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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Please bear with a newbie w/some questions

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  • Roy
    I could not get Maverick to run in a VM either, so it isn t just Fedora. I would add that Wubi is also available from wubi-installer.org. It was once a
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 1, 2010
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      I could not get Maverick to run in a VM either, so it isn't just Fedora.

      I would add that Wubi is also available from wubi-installer.org. It was once
      a separate project, but has since been rolled into the*buntus. Some other
      distributions have something similar. Wubi Ubuntu will NOT work inside
      Windows. It installs inside Windows then you need to re-boot to use it. The
      directory where it is installed is an image that is mounted as if it was a
      partition when you re-boot. The installation continues for a several minutes
      after you re-boot and then it will work as the normal thing with a couple of
      exceptions. Hibernation will not work. It is open to Windows problems such
      as a corrupted file system from viruses and crashes and fragmentation.It is
      cool and unique to Linux and every Ubuntu (and variants) user should try it
      once because it is something that you can recommend to people wanting to try
      without the worry of losing Windows data. It is high on the cool factor,
      IMO.

      Roy

      Using Kubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat


      On 30 September 2010 22:31, Scott <scottro@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > On Thu, Sep 30, 2010 at 11:04:51AM -0400, Septymus Spyder wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello all,
      > >
      > > The information below is only my opinion.
      > >
      > > 1. Download and burn ISO copies of Linux versions that allow you to run
      > off CD.
      > >
      > > This trend was started (I believe) by Knoppix, the original Live CD.
      > Essentially what you can do is run everything off CD, without impacting your
      > hardware in any way.
      > >
      >
      > I think you're right about Knoppix, but regardless, the vast majority of
      > distributions do have a live CD.
      >
      >
      > > 3. Use virtualization software such as VMWare or VirtualBox
      > >
      > On occasion, such as the current Fedora Beta, it won't run in VirtualBox
      > though it may run fine if actually installed. (At least, several
      > people have reported this to be the case, it's been my own experience,
      > and on the testing list one of the main QA people mentioned that it
      > hadn't been tested.)
      >
      > I also couldn't get it to run in VMware-player or KVM-qemu, though
      > others have gotten said beta to run in qemu. I just mention this, as
      > sometimes, one might find that using virtualization doesn't give an
      > accurate picture. It may be that the Ubuntu based distributions pay
      > more attention to whether or not it works in VBox.
      >
      > > Either VMWare or VirtualBox allow you to use your operating systems
      > simultaneously, while Wubi requires that you boot into the operating system
      > of choice and use it exclusively.
      > >
      > See above--in most cases that's quite correct, but it may not be.
      >
      > --
      > Scott Robbins
      > PGP keyID EB3467D6
      > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
      > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
      >
      > Buffy: You know, for someone who teaches human behavior, you
      > might try showing some.
      > Professor Walsh:It's not my job to coddle my students.
      > Buffy: You're right. A human being in pain has nothing to do with
      > your job. (leaves)
      > Professor Walsh: I like her.
      > Riley: Really? You don't think she's a little peculiar?
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • J
      ... That s odd... I just got done doing about 30 different Maverick installs in VBox VMs. If you re running KVM, that could be the issue. KVM is, IMO crap...
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 1, 2010
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        On Fri, Oct 1, 2010 at 07:56, Roy <linuxcanuck@...> wrote:
        > I could not get Maverick to run in a VM either, so it isn't just Fedora.

        That's odd... I just got done doing about 30 different Maverick
        installs in VBox VMs.
        If you're running KVM, that could be the issue. KVM is, IMO crap...
        sadly, it's been, for me, as unstable as Xen was/is.

        But in my own experience at least, I've had no issues running Maverick
        or any other Ubuntu in VirtualBox VMs, and that includes both 32 and
        64bit VMs.

        > I would add that Wubi is also available from wubi-installer.org. It was once
        > a separate project, but has since been rolled into the*buntus. Some other
        > distributions have something similar. Wubi Ubuntu will NOT work inside
        > Windows. It installs inside Windows then you need to re-boot to use it. The
        > directory where it is installed is an image that is mounted as if it was a
        > partition when you re-boot. The installation continues for a several minutes
        > after you re-boot and then it will work as the normal thing with a couple of
        > exceptions. Hibernation will not work. It is open to Windows problems such
        > as a corrupted file system from viruses and crashes and fragmentation.It is
        > cool and unique to Linux and every Ubuntu  (and variants) user should try it
        > once because it is something that you can recommend to people wanting to try
        > without the worry of losing Windows data. It is high on the cool factor,
        > IMO.

        Wubi is cool, but it's certainly not a new idea. Red Hat was doing
        that way back in the day, and TBH, it was one of the things that drove
        me insane... it wasn't called Wubi (some other tool, but the effect
        was the same. Installed into a file on the windows filesystem
        (similar to the files used by virtual machines for their filesystems),
        added an option to boot and off you went.

        This time around, I could not get a wubi based 32bit Maverick install
        to boot on my WinXP partition (on my Lenovo S-10 netbook) but I did
        get it to work just fine on my Athlon II system running 64bit Windows
        7.

        I agree with yo though, Wubi is a cool way for users to try out Linux
        without refactoring their partition schemes, and risking the loss of
        data that can occur when you start resizing filesystems and
        partitions.

