Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Mint 8 + Network = Oops...

Expand Messages
  • lexie
    Months ago I tried rescuing old IBM r30 from a trash heap by installing Linux (Moon OS 3). At first, there was only 128mb ram so full ubuntu or mint was no
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 28 10:20 PM
      Months ago I tried rescuing old IBM r30 from a trash heap by installing Linux (Moon OS 3). At first, there was only 128mb ram so full ubuntu or mint was no option. I mostly use it as file/print server and it worked until recently. After one update the IBM didn't "see" other computers on my network anymore, but it really wasn't necessary because the others could still "see" the printer and files on my external drive hooked up to it.

      My dad found some cheap memory on eBay and we upgraded it to 512mb, and like a week ago (don't ask why :p), I decided to install mint 8 on it. In Moon OS, I just shared the top level directory and applied all the settings and stuff to all the folders. That didn't work in mint, so I stopped being lazy and shared each individual folder but only 1 folder worked. I googled a few things but the suggestions were from older versions and I didn't know if I should try it.

      My printer doesn't network right either. When I try printing, it seem like it tries to send it to the printer but after a minute or 2, I get an error.

      any ideas? thx
    • loyal_barber
      ... First, instructions for old versions of Mint should work fine. It has not changed enough since version 5 to make those suggestions obsolete. When you say
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 29 4:51 PM
        --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "lexie" <oxolexiexox@...> wrote:
        >
        > Months ago I tried rescuing old IBM r30 from a trash heap by installing Linux (Moon OS 3). At first, there was only 128mb ram so full ubuntu or mint was no option. I mostly use it as file/print server and it worked until recently. After one update the IBM didn't "see" other computers on my network anymore, but it really wasn't necessary because the others could still "see" the printer and files on my external drive hooked up to it.
        >
        > My dad found some cheap memory on eBay and we upgraded it to 512mb, and like a week ago (don't ask why :p), I decided to install mint 8 on it. In Moon OS, I just shared the top level directory and applied all the settings and stuff to all the folders. That didn't work in mint, so I stopped being lazy and shared each individual folder but only 1 folder worked. I googled a few things but the suggestions were from older versions and I didn't know if I should try it.
        >
        > My printer doesn't network right either. When I try printing, it seem like it tries to send it to the printer but after a minute or 2, I get an error.
        >
        > any ideas? thx
        >


        First, instructions for old versions of Mint should work fine. It has
        not changed enough since version 5 to make those suggestions obsolete.
        When you say you shared a bunch of folders, do you mean via Samba?
        If so, I think by default Samba is set up for user level security.
        If you don't have it, install this application:

        system-config-samba

        This will create a menu item for Samba configuration under the
        Administrator's menu. Once you have that application installed, run
        it. Under preferences, change the workgroup to your MS workgroup
        name. Next go to Preferences->Samba users. Set up one or more
        Samba users with passwords. Next, go through your list of shares
        and make sure the users can access each share you want it to.

        As far as printers go to http://localhost:631. You should be able
        to set up sharing there.

        Loyal
      • J
        ... Indeed. at least the defaults for most shared storage is that way (though the default config file has example entries for anyone access folders as
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 29 6:43 PM
          On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 19:51, loyal_barber <loyal_barber@...> wrote:
          > First, instructions for old versions of Mint should work fine.  It has
          > not changed enough since version 5 to make those suggestions obsolete.
          > When you say you shared a bunch of folders, do you mean via Samba?
          > If so, I think by default Samba is set up for user level security.

          Indeed. at least the defaults for most shared storage is that way
          (though the default config file has example entries for "anyone
          access" folders as well). Printers, I believe, however, are
          accessible by anyone that can see the server by default.

          > If you don't have it, install this application:
          >
          > system-config-samba

          Now that I know what Mint is, is there a system-config-* toolset for
          Ubuntu? As far as I knew, that was a Fedora/Red Hat creation, so
          getting an installable for Ubuntu may be ... fun... unless there is
          one. Honestly, I've never looked for my Ubuntu based systems since I
          do all that stuff via the only config tool you need: vi ;-)

          However, samba-swat is a good web-accessible GUI tool for SMB
          config... though honestly, with a little learning curve, the default
          SMB config (at least the one that came with most SuSE and Red
          Hat/Fedora systems) was pretty well documented, at least for basic to
          moderate configs. The more advanced/obscure configs require a bit of
          knowledge though...

