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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: NEWBIE with first question

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  • highskywhy@yahoo.de
    Fr Dez 28 17:17:12 2012 Good evening. ... happen to have installed, on a KDE system that would be kwrite, and on Gnome gedit. * Is is possible to start an
    Message 1 of 53 , Dec 28, 2012
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      Fr Dez 28 17:17:12 2012

      Good evening.

      >>
      >> Do Dez 27 18:06:28 2012
      >> Good evening.
      >> Thank You for help.
      >>
      >>> The sources list edit is a editing a text file, but you
      >> will need to use
      >>> sudo to open the editor. That is complicated for a
      >> newbie.
      >>> Roy
      >>> Using Kubuntu 12.10, 64-bit
      >>> Location: Canada
      >> Should I open
      >> Sudo
      >> passwort
      >> mc
      >> and there the editor?
      >
      > I don't use Midnite Commander. I just use whatever GUI editor I
      happen to have installed, on a KDE system that would be kwrite, and on
      Gnome gedit.
      *
      Is is possible to start an editor with the rights of the admin?

      >> The syntax of /etc/apt/sources.list is simple enough. I feel
      >> it is certainly worthwhile to master. I would be missing
      >> critical system components if it was not for adding
      >> repository locations to my file.
      >> *
      >> Is it dangerous to open system files?
      >
      > It is only dangerous if you make a mistake. How dangerous depends on
      the error too. I've never crippled a system by making an editing error
      in a configuration file, but that is not to say it is impossible to do.
      I have made plenty of mistakes and had to go back and repair them too.
      Then usually things that I want to work don't until I have corrected my
      mistakes. Often they weren't working before I made mistakes either so
      the damage is inconsequential.
      *
      Ok.


      > One way to protect yourself from editing errors is to make a backup
      file of the file you plan on editing before you make any changes to it.
      That way if things go badly you can revert to the original file.
      *
      Can a problem only happen during booting?
      And if really there is a problem, should then I boot with a Live-CD?
      >> *

      > Synaptic is good if you don't know what you are looking for, aptitude
      is better if you do. I guess every new user should try to scroll through
      synaptic once. I used to try on every fresh install I did.
      *
      I did it very often.
      Question:
      What is Midori and what is Midori private?


      > Pro tip: Make sure all of your repository sources are enabled. Often
      the "contrib" and "non-free" can be disabled by default. There are
      useful software packages located in those categories. How packages end
      up being classified is beyond me trying to explain it, and those names
      likely don't mean what you may think they do. "non-free" for instance
      doesn't mean it costs you any money, it just means the source code may
      not be available. Which if all you want to do is run a program is not
      too important to most users.
      >
      > I don't run Ubuntu so I don't know what their policies are regarding
      defaults. But they essentially borrow the system from the distribution I
      do run, Debian, so it basically works the same.
      *
      Thank You for help.



      Regards Sophie
    • highskywhy@yahoo.de
      Do Okt 10 14:18:36 2013 Good afternoon! Thank You for email and help. Well if Xubuntu works anything like Debian you have to edit the file:
      Message 53 of 53 , Oct 10, 2013
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        Do Okt 10 14:18:36 2013
        Good afternoon!
        Thank You for email and help.



        Well if Xubuntu works anything like Debian you have to edit the file:

        /etc/apt/sources.list
        *
        Is this the most easy way?


        Find all of the instances of the old version you want to switch from and
        change them to the new version you want to switch to, and save that.
        Then do an aptitude update and after that aptitude full-upgrade


        I don't use apt-get myself as it is depreciated in favor of aptitude
        today in Debian. Apt-get still kind of works, but it is just old junk today.


        Although there sometimes are other steps you need to take first. It
        depends what you're upgrading from. Sometimes there are specific
        packages you have to upgrade first, before you upgrade the whole system.
        So you are best off following specific instructions that pertain to the
        distribution, and version you are currently running.


        Unfortunately with Xubuntu the upgrade page is a 404


        http://xubuntu.org/upgrading/


        http://i.imgur.com/YygQP3b.png


        So that is kind of junky.


        You are upgrading BTW, not updating. It is a bit different.
        *
        Thank You for help.
        Sophie
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