        What does update do?
        Sometimes also Siduction is working 40 minutes and doing a lot of things.
        Is it so much to do the update?

        Regards

        Sophie
      • highskywhy@yahoo.de
        ... No does mean it is no problem, isnt it? Regards Sophie
        Message 3 of 20 , Feb 27, 2013
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          Am 19.02.2013 13:48, schrieb J:
          > no. if the fans vibrate that much, they need to be replaced and
          > vibration will be the least of your worries.
          >

          No
          does mean
          it is no problem, isnt it?

          Regards Sophie
        • highskywhy@yahoo.de
          ... Thank You Sophie
          Message 4 of 20 , Feb 27, 2013
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            Am 19.02.2013 14:29, schrieb kwacka2@...:
            > Assuming that there are no ventilation outlets/inlets on the top of the
            > lower computer there should be no problem.
            Thank You
            Sophie
          • Pascal
            ... You got the command a little bit wrong. It should read: $ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade The dist-upgrade option only makes sense when
            Message 5 of 20 , Mar 4 1:10 AM
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              --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "highskywhy@..." <highskywhy@...> wrote:
              >
              > good afternoon
              >
              > How can I update Linux example
              > Xubuntu
              >
              > sudo apt-get update && dist upgrade


              You got the command a little bit wrong. It should read:

              $ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

              The dist-upgrade option only makes sense when you have changed the repository sources to the newer release of Xubuntu.


              > Second question:
              > What does update do?


              Update contacts the servers configured in your repository list (Files in /etc/apt/apt.conf) and looks whether any new packages or newer versions are available. It updates the file
              '/var/lib/dpkg/status' with the package lists found on the servers. That is important since apt will only let you search for and install new packages when it can find them in the local file.

              Have a look at:

              $ view /var/lib/dpkg/status

              You will see that a lot of packages are listed along with their version number and the
              installation status, i.e. whether it is installed or not.


              > Sometimes also Siduction is working 40 minutes and doing a lot of things.
              > Is it so much to do the update?


              I don't know why takes so long. When I was using Debian Unstable (Siduction is based upon it) that didn't take my computer so much time,even if there are new package versions added everyday. Sorry, can't help you here.


              Pascal
            • highskywhy@yahoo.de
              good morning Di Mär 05 09:09:36 2013 thank You for help ... You got the command a little bit wrong. It should read: $ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get
              Message 6 of 20 , Mar 5 12:30 AM
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                good morning
                Di Mär 05 09:09:36 2013
                thank You for help

                > sudo apt-get update && dist upgrade

                You got the command a little bit wrong. It should read:

                $ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
                *
                Question:
                How often do I have to say: Sudo?

                The dist-upgrade option only makes sense when you have changed the
                repository sources to the newer release of Xubuntu.
                *
                This I do not understand.
                I am using here Xubuntu now 13.04
                Until there was Pangoline there was an Update Center
                so I could update
                12.4 to 12.10 then 13.04
                but now there is no update center.
                There is an orange button
                offering:
                show update
                install updates
                look for updates
                start synaptic

                Is the button right to use:
                install updates
                or
                look for updates
                ?


                > Second question:
                > What does update do?

                Update contacts the servers configured in your repository list (Files in
                /etc/apt/apt.conf) and looks whether any new packages or newer versions
                are available. It updates the file
                '/var/lib/dpkg/status' with the package lists found on the servers. That
                is important since apt will only let you search for and install new
                packages when it can find them in the local file.
                *
                Sorry
                my question was:
                Why are there so many updates.
                Example.
                Every 9 days I do now update
                siducion and xubuntu.
                Most times 30 minutes and more is working the update.
                Hundreds of files are downloaded and installed.
                So the producers of Linux do so much work to update
                Kernel or what else?
                Because there is a lot of new software every week.
                Does update also update Gimp Firefox and all the other tools?


                Have a look at:

                $ view /var/lib/dpkg/status
                *
                Thank You.


                Regards
                Sophie
              • Pascal
                ... You have to say sudo every time you want execute a command with root permissions. Your sudo password gets cached for a certain amount of time (I do not
                Message 7 of 20 , Mar 5 3:41 AM
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                  --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "highskywhy@..." <highskywhy@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > good morning
                  > Di Mär 05 09:09:36 2013
                  > thank You for help
                  >
                  > > sudo apt-get update && dist upgrade
                  >
                  > You got the command a little bit wrong. It should read:
                  >
                  > $ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
                  > *
                  > Question:
                  > How often do I have to say: Sudo?
                  >

                  You have to say sudo every time you want execute a command with root permissions. Your sudo password gets cached for a certain amount of time (I do not know for how long, will look that one up later on), so you do not have to enter it repeatedly.