          Cheers
          Jeff


          --

          Mike Ditka - "If God had wanted man to play soccer, he wouldn't have
          given us arms." -
          http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/m/mike_ditka.html
        • Scott
          ... Yeah, I was surprised to read that too. ... I ve never been a big swat fan. So often, GUIs get in the way--I see that all the time on Fedora forums,
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 29 7:03 PM
            On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 09:43:41PM -0500, J wrote:
            > On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 19:51, loyal_barber <loyal_barber@...> wrote:
            >
            > Now that I know what Mint is, is there a system-config-* toolset for
            > Ubuntu? As far as I knew, that was a Fedora/Red Hat creation, so
            > getting an installable for Ubuntu may be ... fun... unless there is
            > one. Honestly, I've never looked for my Ubuntu based systems since I
            > do all that stuff via the only config tool you need: vi ;-)

            Yeah, I was surprised to read that too.

            >
            > However, samba-swat is a good web-accessible GUI tool for SMB
            > config... though honestly, with a little learning curve, the default
            > SMB config (at least the one that came with most SuSE and Red
            > Hat/Fedora systems) was pretty well documented, at least for basic to
            > moderate configs. The more advanced/obscure configs require a bit of
            > knowledge though...

            I've never been a big swat fan. So often, GUIs get in the way--I see
            that all the time on Fedora forums, noticing all the issues people have
            that I don't have, because I've come to prefer command line
            tools. For me, the fun part of Linux, and the thing that actually
            brought me there (I started my career as an MCSE), was working with the
            text files.

            It's not that hard. I have a (VERY dated) article on Samba, that might
            even have a few relevant points, at
            http://home.roadrunner.com/~computertaijutsu/samba.html

            Of course, what's hard is what you don't feel like doing. I always
            start saying bad words to myself when working with printers, but find it
            fun to google for an hour to find the one line I have to put in my mutt
            configuration file to do something new.

            --
            Scott Robbins
            PGP keyID EB3467D6
            ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
            gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

            Xander: The band, yeah. They're great. They march.
            Willow: Like an army. Except with music, instead of bullets, and
            usually no one dies.
          • J
            ... Yeah, me either, but I do suggest it from time to time. It usually DOES make things easier, and when it comes to GUI tools, I do prefer single purpose
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 29 7:15 PM
              On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 22:03, Scott <scottro@...> wrote:
              > I've never been a big swat fan.  So often, GUIs get in the way--I see
              > that all the time on Fedora forums, noticing all the issues people have
              > that I don't have, because I've come to prefer command line
              > tools.  For me, the fun part of Linux, and the thing that actually
              > brought me there (I started my career as an MCSE), was working with the
              > text files.

              Yeah, me either, but I do suggest it from time to time. It usually
              DOES make things easier, and when it comes to GUI tools, I do prefer
              single purpose ones to multi purpose ones... like Linuxconf.

              For those of you who aren't old enough to remember those days (grin)
              Linuxconf was a "Do-it-all configuration tool" and was really the
              first attempt at a GUI tool to do complete system configuration. The
              real big problem with it though, was that when you ran it, and saved
              your changes, it re-wrote EVERYTHING.

              So for example, you open it up to configure Samba (just saying that
              since it's germane to this thread). You make some config changes and
              then save/exit. Instead of just writing changes to smb.conf, it would
              re-write EVERY config file it touched, which very often led to things
              like, changing your network settings only to find that your printer no
              longer worked, or changing some small config to find EVERY other
              config was now reset to defaults :-) Oh those were the days... when I
              was doing tech support, the first software related question I ever
              asked when something config-wise came up was "Did you use Linuxconf?"

              Invariably, the answer was yes, and the first reply was "Delete it
              NOW!" and lets start over...

              > It's not that hard.  I have a (VERY dated) article on Samba, that might
              > even have a few relevant points, at http://home.roadrunner.com/~computertaijutsu/samba.html

              Dated though it may be, your how-tos are usually pretty good.

              > Of course, what's hard is what you don't feel like doing. I always
              > start saying bad words to myself when working with printers, but find it
              > fun to google for an hour to find the one line I have to put in my mutt
              > configuration file to do something new.

