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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Distribution Question

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  • Scott
    ... Not very. That really hasn t been true for years. Yum, the package handling tool for RedHat and some offshoots, handles things very well nowadays. In the
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 7, 2013
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      On Thu, Feb 07, 2013 at 05:55:26PM -0000, Charles wrote:
      >
      > I've been reading a Linux newbie guide and I'm trying to decide which distro to use. Toward the bottom of this page http://tinyurl.com/a57w9ln there is a chart makes reference to dependency problems and in Chapter 8 the "Dependency Hell" of RPM based distributions is mentioned.
      >
      > How worried should I be about the dependency issue?
      >

      Not very. That really hasn't been true for years. Yum, the package
      handling tool for RedHat and some offshoots, handles things very well
      nowadays. In the old days, pre yum, one would run the command rpm -ivh
      whatever to install a package, only to have it fail because it was missing
      something. Then, when you searched for the missing thing, it turned out
      that you needed yet another rpm to install the missing rpm.

      However, these days, almost all distributions, including those that use
      RPMs, have very good package management programs that will pull in all
      dependencies. On occasion, due to various factors, any of them might fail,
      but 99 percent of the time, whether one uses rpms or debs package
      installation is not a problem.



      >
      > I found this groups link to the Top Ten Distributions. That is a lot of information to digest. I know there can be no definitive answer to this question and I don't want to start a flame war but I would be interested in hearing some advice on which distribution to choose.
      >

      For a beginner, Ubuntu or Mint seem to be the best choices. In addition,
      both have pretty friendly and helpful forums.


      --
      Scott Robbins
      PGP keyID EB3467D6
      ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
      gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

      Oswin: Doesn't she seem a bit too angry to you?
      Amy: Well, somebody's never been to Scotland.
    • Charles Doubek
      Thanks Scott, I will look into the two that you mentioned.    ... Not very. That really hasn t been true for years. Yum, the package handling tool for
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 8, 2013
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        Thanks Scott, I will look into the two that you mentioned. 



         
        On Thu, Feb 07, 2013 at 05:55:26PM -0000, Charles wrote:
        >
        > I've been reading a Linux newbie guide and I'm trying to decide which distro to use. Toward the bottom of this page http://tinyurl.com/a57w9ln there is a chart makes reference to dependency problems and in Chapter 8 the "Dependency Hell" of RPM based distributions is mentioned.
        >
        > How worried should I be about the dependency issue?
        >

        Not very. That really hasn't been true for years. Yum, the package
        handling tool for RedHat and some offshoots, handles things very well
        nowadays. In the old days, pre yum, one would run the command rpm -ivh
        whatever to install a package, only to have it fail because it was missing
        something. Then, when you searched for the missing thing, it turned out
        that you needed yet another rpm to install the missing rpm.

        However, these days, almost all distributions, including those that use
        RPMs, have very good package management programs that will pull in all
        dependencies. On occasion, due to various factors, any of them might fail,
        but 99 percent of the time, whether one uses rpms or debs package
        installation is not a problem.

        >
        > I found this groups link to the Top Ten Distributions. That is a lot of information to digest. I know there can be no definitive answer to this question and I don't want to start a flame war but I would be interested in hearing some advice on which distribution to choose.
        >

        For a beginner, Ubuntu or Mint seem to be the best choices. In addition,
        both have pretty friendly and helpful forums.

        --
        Scott Robbins
        PGP keyID EB3467D6
        ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
        gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

        Oswin: Doesn't she seem a bit too angry to you?
        Amy: Well, somebody's never been to Scotland.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wombat
        It s only my own experience but I liked XUbuntu a lot on my netbook until I fiddled around one time too many and scragged it, so am currently installing Mint
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 8, 2013
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          It's only my own experience but I liked XUbuntu a lot on my netbook until I fiddled around one time too many and scragged it, so am currently installing Mint 13 xfce edition (I like xfce!) which seems to work out of the box . Much depends on your system and your personal preferences.
          The Wombat

          Charles Doubek <hartselle48@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          >Thanks Scott, I will look into the two that you mentioned. 
          >
          >
          >