                  Personally, I don't use sudo, but switch to ROOT user instead.
                  That would be:
                  $ su -

                  su means switch user and when not providing a user name after it, you become ROOT. You have to provide the root password in order to gain root permissions permanently (For as long as you are logged in in that shell). The hyphen - after su means that you get the same PATH environment like ROOT, even though you started as a regular user when typing su -
                  That is important as the normal user may not execute certain commands which do not lie in her/his PATH environment. Try executing /sbin/fdisk -l. Although you are allowed to use fdisk without root permission the path /sbin is not available for you. Do not ask me what the rationale is behind this security? feature. Security by obfuscation?

                  To me using sudo is not safer than becoming ROOT in the first place. You can break your system either way. I use a ROOT-terminal, you would find that somewhere in the application menu (If you have GNOME-Terminal installed) under "Accessories" or "Zubehör". I changed the appearance for my ROOT-terminal to a blue background, so I visually get reminded that everything I do in this shell is done with admin rights and may break my system.
                  Well, that's just my point of view.


                  > The dist-upgrade option only makes sense when you have changed the
                  > repository sources to the newer release of Xubuntu.
                  > *
                  > This I do not understand.
                  > I am using here Xubuntu now 13.04

                  Which version do you want to upgrade to? It seems you're using a pre-release version, as the new (X)Ubuntu 13.04 won't come out until sometime in April this year. I do not think there is much you can upgrade to?


                  > Until there was Pangoline there was an Update Center
                  > so I could update
                  > 12.4 to 12.10 then 13.04
                  > but now there is no update center.
                  > There is an orange button
                  > offering:
                  > show update
                  > install updates
                  > look for updates
                  > start synaptic
                  >
                  > Is the button right to use:
                  > install updates
                  > or
                  > look for updates
                  > ?

                  In case you want to update your system and install new package versions do "look for updates" first (This should execute the command 'sudo apt-get update') and then "install updates" ('sudo apt-get upgrade')

                  I think you can do a dist-upgrade with Synaptic, but I don't use that, prefer the commandline by now, so I'm not sure.


                  >
                  > > Second question:
                  > > What does update do?
                  >
                  > Update contacts the servers configured in your repository list (Files in
                  > /etc/apt/apt.conf) and looks whether any new packages or newer versions
                  > are available. It updates the file
                  > '/var/lib/dpkg/status' with the package lists found on the servers. That
                  > is important since apt will only let you search for and install new
                  > packages when it can find them in the local file.
                  > *
                  > Sorry
                  > my question was:
                  > Why are there so many updates.
                  > Example.
                  > Every 9 days I do now update
                  > siducion and xubuntu.
                  > Most times 30 minutes and more is working the update.
                  > Hundreds of files are downloaded and installed.
                  > So the producers of Linux do so much work to update
                  > Kernel or what else?
                  > Because there is a lot of new software every week.
                  > Does update also update Gimp Firefox and all the other tools?
                  >

                  From the distance is hard to diagnose why your updating takes so long. But, updating/upgrading Siduction only every 9 days means that a lot of packages will get upgraded and thus have to be downloaded, so no wonder. It's based on Debian Unstable, and when I had Debian Unstable installed here I did an update/upgrade every day. So as to quicken up the process.


                  An Upgrade will get you newer version of Firefox or Gimp, say, when a newer version is available in the repositories. If not, then no. With most Linux distributions you are dependent on what the repositories provide and if there is not latest Firefox available for your Ubuntu version then bad luck. Although for Ubuntu there is option of PPAs (Personal Package Archives) which in some cases give you access to newer package versions.

                  Kernel updates are rather rare on Ubuntu. Most of the time only minor version steps are taken. As long as all the hardware works, I would not install a newer kernel version manually. Why fix a system that ain't broke. The advantages & additional features of the newest kernel are generally not relevant to regular desktop users. And with Ubuntu you have quite up-to-date kernel versions.