              Admittedly, the only time I used SWAT was when I was feeling
              particularly lazy and wanted a quick point and click fix instead of
              typing and actually looking at what I was doing to config a samba
              server that I needed to do some specific things... but I got over that
              quickly and came back to the light side... I don't even use GUIs to
              configure test machines at work, just a few config scripts I wrote to
              do common tasks that i can run off a USB drive that has all my test
              tools and scripts on it.

              > Xander: The band, yeah. They're great. They march.
              > Willow: Like an army. Except with music, instead of bullets, and
              > usually no one dies.

              The only band is Nerf Herder (and only a Buffy fan would get that)


              --

              Samuel Goldwyn - "I don't think anyone should write their
              autobiography until after they're dead." -
              http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/s/samuel_goldwyn.html
            • Scott
              ... ROTFLMAO. Did that ever work for you? I remember buying--yes, buying, Mandrake, and going through their book on it. ... Ah, that answers that question.
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 29 8:07 PM
                On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 10:15:32PM -0500, J wrote:
                > On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 22:03, Scott <scottro@...> wrote:
                > >  For me, the fun part of Linux, and the thing that actually
                > > brought me there (I started my career as an MCSE), was working with the
                > > text files.
                >
                > Yeah, me either, but I do suggest it from time to time. It usually
                > DOES make things easier, and when it comes to GUI tools, I do prefer
                > single purpose ones to multi purpose ones... like Linuxconf.

                ROTFLMAO. Did that ever work for you? I remember buying--yes, buying,
                Mandrake, and going through their book on it.

                >
                > asked when something config-wise came up was "Did you use Linuxconf?"
                >
                > Invariably, the answer was yes, and the first reply was "Delete it
                > NOW!" and lets start over...

                Ah, that answers that question.


                >
                > > It's not that hard.  I have a (VERY dated) article on Samba, that might
                > > even have a few relevant points, at http://home.roadrunner.com/~computertaijutsu/samba.html
                >
                > Dated though it may be, your how-tos are usually pretty good.
                >
                > > Of course, what's hard is what you don't feel like doing. I always
                > > start saying bad words to myself when working with printers, but find it
                > > fun to google for an hour to find the one line I have to put in my mutt
                > > configuration file to do something new.
                >
                > Admittedly, the only time I used SWAT was when I was feeling
                > particularly lazy and wanted a quick point and click fix instead of
                > typing and actually looking at what I was doing to config a samba
                > server that I needed to do some specific things... but I got over that
                > quickly and came back to the light side... I don't even use GUIs to
                > configure test machines at work, just a few config scripts I wrote to
                > do common tasks that i can run off a USB drive that has all my test
                > tools and scripts on it.

                I played with webmin--in my case, I didn't feel like doing a dhcp.conf
                file--freaken' semicolons.


                >
                > > Xander: The band, yeah. They're great. They march.
                > > Willow: Like an army. Except with music, instead of bullets, and
                > > usually no one dies.
                >
                > The only band is Nerf Herder (and only a Buffy fan would get that)

                Ah, memories. Now I have the song stuck in my head. With some youtube
                clips of folks putting the song to Harry Potter scenes.


                --
                Scott Robbins
                PGP keyID EB3467D6
                ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
                gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

                Buffy: What should we do with the trio over here? Should we burn
                them?
                Willow: I brought marshmallows.
              • grantrocket2
                I am running mint 8 on a old computer. I put a wireless network card in it in the hopes that mint would be able to take the internet from my sprint mobil
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 9, 2010
                  I am running mint 8 on a old computer. I put a wireless network card in it in the hopes that mint would be able to take the internet from my sprint mobil broadband card and broadcast it so more than one computer can be online. Only thing is, i can't get it to work. The wireless card works, and the sprint card works and connects to the internet. How can i get the internet to be shared over the network. I also wish to share the hardrive as a network drive. I will be connecting windows laptops and my linux laptop as well. Thanks in advance.
                • J
                  ... Need more info. How do you know your wireless card works? Can it ping and connect to other machines on your network? Is the problem only that you can t
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 9, 2010
                    On Sat, Jan 9, 2010 at 17:08, grantrocket2 <mars_rover@...> wrote:
                    > I am running mint 8 on a old computer. I put a wireless network card in it in the hopes that
                    > mint would be able to take the internet from my sprint mobil broadband card and broadcast
                    > it so more than one computer can be online. Only thing is, i can't get it to work. The
                    > wireless card works, and the sprint card works and connects to the internet. How can i get
                    > the internet to be shared over the network. I also wish to share the hardrive as a network
                    > drive. I will be connecting windows laptops and my linux laptop as well. Thanks in advance.

