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  • Steve
    This may have addressed before, can you run linux program downloaded through windows? I haven t learned how to access the internet with my linux computer.
    Message 1 of 17 , May 16, 2011
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      This may have addressed before, can you run linux program downloaded through windows? I haven't learned how to access the internet with my linux computer. Can I download linux programs on my windows computer to use on my linux computer? Thanks stevestanfill
    • Scott
      ... Sure. Assuming you have a way to transfer the two, such as a USB stick. -- Scott Robbins PGP keyID EB3467D6 ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6
      Message 2 of 17 , May 16, 2011
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        On Mon, May 16, 2011 at 03:02:27PM -0000, Steve wrote:
        > This may have addressed before, can you run linux program downloaded through windows? I haven't learned how to access the internet with my linux computer. Can I download linux programs on my windows computer to use on my linux computer? Thanks stevestanfill
        >
        >

        Sure. Assuming you have a way to transfer the two, such as a USB stick.


        --
        Scott Robbins
        PGP keyID EB3467D6
        ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
        gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

        Xander: I don't get your crazy system!
        Giles: It's called the alphabet.
        Xander: Would ya look at that.
      • Steve
        I use usb thumb drives alot, when I download files from a broadband computer. I am really green on this.
        Message 3 of 17 , May 16, 2011
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          I use usb thumb drives alot, when I download files from a broadband computer. I am really green on this.
        • Steve
          ... Scott what are the letters and numbers after your name. Are they your address in linux or something to blow my mind.
          Message 4 of 17 , May 16, 2011
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            > Scott Robbins
            > PGP keyID EB3467D6
            > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
            > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

            Scott what are the letters and numbers after your name. Are they your address in linux or something to blow my mind.
          • loyal_barber
            ... Wow. What distro are you running that did not recognize your network adapter? We can help.with that too. many modern distros can safely mount and use
            Message 5 of 17 , May 16, 2011
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              --- In , "Steve" <.> wrote:
              >
              > This may have addressed before, can you run linux program downloaded through windows? I haven't learned how to access the internet with my linux computer. Can I download linux programs on my windows computer to use on my linux computer? Thanks stevestanfill
              >
              Wow. What distro are you running
              that did not recognize your network
              adapter? We can help.with that too.
              many modern distros can safely mount
              and use Windows file systems. You
              could burn a CD & linux can mount
              that too. Also, you could use a thumb
              drive. All of these methods will work
              but none are recommended as a way
              to get software. You really need your
              internet running so you can use the
              repositiries for your distro instead.

              Loyal
            • Hugo Azevedo
              No problem, Steve. You can do it. You can run Linux programs downloaded on a windows system. Although, after you transfer the file from Windows to Linux,
              Message 6 of 17 , May 17, 2011
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                No problem, Steve. You can do it. You can run Linux programs downloaded on a windows system.

                Although, after you transfer the file from Windows to Linux, execute permission is always set, even though the file is not executable (.gz, .txt, .odt, .pdf, .tar, .deb etc.). However, there is no problem in this transfer procedure from one system to another.


                Sincerely,Hugo Azevedo
                 Certificado / Certified: LPI-1, NCLA e NDCTS
                 www.hugoazevedo.eti.br
                 "Na caixa dizia: Requer Micro$oft Windows ou superior, então eu instalei o GNU/Linux!"
                 "On the box said: Requires Micro$oft Windows or better, so I installed the GNU/Linux!"
                 
                EVANGELHO - A- A+ — O Senhor esteja convosco.  — Ele está no meio de nós. — PROCLAMAÇÃO do Evangelho de Jesus Cristo + segundo Mateus. — Glória a vós, Senhor! Naquele tempo, disse Jesus aos seus discípulos: 7“Pedi e vos será dado! Procurai e achareis! Batei e a porta vos será aberta! 8Pois todo aquele que pede recebe; quem procura encontra; e a quem bate a porta será aberta. 9Quem de vós dá ao filho uma pedra, quando ele pede um pão? 10Ou lhe dá uma cobra, quando ele pede um peixe? 11Ora, se vós, que sois maus, sabeis dar coisas boas a vossos filhos, quanto mais vosso Pai que está nos céus dará coisas boas aos que lhe pedirem! 12Tudo quanto quereis que os outros vos façam, fazei também a eles. Nisto consiste a Lei e os Profetas”. - Palavra da Salvação. - Glória a vós, Senhor.