                  >
                  > Have a look at:
                  >
                  > $ view /var/lib/dpkg/status
                  > *
                  > Thank You.
                  >
                  >
                  > Regards
                  > Sophie
                  >
                • Paul
                  ... I use sudo -s Then exit when I am done.
                  Message 8 of 20 , Mar 5 8:57 AM
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                    --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Pascal" <pascal.bernhard@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > You have to say sudo every time you want execute a command with root permissions. Your sudo password gets cached for a certain amount of time (I do not know for how long, will look that one up later on), so you do not have to enter it repeatedly.
                    >
                    > Personally, I don't use sudo, but switch to ROOT user instead.

                    I use sudo -s

                    Then exit when I am done.
                  • C. Beck
                    ... ... There is no reason the latest version of whatever couldn t be built from source on your machine if desired. Granted that may still be
                    Message 9 of 20 , Mar 5 10:37 AM
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                      On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 5:41 AM, Pascal <pascal.bernhard@...> wrote:
                      >
                      <snip>
                      >
                      > If not, then no. With most Linux distributions you are dependent on what the
                      > repositories provide and if there is not latest Firefox available for your Ubuntu
                      > version then bad luck.

                      There is no reason the latest version of whatever couldn't be built
                      from source on your machine if desired. Granted that may still be
                      considered bad luck, but it is an option.

                      >
                      > Kernel updates are rather rare on Ubuntu. Most of the time only minor version steps
                      > are taken. As long as all the hardware works, I would not install a newer kernel
                      > version manually. Why fix a system that ain't broke.

                      I'd like to think updates are often to improve performance and/or fix
                      security holes. Both of those seem like a noble reason to update you
                      system, including the Kernel. It is usually simple enough to read the
                      release notes and see whether it is important. But I don't think
                      adding new drivers is the only reason for updates.

                      > The advantages & additional features of the newest kernel are generally not
                      > relevant to regular desktop users. And with Ubuntu you have quite up-to-date kernel versions.

                      I do not agree with this scoping idea that any given update will not
                      be relevant to a user, and I would not personally advise anyone like
                      that. I would instead encourage new users to look for release notes,
                      try to evaluate the changes, and make at least a somewhat informed
                      decision on whether the update should be applied or not.


                      >
                      >
                      > >
                      > > Have a look at:
                      > >
                      > > $ view /var/lib/dpkg/status
                      > > *
                      > > Thank You.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Regards
                      > > Sophie
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                    • highskywhy@yahoo.de
                      Do Mär 07 17:51:16 2013 Good afternoon. Thank You for help. ... You have to say sudo every time you want execute a command with root permissions. * OK.
                      Message 10 of 20 , Mar 7 9:08 AM
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                        Do Mär 07 17:51:16 2013
                        Good afternoon.
                        Thank You for help.

                        > How often do I have to say: Sudo?
                        >

                        You have to say sudo every time you want execute a command with root
                        permissions.
                        *
                        OK.

                        Personally, I don't use sudo, but switch to ROOT user instead.
                        That would be:
                        $ su -
                        *
                        Using Siduction
                        there I use su.

                        It is no problem
                        to write sudo with every command.

                        > The dist-upgrade option only makes sense when you have changed the
                        > repository sources to the newer release of Xubuntu.
                        > *
                        > This I do not understand.
                        > I am using here Xubuntu now 13.04

                        Which version do you want to upgrade to?
                        *
                        I want to update during Octobre 2013 13.04 to 13.10.
                        There is time to learn it.

                        It seems you're using a pre-release version, as the new (X)Ubuntu
                        13.04 won't come out until sometime in April this year.
                        *
                        This is funny.
                        I did update
                        I wanted to change 12.4 to 12.10 but then there is now
                        13.04.

                        Did I do something wrong?


                        > Until there was Pangoline there was an Update Center
                        > so I could update
                        > 12.4 to 12.10 then 13.04
                        > but now there is no update center.
                        > There is an orange button
                        > offering:
                        > show update
                        > install updates
                        > look for updates
                        > start synaptic
                        >
                        > Is the button right to use:
                        > install updates
                        > or
                        > look for updates
                        > ?

                        In case you want to update your system and install new package versions
                        do "look for updates" first (This should execute the command 'sudo
                        apt-get update') and then "install updates" ('sudo apt-get upgrade')
                        *
                        Thank You.


                        I think you can do a dist-upgrade with Synaptic, but I don't use that,
                        prefer the commandline by now, so I'm not sure.
                        *
                        I prefer the terminal.