          >On Thu, Feb 07, 2013 at 05:55:26PM -0000, Charles wrote:
          >>
          >> I've been reading a Linux newbie guide and I'm trying to decide which
          >distro to use. Toward the bottom of this page
          >http://tinyurl.com/a57w9ln there is a chart makes reference to
          >dependency problems and in Chapter 8 the "Dependency Hell" of RPM based
          >distributions is mentioned.
          >>
          >> How worried should I be about the dependency issue?
          >>
          >
          >Not very. That really hasn't been true for years. Yum, the package
          >handling tool for RedHat and some offshoots, handles things very well
          >nowadays. In the old days, pre yum, one would run the command rpm -ivh
          >whatever to install a package, only to have it fail because it was
          >missing
          >something. Then, when you searched for the missing thing, it turned
          >out
          >that you needed yet another rpm to install the missing rpm.
          >
          >However, these days, almost all distributions, including those that use
          >RPMs, have very good package management programs that will pull in all
          >dependencies. On occasion, due to various factors, any of them might
          >fail,
          >but 99 percent of the time, whether one uses rpms or debs package
          >installation is not a problem.
          >
          >>
          >> I found this groups link to the Top Ten Distributions. That is a lot
          >of information to digest. I know there can be no definitive answer to
          >this question and I don't want to start a flame war but I would be
          >interested in hearing some advice on which distribution to choose.
          >>
          >
          >For a beginner, Ubuntu or Mint seem to be the best choices. In
          >addition,
          >both have pretty friendly and helpful forums.
          >
          >--
          >Scott Robbins
          >PGP keyID EB3467D6
          >( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
          >gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
          >
          >Oswin: Doesn't she seem a bit too angry to you?
          >Amy: Well, somebody's never been to Scotland.
          >
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------
          >
          >To unsubscribe from this list, please email
          >LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.Yahoo!
          >Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          --
          Sent from my Android phone with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Paul
          ... Mint and XFCE are good stuff. I still don t understand why distributions put out Desktop Environment editions though. You can change those anytime you
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 8, 2013
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            --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, wombat wrote:
            >
            > It's only my own experience but I liked XUbuntu a lot on my netbook until I fiddled around one time too many and scragged it, so am currently installing Mint 13 xfce edition (I like xfce!) which seems to work out of the box . Much depends on your system and your personal preferences.
            > The Wombat
            >
            > Charles Doubek wrote:
            >

            Mint and XFCE are good stuff. I still don't understand why distributions put out Desktop Environment editions though. You can change those anytime you like. The classic way is to simply edit your ~/.xinitrc file. A long time ago Window Managers came with menu options where you could change on the fly. Which was pretty neat, because after you selected a Window Manager off the menu you'd switch, but retain whatever applications you happened to be running at the time. Your X Window session wouldn't even restart. I think that trick was accomplished by making another application the parent process instead of the Window Manager.

            Now folks seem to think you need to do a new installation to change? The most you should ever have to do in order to switch is start a new X session.
          • Joan Leach
            So true, on Zorin 6.x core 64-bit, I added LXDE and KDE and just select when I log in. I decided to add then when some updates triggered the Zorin Start menu
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 8, 2013
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              So true, on Zorin 6.x core 64-bit, I added LXDE and KDE and just select when I log in. I decided to add then when some updates triggered the Zorin Start menu to be hijacked by the Ubuntu Start button.
              I was going to try Ultimate Linux, but one stick of RAM going bad and a drop down to a slower AMD AM2 CPU, put that on the back burner for awhile.
              Joan in Reno

              --- On Fri, 2/8/13, Paul <pfrederick1@...> wrote:

              From: Paul <pfrederick1@...>
              Subject: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: Distribution Question
              To: LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, February 8, 2013, 5:48 PM
















               













              --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, wombat wrote:

              >

              > It's only my own experience but I liked XUbuntu a lot on my netbook until I fiddled around one time too many and scragged it, so am currently installing Mint 13 xfce edition (I like xfce!) which seems to work out of the box . Much depends on your system and your personal preferences.

              > The Wombat

              >

              > Charles Doubek wrote:

              >



              Mint and XFCE are good stuff. I still don't understand why distributions put out Desktop Environment editions though. You can change those anytime you like. The classic way is to simply edit your ~/.xinitrc file. A long time ago Window Managers came with menu options where you could change on the fly. Which was pretty neat, because after you selected a Window Manager off the menu you'd switch, but retain whatever applications you happened to be running at the time. Your X Window session wouldn't even restart. I think that trick was accomplished by making another application the parent process instead of the Window Manager.



              Now folks seem to think you need to do a new installation to change? The most you should ever have to do in order to switch is start a new X session.



























              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Paul
              ... By when you log in do you mean with a Display Manager, such as gdm? If yes then those often contain menus where one may choose which Window Manager to use.
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 9, 2013
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                --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Joan Leach wrote:
                >
                > So true, on Zorin 6.x core 64-bit, I added LXDE and KDE and just select when I log in. I decided to add then when some updates triggered the Zorin Start menu to be hijacked by the Ubuntu Start button.
                > I was going to try Ultimate Linux, but one stick of RAM going bad and a drop down to a slower AMD AM2 CPU, put that on the back burner for awhile.
                > Joan in Reno
                >

                By when you log in do you mean with a Display Manager, such as gdm? If yes then those often contain menus where one may choose which Window Manager to use. I suppose DMs are one big difference between today and long ago. I used to log in at the console myself, then startx, at the command prompt. Mostly so if X ever messed up on me it would be easier to recover my system.