                --- Em seg, 16/5/11, Steve <sstevev@...> escreveu:

                De: Steve <sstevev@...>
                Assunto: [LINUX_Newbies] downloaded files
                Para: LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com
                Data: Segunda-feira, 16 de Maio de 2011, 12:02
















                 









                This may have addressed before, can you run linux program downloaded through windows? I haven't learned how to access the internet with my linux computer. Can I download linux programs on my windows computer to use on my linux computer? Thanks stevestanfill



























                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Steve
                - Wow. What distro are you running ... I think I need to find a source of reading material, so I can understand the terms and phrases. How do you know
                Message 7 of 17 , May 17, 2011
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                  -> Wow. What distro are you running
                  > that did not recognize your network
                  > adapter? We can help.with that too.
                  > many modern distros can safely mount
                  > and use Windows file systems. You
                  > could burn a CD & linux can mount
                  > that too. Also, you could use a thumb
                  > drive. All of these methods will work
                  > but none are recommended as a way
                  > to get software. You really need your
                  > internet running so you can use the
                  > repositiries for your distro instead.
                  >
                  > Loyal
                  >
                  I think I need to find a source of reading material, so I can understand the terms and phrases. How do you know where to find the distro I'm using.
                • Scott
                  ... Hash: SHA1 ... It s my pgp key. This is used if I want to verify that the email is from me. I don t use it on mailing lists because it just takes up
                  Message 8 of 17 , May 18, 2011
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                    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
                    Hash: SHA1

                    On Tue, May 17, 2011 at 04:47:09AM -0000, Steve wrote:
                    > > Scott Robbins
                    > > PGP keyID EB3467D6
                    > > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
                    > > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
                    >
                    > Scott what are the letters and numbers after your name. Are they your address in linux or something to blow my mind.
                    >
                    It's my pgp key. This is used if I want to verify that the email is
                    from me. I don't use it on mailing lists because it just takes up space
                    and confuses newcomers. I use it if I want to make sure that a
                    particular person can be sure the email is from me. It's also useful
                    for encrypting mail.

                    The final line (gpg --keyserver, etc.) tells someone how to get my pgp
                    key. I will sign this particular email inline, with apologies to the
                    list for space taking, just to show you what it is.
                    (I can also just sign--in this case, I'm doing it in line so that email
                    clients don't see it as an attachment.)


                    - --
                    Scott Robbins
                    PGP keyID EB3467D6
                    ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
                    gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

                    Willow: Why couldn't he be possessed by a puppy, or some
                    ducks?
                    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
                    Version: GnuPG v1.4.5 (GNU/Linux)

                    iD8DBQFN0/VJ+lTVdes0Z9YRAjP7AJ9AHadhCukEGXs9YOLaxdPO5GFhowCfa+Bw
                    IFUxqN0KdJWAHaZ30tRlm/w=
                    =uEpL
                    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
                  • Chris Becker
                    ... Steve, distro is short for Distribution and only referes to the name of the Linux operating system (OS) you are using and what version. For example
                    Message 9 of 17 , May 18, 2011
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                      On Tue, May 17, 2011 at 7:35 PM, Steve <sstevev@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > I think I need to find a source of reading material, so I can understand the terms and phrases. How do you know where to find the distro I'm using.
                      >

                      Steve,
                      "distro" is short for "Distribution" and only referes to the name of
                      the Linux operating system (OS) you are using and what version. For
                      example "Ubuntu 10.04"...