                        >
                        > > Second question:
                        > > What does update do?
                        >
                        > Update contacts the servers configured in your repository list (Files in
                        > /etc/apt/apt.conf) and looks whether any new packages or newer versions
                        > are available. It updates the file
                        > '/var/lib/dpkg/status' with the package lists found on the servers. That
                        > is important since apt will only let you search for and install new
                        > packages when it can find them in the local file.
                        > *
                        > Sorry
                        > my question was:
                        > Why are there so many updates.
                        > Example.
                        > Every 9 days I do now update
                        > siduction and xubuntu.
                        > Most times 30 minutes and more is working the update.
                        > Hundreds of files are downloaded and installed.
                        > So the producers of Linux do so much work to update
                        > Kernel or what else?
                        > Because there is a lot of new software every week.
                        > Does update also update Gimp Firefox and all the other tools?
                        >

                        >From the distance is hard to diagnose why your updating takes so long.
                        But, updating/upgrading Siduction only every 9 days means that a lot of
                        packages will get upgraded and thus have to be downloaded, so no wonder.
                        *
                        YES
                        But I am interested
                        what the producers of Linux do.
                        Is there during one week so much to update.
                        This is not a technical question
                        I am just interested in this.

                        It's based on Debian Unstable, and when I had Debian Unstable installed
                        here I did an update/upgrade every day. So as to quicken up the process.
                        *
                        Thank You.


                        An Upgrade will get you newer version of Firefox or Gimp, say, when a
                        newer version is available in the repositories. If not, then no. With
                        most Linux distributions you are dependent on what the repositories
                        provide and if there is not latest Firefox available for your Ubuntu
                        version then bad luck. Although for Ubuntu there is option of PPAs
                        (Personal Package Archives) which in some cases give you access to newer
                        package versions.
                        *
                        Thank You.


                        Regards
                        Sophie
                      • highskywhy@yahoo.de
                        Do Mär 07 17:59:40 2013 Good afternoon Thank You for help. ... permissions. Your sudo password gets cached for a certain amount of time (I do not know for how
                        Message 11 of 20 , Mar 7 9:09 AM
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                          Do Mär 07 17:59:40 2013
                          Good afternoon
                          Thank You for help.

                          > You have to say sudo every time you want execute a command with root
                          permissions. Your sudo password gets cached for a certain amount of time
                          (I do not know for how long, will look that one up later on), so you do
                          not have to enter it repeatedly.
                          >
                          > Personally, I don't use sudo, but switch to ROOT user instead.

                          I use sudo -s

                          Then exit when I am done.
                          *
                          Does sudo -s be valid during the whole session
                          or until I close the terminal?

                          Regards
                          Sophie
                        • Paul
                          ... ... I ve often seen plenty of reasons later code could not be built. Configure scripts look for = versions of development packages to build
                          Message 12 of 20 , Mar 8 5:04 AM
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                            --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "C. Beck" <usabecker@...> wrote:

                            <snip>

                            > There is no reason the latest version of whatever couldn't be built
                            > from source on your machine if desired. Granted that may still be
                            > considered bad luck, but it is an option.
                            >

                            I've often seen plenty of reasons later code could not be built. Configure scripts look for >= versions of development packages to build against. Often if one software package is out of date many are, and that leaves you with tool chains that do not meet minimum requirements.

                            I run Debian stable so I see it all of the time. I don't know why developers set such stringent standards, I suspect they don't even realize they're doing it half of the time, it works for them, so they don't give it another thought. Everyone should be running the distribution they are, etc. etc. It could also be laziness, or simple incompetence too.
                          • C. Beck
                            ... Configure scripts look for = versions of development packages to build against. Often if one software package is out of date many are, and that leaves you
                            Message 13 of 20 , Mar 8 10:39 AM
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                              On Mar 8, 2013 7:04 AM, "Paul" <pfrederick1@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "C. Beck" <usabecker@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > <snip>
                              >
                              >
                              > > There is no reason the latest version of whatever couldn't be built
                              > > from source on your machine if desired. Granted that may still be
                              > > considered bad luck, but it is an option.
                              > >
                              >
                              > I've often seen plenty of reasons later code could not be built.
                              Configure scripts look for >= versions of development packages to build
                              against. Often if one software package is out of date many are, and that
                              leaves you with tool chains that do not meet minimum requirements.

                              Yeah, that would be what I consider the bad luck part. My point was just
                              that relying on a distribution's repositories is not the only option
                              available for installing software in linux - That's what the comment I
                              responded to seemed to be saying. There are often ways around dependency
                              issues if a program is wanted bad enough - at least that has been my
                              limited experience.

