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re: external hard drive

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  • David Neeley
    Rixta, If you wish, feel free to email me off list with any choices you may be presented by the shop. I ve had about thirty years of experience with hardware
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 7, 2010
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      Rixta,

      If you wish, feel free to email me off list with any choices you may
      be presented by the shop. I've had about thirty years of experience
      with hardware issues, and did quite a bit of consulting on the subject
      before I retired and moved to Ukraine. I'd be happy to make some
      recommendations--but I would not at all take it personally if you
      should disagree with any of them! 8:)

      My email is dbneeley (at) gmail (dot) com

      As for drivers, I really doubt you'll have much of an issue with them.
      The messiest is probably video support, and even that is often not a
      problem with most of the major vendors' product. Most of the major
      distributions come with support for nearly all the devices you are
      likely to run into.

      Personally, I would suggest if it's practical to do so to set up
      several of the potential distribution choices in advance on CD or USB
      drives, so once you have the machine in front of you, you'll have a
      choice to check out before you make any longer-term decisions. I
      happen to like using USB thumb drives for this purpose, and I mostly
      use unetbootin to prepare them. There's a version for Windows
      machines, and you can either use an ISO image of a live CD version you
      may already have or be given, or unetbootin will download the image
      and install it for you if you wish. That is at
      <http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net>

      Another method might be to have the shop install a version of Linux
      for you, which you can then use to experiment with and determine if
      you are happy with the distribution loaded or if you want to try
      others.

      According to what I see on the Net, the hardware available in Oz is
      much the same as we have here in Ukraine or that is available in the
      U.S., although I suspect that like here the pricing is a little higher
      than in the U.S.

      Right now, the last generation of CPUs--the Core 2 stuff--is still
      around and may be cheaper than the current i3, i5, and i7 series
      devices. Even there, though, there are some that are far more capable
      than others.

      By the way, will you be replacing your monitor as well, or using one
      yu have now? The newer monitors are often much higher resolution than
      ones that are a few years old--so even if you're to be using an older
      one at first, you should be sure your new machine will easily support
      the newer, more complex displays. Primarily, this means having
      adequate memory on the video card if it has a separate card. It
      sounds, though, as if a motherboard with a decent on-board video
      device may be more than adequate for what you want, and would save you
      a fair amount of money as well. You could always add a separate video
      card later should that prove desirable.

      David



      --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Rixta Francis" <rixta.francis@...> wrote:
      >
      > I do intend to get my own computer built, at the shop around the corner. I had already planned to get that done six months ago, but health issues postponed things. I will only get Linux on it, saving about $200 for a Windows version I don't want and don't need. I have asked at the shop what a good, basic computer will cost and it's about AUS$500-600, which is really good compared to what you pay at other places. I don't need the top of the top, a basic computer will do for me. My current computer is about eight years old and even with some upgrades it's really out of date, but good enough for me. Just getting too slow.
      > Once I get the new one I will just have to start searching for lots of Linux drivers, but I'm sure I can find most of them on special Linux websites. By then I will post lots of messages here with "Help, where can I find this?" LOL
    • loyal_barber
      ... Boy have I got good news for you! In Linux, you don t have to go around searching for drivers! This ain t windoze! In Linux we do things a bit
      Message 2 of 13 , Apr 8, 2010
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        --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Rixta Francis" <rixta.francis@...> wrote:
        >
        > I do intend to get my own computer built, at the shop around the corner. I had already planned to get that done six months ago, but health issues postponed things. I will only get Linux on it, saving about $200 for a Windows version I don't want and don't need. I have asked at the shop what a good, basic computer will cost and it's about AUS$500-600, which is really good compared to what you pay at other places. I don't need the top of the top, a basic computer will do for me. My current computer is about eight years old and even with some upgrades it's really out of date, but good enough for me. Just getting too slow.