                      If you open a terminal and type the following

                      cat /etc/issue

                      It should report the OS and version. Also, you can determine your
                      version of Linux Kernel (which is the core of every linux OS) by
                      typing

                      uname -a

                      What can be handy for determining new linux terms and searching for
                      linux-specific information is by typing 'www.google.com/linux' into
                      your browser address bar. Then searching for what you are looking
                      for. For example, typing 'distro' into the search box
                      @.../linux returns the following as the second result:

                      --Linux distribution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
                      A Linux distribution is a member of the family of Unix-like operating
                      systems built on top of the Linux kernel. Such distributions (often
                      called distros for ...--

                      As another example, taking the question you asked and plugging it into
                      the google.com/linux search box (i.e., How do you know where to find
                      the distro I'm using) returns the following terminal command from the
                      first hit:
                      $ cat /etc/*-release
                      (you might be starting to realize, also, that there are often many
                      ways to acomplish the same thing in Linux, though each way typically
                      provides its own unique sets of extra information)

                      Note, I'm not at all trying to discourage you from asking questions.
                      Do ask away as that is what *I think* this list is for. Just trying
                      to share one of the things I have found most useful in resolving some
                      of my more complicated confusions. :) Even so, google answers can be
                      confusing and/or misleading at times.

                      Cheers, and hope that information helps ~Chris
                    • Steve
                      My distro is ubuntu.
                      Message 10 of 17 , May 18, 2011
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                        My distro is ubuntu.
                      • Steve
                        My wife and I just spent the weekend in Gatlinburg, TN. The hotel we stay at had wifi. My linux laptop logged on with out any problems. Now, I know, I can
                        Message 11 of 17 , May 24, 2011
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                          My wife and I just spent the weekend in Gatlinburg, TN. The hotel we stay at had wifi. My linux laptop logged on with out any problems. Now, I know, I can access the internet. My next chore is to find a place that has wifi. I only have dial-up and my provider doesn't service linux. It just gets better. Thanks, Steve.
                        • Paul
                          ... My ISP doesn t officially support Linux either that doesn t exactly slow me down though ...
                          Message 12 of 17 , May 24, 2011
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                            --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <sstevev@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > My wife and I just spent the weekend in Gatlinburg, TN. The hotel we stay at had wifi. My linux laptop logged on with out any problems. Now, I know, I can access the internet. My next chore is to find a place that has wifi. I only have dial-up and my provider doesn't service linux. It just gets better. Thanks, Steve.
                            >

                            My ISP doesn't officially support Linux either that doesn't exactly slow me down though ...
                          • david poston
                            If you can get the mac and other date from your provider, you may be able to configure ppp. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            Message 13 of 17 , May 24, 2011
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                              If you can get the mac and other date from your provider, you may be able to
                              configure ppp.



                              On Tue, May 24, 2011 at 12:44 PM, Steve <sstevev@...> wrote:

                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > My wife and I just spent the weekend in Gatlinburg, TN. The hotel we stay
                              > at had wifi. My linux laptop logged on with out any problems. Now, I know, I
                              > can access the internet. My next chore is to find a place that has wifi. I
                              > only have dial-up and my provider doesn't service linux. It just gets
                              > better. Thanks, Steve.
                              >
                              >
                              >


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • david
                              I was with one ISP and they told me they did not support Linux. I ask if they supported Forfire web broser. They said yes. I then told them they supported
                              Message 14 of 17 , May 27, 2011
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                                I was with one ISP and they told me they did not support Linux. I ask if they supported Forfire web broser. They said yes. I then told them they supported Linux. Come to find out, they didn't know if they supported Linux or not.