                No warranty on that RAM stick huh? Often they have lifetime guarantees. I'm not sure how well those are honored though. The PC market does seem to have fallen on hard times anymore. I'm glad I built my last system when I did. I don't think I could have done any better since. There is better hardware available today of course, but it is all so expensive lately. I believe mobile has made the economies of scale tip against us now.
              • chi_joan_pc
                ... Yes, I remembered that there was a symbol on the top right, I think, that issued that menu. But if X doesn t start like in Slackware, I try startx. ... I
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 9, 2013
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                  --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Paul" wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Joan Leach wrote:
                  > >
                  > > So true, on Zorin 6.x core 64-bit, I added LXDE and KDE and just select when I log in. I decided to add then when some updates triggered the Zorin Start menu to be hijacked by the Ubuntu Start button.
                  > > I was going to try Ultimate Linux, but one stick of RAM going bad and a drop down to a slower AMD AM2 CPU, put that on the back burner for awhile.
                  > > Joan in Reno
                  > >
                  >
                  > By when you log in do you mean with a Display Manager, such as gdm? If yes then those often contain menus where one may choose which Window Manager to use. I suppose DMs are one big difference between today and long ago. I used to log in at the console myself, then startx, at the command prompt. Mostly so if X ever messed up on me it would be easier to recover my system.

                  Yes, I remembered that there was a symbol on the top right, I think, that issued that menu. But if X doesn't start like in Slackware, I try startx.
                  >
                  > No warranty on that RAM stick huh? Often they have lifetime guarantees. I'm not sure how well those are honored though. The PC market does seem to have fallen on hard times anymore. I'm glad I built my last system when I did. I don't think I could have done any better since. There is better hardware available today of course, but it is all so expensive lately. I believe mobile has made the economies of scale tip against us now.
                  >
                  I have the PNY package that the 2-1GB sticks came in, I bought it with the MSI motherboard and AMD AM2 940 socket CPU and PCI-E VGA card when I worked at CompUSA. I could've kicked myself when I bent and broke one of those pins on it. The only good thing is it no longer costs almost $200, on to EBay I suppose. I never had RAM go bad and it looked like it was the VGA card, then I guessed the MOBO. When the replacement arrived, I saw it didn't work either, that's when I tried pulling one RAM stick at a time. I tried the one that worked in both slots to be sure it wasn't the slot. So now I will be buying two CPUs eventually.

                  I usually get older parts from other techs, since they know Linux can use older stuff. Then I try to trade or give the computers away, but those wanting laptops and tablets are making it harder.

                  Joan in Reno
                • Paul
                  ... I ve had lots of RAM go bad on me. I d have to say it is one of the more common hardware problems to have. I don t even think high end CPUs have as many
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 9, 2013
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                    --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "chi_joan_pc" wrote:
                    >
                    > I have the PNY package that the 2-1GB sticks came in, I bought it with the MSI motherboard and AMD AM2 940 socket CPU and PCI-E VGA card when I worked at CompUSA. I could've kicked myself when I bent and broke one of those pins on it. The only good thing is it no longer costs almost $200, on to EBay I suppose. I never had RAM go bad and it looked like it was the VGA card, then I guessed the MOBO. When the replacement arrived, I saw it didn't work either, that's when I tried pulling one RAM stick at a time. I tried the one that worked in both slots to be sure it wasn't the slot. So now I will be buying two CPUs eventually.
                    >
                    > I usually get older parts from other techs, since they know Linux can use older stuff. Then I try to trade or give the computers away, but those wanting laptops and tablets are making it harder.
                    >
                    > Joan in Reno
                    >

                    I've had lots of RAM go bad on me. I'd have to say it is one of the more common hardware problems to have. I don't even think high end CPUs have as many failure points in them yet as a 1 gigabyte RAM module has in it. Although what exactly happens inside RAM that makes it fail I've no idea. I always look at RAM I'm unfamiliar with as faulty until tested good.

                    The last RAM failure I had here was easy to diagnose, The machine ran, but acted like it only had 22MB of RAM, even though it had 512MB installed. I tried to open up a web browser and it got really slow! So I closed that, opened up a terminal, typed free -m and was like ah ha! As far as Linux was concerned I only had 22MB of RAM installed.

                    Shutdown, stick swap, and all was well. Until I tried opening that browser up everything seemed OK to me. My whole OS, and X session was fitting into that 22MB. I still can't figure out how I used to run Linux on 16MB of RAM with my 486 DX4-100. It seemed normal at the time ...

                    Video adapters may be a close second to RAM modules though. I've seen a number of those bad over the years.
                  • highskywhy@yahoo.de
                    good morning my experiences a linux beginner siduction and xubuntu are best for beginner siduction has a own small community and friendly people always helped
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 13, 2013
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                      good morning
                      my experiences a linux beginner

                      siduction and xubuntu are best for beginner
                      siduction has a own small community
                      and friendly people always helped me.
                      xubuntu is better then ubuntu.
                      all others distris
                      I tried 20
                      did make problems mint suse fedora slitaz mint dsl lubuntu and so on.
                      regards sophie


                      Am 09.02.2013 01:14, schrieb wombat:
                      > It's only my own experience but I liked XUbuntu a lot on my netbook
                      > until I fiddled around one time too many and scragged it, so am
                      > currently installing Mint 13 xfce edition (I like xfce!) which seems to
                      > work out of the box . Much depends on your system and your personal
                      > preferences.
                      > The Wombat
                      >
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