        > Once I get the new one I will just have to start searching for lots of Linux drivers, but I'm sure I can find most of them on special Linux websites. By then I will post lots of messages here with "Help, where can I find this?" LOL
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Rixta
        >
        > <snip>

        Boy have I got good news for you! In Linux, you don't have to go
        around searching for drivers! This ain't windoze! In Linux we do
        things a bit different. For example, if you go with Ubuntu or
        Linux Mint (my favourite) you will find that when you install one
        of these, all of your devices will just work. Let your local shop
        know that you intend to put Linux on the system and they will stay
        away from anything that won't work, but those hardware pieces are
        pretty rare or really old.

        I was reminded of this issue yesterday when I had to put Windoze
        back on my laptop along with Linux Mint. I spent several hours
        finding all of the drivers for Windoze. I installed Mint and two
        things happened: 1. It found all of the drivers I needed and 2. It
        suggested a couple of drivers for my wireless and video that are
        free, but proprietary. Since I had a wired connection to the
        Interweb, everything including these drivers were found and installed
        for me.

        Loyal
      • J
        ... Caveat: this applies to probably 95% of hardware... there are a couple cases here and there where you may have issues... though as Loyal implies, these
        Message 3 of 13 , Apr 8, 2010
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          On Thu, Apr 8, 2010 at 14:01, loyal_barber <loyal_barber@...> wrote:

          > Boy have I got good news for you!  In Linux, you don't have to go
          > around searching for drivers!  This ain't windoze!  In Linux we do
          > things a bit different.  For example, if you go with Ubuntu or
          > Linux Mint (my favourite) you will find that when you install one
          > of these, all of your devices will just work.  Let your local shop
          > know that you intend to put Linux on the system and they will stay
          > away from anything that won't work, but those hardware pieces are
          > pretty rare or really old.

          Caveat: this applies to probably 95% of hardware... there are a couple
          cases here and there where you may have issues... though as Loyal
          implies, these issues are quickly becoming a memory...

          For example, in Ubuntu 9.10, you had to do some restricted driver
          installs to get some Broadcom wireless cards working. Lucid (10.04
          coming soon) does a better job of taking care of this problem for you
          though...

          So yeah, I'll +1 what Loyal says... AND to add another bit of icing,
          Linux runs amazingly well on older hardware too, though feature creep
          is causing modern Linux systems to require more and more resources by
          default (for example, there aren't many distros out there that are
          current AND will run on a system with < 256MB of ram...)

          So that's something to keep in mind. Linux is equally great for
          cheap, used computers and for shiny new ones.

          Cheers,

          Jeff
        • Rixta Francis
          I obviously still have a lot to learn, but that goes for everything new. And I m a pretty quick learner, so I m not worried about it. The main problem will
          Message 4 of 13 , Apr 8, 2010
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            I obviously still have a lot to learn, but that goes for everything new. And I'm a pretty quick learner, so I'm not worried about it. The main problem will probably be to get my mind off Windows and focused on Linux. After 12 years with Windows that will be quite a change. But it will be a nice change. I'm a bit tired of Windows. And if I don't know something I have you guys to help me.:-)
            And yes, I will ask the guy who put the computer together for me to also install my preferred distro of Linux and to transfer all my files. No reason to do that myself if someone else can do it for me.:-)

            Cheers,
            Rixta




            Boy have I got good news for you! In Linux, you don't have to go
            around searching for drivers! This ain't windoze! In Linux we do
            things a bit different. For example, if you go with Ubuntu or
            Linux Mint (my favourite) you will find that when you install one
            of these, all of your devices will just work. Let your local shop
            know that you intend to put Linux on the system and they will stay
            away from anything that won't work, but those hardware pieces are
            pretty rare or really old.

            I was reminded of this issue yesterday when I had to put Windoze
            back on my laptop along with Linux Mint. I spent several hours
            finding all of the drivers for Windoze. I installed Mint and two
            things happened: 1. It found all of the drivers I needed and 2. It
            suggested a couple of drivers for my wireless and video that are
            free, but proprietary. Since I had a wired connection to the
            Interweb, everything including these drivers were found and installed
            for me.

            Loyal



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