                                david

                                On Wed, 25 May 2011 01:07:28 -0000
                                "Paul" <pfrederick1@...> wrote:

                                >
                                >
                                > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <sstevev@...> wrote:
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > My wife and I just spent the weekend in Gatlinburg, TN. The hotel we stay at had wifi. My linux laptop logged on with out any problems. Now, I know, I can access the internet. My next chore is to find a place that has wifi. I only have dial-up and my provider doesn't service linux. It just gets better. Thanks, Steve.
                                > >
                                >
                                > My ISP doesn't officially support Linux either that doesn't exactly slow me down though ...
                                >


                                --
                                david <dvdposton@...>
                              • Robert C Wittig
                                ... Most ISP s do not *support* Linux. This means they do not have documents or a help desk, telling their subscribers how to use Linux operating systems on
                                Message 15 of 17 , May 27, 2011
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                                  On 5/27/2011 6:38 AM, david wrote:
                                  > I was with one ISP and they told me they did not support Linux. I ask
                                  > if they supported Forfire web broser. They said yes. I then told them
                                  > they supported Linux. Come to find out, they didn't know if they
                                  > supported Linux or not.
                                  >
                                  > david
                                  >

                                  Most ISP's do not *support* Linux. This means they do not have documents
                                  or a help desk, telling their subscribers how to use Linux operating
                                  systems on their ISP.

                                  It does not mean that Linux won't run on their ISP, it just means that
                                  Linux user are on their own, if they encounter a problem.

                                  When I first started running Linux and FreeBSD on my CompuServe account,
                                  I had to first log on (it was dial-up) running in DOS or Windows 3.11,
                                  then access the Linux Forum and read the instructions, how to configure
                                  a script that would send the correct responses to CompuServe's logon
                                  protocol.

                                  Now, Linux is quite advanced, and most people use ISP's that run DSL, so
                                  logging onto a modern Linux OS happens automatically, when you start the
                                  computer.


                                  --
                                  http://www.robertwittig.com/
                                  http://robertwittig.net/
                                  http://robertwittig.org/
                                  .
                                • david poston
                                  Sorry for my spelling of Firefox. You are right about the ISP not having docs for Linux. But I had ask for the mac and IP addresses and told them some one can
                                  Message 16 of 17 , May 27, 2011
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                                    Sorry for my spelling of Firefox. You are right about the ISP not having
                                    docs' for Linux. But I had ask for the mac and IP addresses and told them
                                    some one can get on with ppp if it was set right. I than told them they may
                                    want to get up to date with Linux cause it was going to be hot. Well, look
                                    at it now.

                                    david

                                    On Fri, May 27, 2011 at 8:24 AM, Robert C Wittig <
                                    wittig.robert@...> wrote:

                                    >
                                    >
                                    > On 5/27/2011 6:38 AM, david wrote:
                                    > > I was with one ISP and they told me they did not support Linux. I ask
                                    > > if they supported Forfire web broser. They said yes. I then told them
                                    > > they supported Linux. Come to find out, they didn't know if they
                                    > > supported Linux or not.
                                    > >
                                    > > david
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    > Most ISP's do not *support* Linux. This means they do not have documents
                                    > or a help desk, telling their subscribers how to use Linux operating
                                    > systems on their ISP.
                                    >
                                    > It does not mean that Linux won't run on their ISP, it just means that
                                    > Linux user are on their own, if they encounter a problem.
                                    >
                                    > When I first started running Linux and FreeBSD on my CompuServe account,
                                    > I had to first log on (it was dial-up) running in DOS or Windows 3.11,
                                    > then access the Linux Forum and read the instructions, how to configure
                                    > a script that would send the correct responses to CompuServe's logon
                                    > protocol.
                                    >
                                    > Now, Linux is quite advanced, and most people use ISP's that run DSL, so
                                    > logging onto a modern Linux OS happens automatically, when you start the
                                    > computer.
                                    >
                                    > --
                                    > http://www.robertwittig.com/
                                    > http://robertwittig.net/
                                    > http://robertwittig.org/
                                    > .
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Paul
                                    ... Yeah just dropping an Ubuntu live CD into a drive should tell one soon enough just how hard it is to setup Internet with an ISP.
                                    Message 17 of 17 , May 28, 2011
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                                      --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Robert C Wittig <wittig.robert@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > logging onto a modern Linux OS happens automatically, when you start the
                                      > computer.


                                      Yeah just dropping an Ubuntu live CD into a drive should tell one soon enough just how hard it is to setup Internet with an ISP.
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