                              >
                              > I run Debian stable so I see it all of the time. I don't know why
                              developers set such stringent standards, I suspect they don't even realize
                              they're doing it half of the time, it works for them, so they don't give it
                              another thought. Everyone should be running the distribution they are, etc.
                              etc. It could also be laziness, or simple incompetence too.

                              I'm not in a position to judge them, but it can be very annoying at times,
                              that is for sure.


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Paul
                              ... Well my limited experience began in 1996 for Linux. For the first 6 years I ran Linux I mainly used Slackware too. Back then Slackware wasn t known for its
                              Message 14 of 20 , Mar 8 11:12 PM
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                                --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "C. Beck" <usabecker@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Yeah, that would be what I consider the bad luck part. My point was just
                                > that relying on a distribution's repositories is not the only option
                                > available for installing software in linux - That's what the comment I
                                > responded to seemed to be saying. There are often ways around dependency
                                > issues if a program is wanted bad enough - at least that has been my
                                > limited experience.
                                >

                                Well my limited experience began in 1996 for Linux. For the first 6 years I ran Linux I mainly used Slackware too. Back then Slackware wasn't known for its strong package management either. It was a great system, simple enough anyone could hack around with it, solid enough it was predictable out of the box too. But once you started adding to it on your own then things quickly got very difficult to keep up with.

                                By 2001 I'd given that life up for the much easier RPM method of dealing with things. That was a golden era then, full of promise, and hope for the future. Then Red Hat became a publicly traded company, but that is a story for another time ...

                                Anyhow, be careful what you want, you just may get it, then come to realize it isn't worth the trouble after all.

                                Fact is there is a reason every distribution uses virtually the same scheme of package management that keeps track of versions, dependencies, and files today. Because no one really wants to do that on their own. It is in a word drudgery. It is dull, boring, tedious, and hard too! But most of all it is ultimately a waste of time. Duplication of effort always is.
                              • highskywhy@yahoo.de
                                Sa Mär 09 13:10:36 2013 Good afternoon Thank You for help. ... ... what the ... your Ubuntu ... There is no reason the latest version of whatever
                                Message 15 of 20 , Mar 9 4:19 AM
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                                  Sa Mär 09 13:10:36 2013
                                  Good afternoon
                                  Thank You for help.


                                  On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 5:41 AM, Pascal <pascal.bernhard@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  <snip>
                                  >
                                  > If not, then no. With most Linux distributions you are dependent on
                                  what the
                                  > repositories provide and if there is not latest Firefox available for
                                  your Ubuntu
                                  > version then bad luck.

                                  There is no reason the latest version of whatever couldn't be built
                                  from source on your machine if desired. Granted that may still be
                                  considered bad luck, but it is an option.
                                  *
                                  Thank You.

                                  > Kernel updates are rather rare on Ubuntu. Most of the time only minor
                                  version steps
                                  > are taken. As long as all the hardware works, I would not install a
                                  newer kernel
                                  > version manually. Why fix a system that ain't broke.

                                  I'd like to think updates are often to improve performance and/or fix
                                  security holes.
                                  *
                                  But it is a lot
                                  isnt it.

                                  Regards
                                  Sophie
                                • highskywhy@yahoo.de
                                  Sa Mär 09 13:19:41 2013 Good afternoon Thank You for help. ... When you close a terminal you are done with that session. sudo -s is valid until I close the
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Mar 9 5:10 AM
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                                    Sa Mär 09 13:19:41 2013
                                    Good afternoon
                                    Thank You for help.

                                    > Does sudo -s be valid during the whole session
                                    > or until I close the terminal?


                                    When you close a terminal you are done with that session.

                                    sudo -s is valid
                                    until I close the terminal
                                    isnt it.

                                    Regards
                                    Sophie
                                  • highskywhy@yahoo.de
                                    Sa Mär 09 13:19:41 2013 Good afternoon Thank You for help. ... I ve often seen plenty of reasons later code could not be built. Configure scripts look for =
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Mar 9 5:16 AM
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                                      Sa Mär 09 13:19:41 2013
                                      Good afternoon
                                      Thank You for help.

