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Re: (unknown)

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  • Paul
    ... sudo su? Why not sudo -s? sudo su sounds too much like a Phil Collins song for my tastes.
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 20, 2012
      --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Roy <linuxcanuck@...> wrote:
      >
      > You use root in Ubuntu using sudo. There is no separate root password or a
      > root user. To use it, you use the command sudo before the operation such as
      > 'sudo nautilus' will open the file manager as root or 'sudo apt-get update'
      > to update your package list. You always use sudo before the command for
      > anything requiring root access. You will only be asked for the password the
      > first time, though. You can use 'sudo su' to switch to root and then not
      > bother with sudo anymore (for that terminal session). You will get the
      > traditional # to show you are root instead of the $ used in sudo.
      >
      > Let us know if the password problem continues. That can be fixed too.
      >

      sudo su?

      Why not sudo -s?

      sudo su sounds too much like a Phil Collins song for my tastes.
    • Roy
      I guess it is easier to remember for Debian or Fedora users to use su than -s because that is the terminal command in those environments. Both su an -s will
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 20, 2012
        I guess it is easier to remember for Debian or Fedora users to use su than
        -s because that is the terminal command in those environments. Both su an
        -s will work. I recommend using whatever you can remember, but just be
        consistent. Insisting on one way can lead to confusion in my experience. In
        Fedora it is su - to make things more confusing. But in Debian it is just
        su. I find telling people to use su is more consistent with the way it is
        done by Debian. If one is coming from more of a Unix or BSD background then
        sudo -s makes sense, but these people are rare. I blame Canonical for
        mixing sudo into a Debian shell. ;) It confounded me for a long time and
        now I struggle with su - in Fedora.

        Roy
        Using Kubuntu 12.04, 64-bit
        Location: Canada


        On 20 August 2012 15:01, Paul <pfrederick1@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Roy <linuxcanuck@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > You use root in Ubuntu using sudo. There is no separate root password or
        > a
        > > root user. To use it, you use the command sudo before the operation such
        > as
        > > 'sudo nautilus' will open the file manager as root or 'sudo apt-get
        > update'
        > > to update your package list. You always use sudo before the command for
        > > anything requiring root access. You will only be asked for the password
        > the
        > > first time, though. You can use 'sudo su' to switch to root and then not
        > > bother with sudo anymore (for that terminal session). You will get the
        > > traditional # to show you are root instead of the $ used in sudo.
        > >
        > > Let us know if the password problem continues. That can be fixed too.
        > >
        >
        > sudo su?
        >
        > Why not sudo -s?
        >
        > sudo su sounds too much like a Phil Collins song for my tastes.
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Paul
        ... To me su means switch user and sudo means switch user and do. It is rare I really want to switch my user. I usually just want the permissions in order to
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 26, 2012
          --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Roy <linuxcanuck@...> wrote:
          >
          > I guess it is easier to remember for Debian or Fedora users to use su than
          > -s because that is the terminal command in those environments. Both su an
          > -s will work. I recommend using whatever you can remember, but just be
          > consistent. Insisting on one way can lead to confusion in my experience. In
          > Fedora it is su - to make things more confusing. But in Debian it is just
          > su. I find telling people to use su is more consistent with the way it is
          > done by Debian. If one is coming from more of a Unix or BSD background then
          > sudo -s makes sense, but these people are rare. I blame Canonical for
          > mixing sudo into a Debian shell. ;) It confounded me for a long time and
          > now I struggle with su - in Fedora.
          >
          > Roy
          > Using Kubuntu 12.04, 64-bit
          > Location: Canada
          >
          >

          To me su means switch user and sudo means switch user and do. It is rare I really want to switch my user. I usually just want the permissions in order to do something so for me sudo seems to better describe what I want. When I install Debian I do not even get sudo by default. I have to explicitly install it, then configure it myself. I don't do a typical desktop install though. Far from it.

          Just to head off all the folks that want to cry I am wrong, they get it when they install, etc. To that I say that's nice. If anyone wishes to duplicate how I install pick expert install, then choose nothing, done.

          There are likely many things about my systems that are atypical. Years of practice ...
        • Roy
          I do that in Fedora, too. I use sudo and things are more consistent for me. Roy Using Kubuntu 12.04, 64-bit Location: Canada ... [Non-text portions of this
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 27, 2012
            I do that in Fedora, too. I use sudo and things are more consistent for me.

            Roy
            Using Kubuntu 12.04, 64-bit
            Location: Canada


            On 26 August 2012 20:37, Paul <pfrederick1@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Roy <linuxcanuck@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > I guess it is easier to remember for Debian or Fedora users to use su
            > than
            > > -s because that is the terminal command in those environments. Both su an
            > > -s will work. I recommend using whatever you can remember, but just be
            > > consistent. Insisting on one way can lead to confusion in my experience.
            > In
            > > Fedora it is su - to make things more confusing. But in Debian it is just
            > > su. I find telling people to use su is more consistent with the way it is
            > > done by Debian. If one is coming from more of a Unix or BSD background
            > then
            > > sudo -s makes sense, but these people are rare. I blame Canonical for
            > > mixing sudo into a Debian shell. ;) It confounded me for a long time and
            > > now I struggle with su - in Fedora.
            > >
            > > Roy
            > > Using Kubuntu 12.04, 64-bit
            > > Location: Canada
            > >
            > >
            >
            > To me su means switch user and sudo means switch user and do. It is rare I
            > really want to switch my user. I usually just want the permissions in order
            > to do something so for me sudo seems to better describe what I want. When I
            > install Debian I do not even get sudo by default. I have to explicitly
            > install it, then configure it myself. I don't do a typical desktop install
            > though. Far from it.
            >
            > Just to head off all the folks that want to cry I am wrong, they get it
            > when they install, etc. To that I say that's nice. If anyone wishes to
            > duplicate how I install pick expert install, then choose nothing, done.
            >
            > There are likely many things about my systems that are atypical. Years of
            > practice ...
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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