                    Need more info. How do you know your wireless card works? Can it
                    ping and connect to other machines on your network? Is the problem
                    only that you can't get out onto the internet? What's your network
                    setup? Are you using an off the shell router? Are you using a system
                    as a firewall/router? Are you using a NAT setup? There are quite a
                    few variables to "Why doesn't my computer get on the internet?"

                    As for the other thing... do some research in configuring NFS and
                    Samba. NFS is the *nix protocol for remote mounting filesystems.
                    Samba is the Linux version of the Windows protocol and lets your
                    Windows systems mount disks on a Linux machine, as well as doing
                    printer sharing and so forth.

                    So look those up, see how far you get, and come for help when/if you
                    get stuck :-)

                    Cheers
                    Jeff
                    --

                    Joan Crawford - "I, Joan Crawford, I believe in the dollar.
                    Everything I earn, I spend." -
                    http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/joan_crawford.html
                  • Todd
                    Wireless LAN Access Point Controller Chillispot and on my network got a old 4gb HDD ATA hooked to an WINDOZE machine via usb. I got network drive without
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 9, 2010
                      Wireless LAN Access Point Controller Chillispot and on my network got a old
                      4gb HDD ATA hooked to an WINDOZE machine via usb. I got network drive
                      without using NFS.


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • TODD
                      ... ChilliSpot is an open source captive portal or wireless LAN access point controller. It supports web based login which is today s standard for public
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 9, 2010
                        --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, J <dreadpiratejeff@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > On Sat, Jan 9, 2010 at 17:08, grantrocket2 <mars_rover@...> wrote:
                        > > I am running mint 8 on a old computer. I put a wireless network card in it in the hopes that
                        > > mint would be able to take the internet from my sprint mobil broadband card and broadcast
                        > > it so more than one computer can be online. Only thing is, i can't get it to work. The
                        > > wireless card works, and the sprint card works and connects to the internet. How can i get
                        > > the internet to be shared over the network. I also wish to share the hardrive as a network
                        > > drive. I will be connecting windows laptops and my linux laptop as well. Thanks in advance.
                        > ~~~Wireless LAN Access Point Controller

                        ChilliSpot is an open source captive portal or wireless LAN access point
                        controller. It supports web based login which is today's standard for
                        public HotSpots and it supports Wireless Protected Access (WPA) which
                        is the standard of the future. Authentication, Authorization and
                        Accounting (AAA) is handled by your favorite radius server.

                        Read more on http://www.chillispot.info

                        > Need more info. How do you know your wireless card works? Can it
                        > ping and connect to other machines on your network? Is the problem
                        > only that you can't get out onto the internet? What's your network
                        > setup? Are you using an off the shell router? Are you using a system
                        > as a firewall/router? Are you using a NAT setup? There are quite a
                        > few variables to "Why doesn't my computer get on the internet?"
                        >
                        > As for the other thing... do some research in configuring NFS and
                        > Samba. NFS is the *nix protocol for remote mounting filesystems.
                        > Samba is the Linux version of the Windows protocol and lets your
                        > Windows systems mount disks on a Linux machine, as well as doing
                        > printer sharing and so forth.
                        > ~~~I have an old several 4gb ATA IDE( Old IMB Thinkpad Hard Drives) via usb connector( Found at Goodwill for 3 dollars when A new one is around $50 but now theres Usb conectors for SATA out there too) hooked windoze machine in network rest the house use it for certain doc or pics great deal to use old ATA IDE Drive why let them go to waste.

                        > So look those up, see how far you get, and come for help when/if you
                        > get stuck :-)
                        >
                        > Cheers
                        > Jeff
                        > --
                        >
                        > Joan Crawford - "I, Joan Crawford, I believe in the dollar.
                        > Everything I earn, I spend." -
                        > http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/joan_crawford.html
                        >
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.