        Cheers
        Jeff
      • Roy
        It is peculiar to 64-bit AMD machines I think in early releases only. It was corrected I think after alpha, but by then I had given up and installed to a HD.
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 1, 2010
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          It is peculiar to 64-bit AMD machines I think in early releases only. It was
          corrected I think after alpha, but by then I had given up and installed to a
          HD. Now, I am a bit gun shy of testing Ubuntu in a VM. That is okay because
          I have a partition set aside for this, but at the time I was running Fedora
          13 on my developmental partition. I thought that I could get away with
          testing Ubuntu in the VM, but had no luck. The installation would stall
          everytime. I downloaded several images of both Ubuntu and Kubuntu then read
          somewhere that it was a known bug.

          Roy

          On 1 October 2010 13:18, J <dreadpiratejeff@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > On Fri, Oct 1, 2010 at 07:56, Roy <linuxcanuck@...<linuxcanuck%40gmail.com>>
          > wrote:
          > > I could not get Maverick to run in a VM either, so it isn't just Fedora.
          >
          > That's odd... I just got done doing about 30 different Maverick
          > installs in VBox VMs.
          > If you're running KVM, that could be the issue. KVM is, IMO crap...
          > sadly, it's been, for me, as unstable as Xen was/is.
          >
          > But in my own experience at least, I've had no issues running Maverick
          > or any other Ubuntu in VirtualBox VMs, and that includes both 32 and
          > 64bit VMs.
          >
          >
          > > I would add that Wubi is also available from wubi-installer.org. It was
          > once
          > > a separate project, but has since been rolled into the*buntus. Some other
          > > distributions have something similar. Wubi Ubuntu will NOT work inside
          > > Windows. It installs inside Windows then you need to re-boot to use it.
          > The
          > > directory where it is installed is an image that is mounted as if it was
          > a
          > > partition when you re-boot. The installation continues for a several
          > minutes
          > > after you re-boot and then it will work as the normal thing with a couple
          > of
          > > exceptions. Hibernation will not work. It is open to Windows problems
          > such
          > > as a corrupted file system from viruses and crashes and fragmentation.It
          > is
          > > cool and unique to Linux and every Ubuntu (and variants) user should try
          > it
          > > once because it is something that you can recommend to people wanting to
          > try
          > > without the worry of losing Windows data. It is high on the cool factor,
          > > IMO.
          >
          > Wubi is cool, but it's certainly not a new idea. Red Hat was doing
          > that way back in the day, and TBH, it was one of the things that drove
          > me insane... it wasn't called Wubi (some other tool, but the effect
          > was the same. Installed into a file on the windows filesystem
          > (similar to the files used by virtual machines for their filesystems),
          > added an option to boot and off you went.
          >
          > This time around, I could not get a wubi based 32bit Maverick install
          > to boot on my WinXP partition (on my Lenovo S-10 netbook) but I did
          > get it to work just fine on my Athlon II system running 64bit Windows
          > 7.
          >
          > I agree with yo though, Wubi is a cool way for users to try out Linux
          > without refactoring their partition schemes, and risking the loss of
          > data that can occur when you start resizing filesystems and
          > partitions.
          >
          > Cheers
          > Jeff
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Darksyde
          ... Sounds like the perfect advice for a newb, Spyder, though I ve never run Wubi, hardly ever heard about it, but I think I ll check it out. I m having some
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 6, 2010
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            --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Septymus Spyder <septymus.spyder@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hello all,
            >
            > The information below is only my opinion.
            >
            > When trying to figure out the best way to test Linux, there are a number of options available to you. These are the ones that come to mind for me, but if anyone knows other means to try it, feel free to pass on the information.
            >
            > 1. Download and burn ISO copies of Linux versions that allow you to run off CD.
            >
            > This trend was started (I believe) by Knoppix, the original Live CD. Essentially what you can do is run everything off CD, without impacting your hardware in any way.
            >
            > 2. Run Wubi
            >
            > If you are currently running Windows on the machine, you can download and install a copy of Ubuntu or Kubuntu that runs as an application in Windows. It's called Wubi, and allows you to select multiple versions to install. It creates a folder on the hard drive with the data stored there, so there's no permanent damage to your hard drive. You can get the download at http://www.ubuntu.com/
            >
            > Basically, Wubi sets up a separate installation of Linux on the hard drive, but doesn't permanently modify your master boot record (used to start the operating system on the disk). You can choose to boot either Windows or Ubuntu when you start your computer.
            >
            > 3. Use virtualization software such as VMWare or VirtualBox
            >
            > Additionally, you can use software such as VMWare (http://www.vmware.com/) to create virtual installations of Linux that run as applications inside Windows. This allows you to use both operating systems at the same time, with one acting as a virtual computer. You'll need to download previously created versions of the Linux distribution you wish to use, as the VMWare Player (I think) doesn't allow you to create new installations. If I'm wrong on that, though, please let me know.
            >
            > If you want to play with multiple versions of Linux/UNIX and want to install them yourself, your best bet is to use a program called VirtualBox. It can be downloaded at http://www.virtualbox.org/
            >
            > VirtualBox only requires the ISO version of the operating system you wish to install, so there's no need to burn CDs unless you want to keep a copy.
            >
            > Either VMWare or VirtualBox allow you to use your operating systems simultaneously, while Wubi requires that you boot into the operating system of choice and use it exclusively.
            >
            > Ultimately, you'll need to make a decision based on which method you prefer.
            >
            > Hope this information helps all and sundry.
            >
            > Septymus Spyder
            >
            Sounds like the perfect advice for a newb, Spyder, though I've never run Wubi, hardly ever heard about it, but I think I'll check it out. I'm having some probs with my primary computer which I'll refer to in another post but does Wubi act essentially as a duel-boot system? Never mind, I'll RTFWebpage. lol
            Mark
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