                                      > There is no reason the latest version of whatever couldn't be built
                                      > from source on your machine if desired. Granted that may still be
                                      > considered bad luck, but it is an option.
                                      >

                                      I've often seen plenty of reasons later code could not be built.
                                      Configure scripts look for >= versions of development packages to build
                                      against. Often if one software package is out of date many are, and that
                                      leaves you with tool chains that do not meet minimum requirements.
                                      *
                                      OK


                                      I run Debian stable so I see it all of the time. I don't know why
                                      developers set such stringent standards, I suspect they don't even
                                      realize they're doing it half of the time, it works for them, so they
                                      don't give it another thought. Everyone should be running the
                                      distribution they are, etc. etc. It could also be laziness, or simple
                                      incompetence too.
                                      *
                                      OK
                                      Question:
                                      I use Gimp.
                                      I can start it with the terminal.
                                      But I cannot start it with the gui. Then there is an error.
                                      Is their a way to repeat it?
                                      *
                                      Question:
                                      I install on one Linux: Audio-Rekorder
                                      Fine.
                                      I install on another Linux: Audio Rekorder. But this time I cannot use
                                      the program. What shall I do?

                                      Regards
                                      Sophie
                                    • highskywhy@yahoo.de
                                      Sa Mär 09 13:19:41 2013 Good afternoon Thank You for help. ... Configure scripts look for = versions of development packages to build against. Often if one
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Mar 9 5:20 AM
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                                        Sa Mär 09 13:19:41 2013
                                        Good afternoon
                                        Thank You for help.

                                        > > There is no reason the latest version of whatever couldn't be built
                                        > > from source on your machine if desired. Granted that may still be
                                        > > considered bad luck, but it is an option.
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        > I've often seen plenty of reasons later code could not be built.
                                        Configure scripts look for >= versions of development packages to build
                                        against. Often if one software package is out of date many are, and that
                                        leaves you with tool chains that do not meet minimum requirements.

                                        Yeah, that would be what I consider the bad luck part. My point was just
                                        that relying on a distribution's repositories is not the only option
                                        available for installing software in linux - That's what the comment I
                                        responded to seemed to be saying. There are often ways around dependency
                                        issues if a program is wanted bad enough - at least that has been my
                                        limited experience.
                                        *
                                        OK


                                        >
                                        > I run Debian stable so I see it all of the time. I don't know why
                                        developers set such stringent standards, I suspect they don't even realize
                                        they're doing it half of the time, it works for them, so they don't give it
                                        another thought. Everyone should be running the distribution they are, etc.
                                        etc. It could also be laziness, or simple incompetence too.

                                        I'm not in a position to judge them, but it can be very annoying at times,
                                        that is for sure.
                                        *

                                        Is there a way to clean Linux
                                        if there are update-problems?

                                        Regards
                                        Sophie
                                      • highskywhy@yahoo.de
                                        Sa Mär 09 13:19:41 2013 Good afternoon Thank You for help. ... was just ... dependency ... * Is the best way if the updates does make problems with the os to
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Mar 9 5:22 AM
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                                          Sa Mär 09 13:19:41 2013
                                          Good afternoon
                                          Thank You for help.
                                          > >
                                          > > Yeah, that would be what I consider the bad luck part. My point
                                          was just
                                          > > that relying on a distribution's repositories is not the only option
                                          > > available for installing software in linux - That's what the comment I
                                          > > responded to seemed to be saying. There are often ways around
                                          dependency
                                          > > issues if a program is wanted bad enough - at least that has been my
                                          > > limited experience.
                                          > >
                                          >
                                          > Well my limited experience began in 1996 for Linux. For the first 6
                                          > years I ran Linux I mainly used Slackware too. Back then Slackware
                                          > wasn't known for its strong package management either. It was a great
                                          > system, simple enough anyone could hack around with it, solid enough it
                                          > was predictable out of the box too. But once you started adding to it on
                                          > your own then things quickly got very difficult to keep up with.
                                          >
                                          > By 2001 I'd given that life up for the much easier RPM method of dealing
                                          > with things. That was a golden era then, full of promise, and hope for
                                          > the future. Then Red Hat became a publicly traded company, but that is a
                                          > story for another time ...
                                          >
                                          > Anyhow, be careful what you want, you just may get it, then come to
                                          > realize it isn't worth the trouble after all.
                                          >
                                          > Fact is there is a reason every distribution uses virtually the same
                                          > scheme of package management that keeps track of versions, dependencies,
                                          > and files today. Because no one really wants to do that on their own. It
                                          > is in a word drudgery. It is dull, boring, tedious, and hard too! But
                                          > most of all it is ultimately a waste of time. Duplication of effort
                                          > always is.
                                          *
                                          Is the best way
                                          if the updates does make problems with the os
                                          to download a new iso-file and install Linux again
                                          or is there a cleaning procedure?

                                          Regards
                                          Sophie
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