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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: How to connect to Internet using Wi-Fi in Linux

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  • Roy
    If you want to connect automatically it is better to use wicd (pronounced wicked) which runs as a daemon. It takes more time up front to set it up, but it will
    Message 1 of 11 , May 30 5:47 AM
      If you want to connect automatically it is better to use wicd (pronounced
      wicked) which runs as a daemon. It takes more time up front to set it up,
      but it will connect you automatically even before you logon. Otherwise
      Networkmanager will do the job, but its default is set for roaming so you
      will have to connect manually each time which is no bother for most people.

      Roy
      Linux: Fast, friendly, flexible and ... free!
      Support open Source
      <,*)}}+<
      Only dead fish go with the flow.
      Follow LinuxCanuck on Twitter or Identi.ca for the latest news.



      2009/5/29 Scott <scottro@...>

      >
      >
      > On Tue, May 19, 2009 at 03:48:50PM -0000, chanbr wrote:
      > > I have the Ubuntu CD. I have not installed it yet. I want to know if
      > there is such a thing as "Connect To" on Linux before I make the switch
      > (from XP to Linux). Thanks.
      >
      > You mean something that shows wireless networks and gives you a chance
      > to connect, filling in user and password if necessary? Yes,
      > NetworkManager.
      >
      > As long as Ubuntu recognizes the card, that should work.
      >
      > --
      > Scott Robbins
      > PGP keyID EB3467D6
      > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
      > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
      >
      > Wesley: I can't tell you how sorry I am that I allowed this to happen.
      > Cordelia: I believe it was Faith who allowed her elbow to collide with
      > my face.
      >
      > Wesley: At least you only got the elbow.
      > Cordelia: Well, if it's any consolation, it looks like you were
      > tortured by a much larger woman
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Neeley
      I use Kubuntu, and could not get their wifi to work with an ASCII WEP encrypted setup. I trued Ubuntu and it was the same deal with it. I then hooked up with
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 1, 2009
        I use Kubuntu, and could not get their wifi to work with an ASCII WEP encrypted setup. I trued Ubuntu and it was the same deal with it. I then hooked up with an Ethernet cable and downloaded WICD and it works flawlessly.

        I also use unetbootin to load these days from a USB key rather than from a CD. This makes the whole process simple, fast, and painless even for those with no CD (such as netbooks) or ones with malfunctioning CD units (like my laptop at the moment).

        The problem with WEP security and the Ubuntu wireless setups is a common one, unfortunately. Why they can't seem to get this right I have no earthly idea.

        David

        --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Scott <scottro@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Tue, May 19, 2009 at 03:48:50PM -0000, chanbr wrote:
        > > I have the Ubuntu CD. I have not installed it yet. I want to know if there is such a thing as "Connect To" on Linux before I make the switch (from XP to Linux). Thanks.
        >
        >
        > You mean something that shows wireless networks and gives you a chance
        > to connect, filling in user and password if necessary? Yes,
        > NetworkManager.
        >
        > As long as Ubuntu recognizes the card, that should work.
        >
        > --
        > Scott Robbins
        > PGP keyID EB3467D6
        > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
        > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
        >
        >
        > Wesley: I can't tell you how sorry I am that I allowed this to happen.
        > Cordelia: I believe it was Faith who allowed her elbow to collide with
        > my face.
        >
        > Wesley: At least you only got the elbow.
        > Cordelia: Well, if it's any consolation, it looks like you were
        > tortured by a much larger woman
        >
      • Roy
        Two great tips at once! Wicd works better than NetworkManager for people who want no fuss auto on wireless. Note: wicd is a daemon which means that you are
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 1, 2009
          Two great tips at once! Wicd works better than NetworkManager for people who
          want no fuss auto on wireless. Note: wicd is a daemon which means that you
          are connected on before you logon which means if your system breaks then you
          can fix it from the commandline and apt-get since you have a working
          internet connection. The other tip is one of my favourites and I use this
          programme almost daily. Unetbootin saves time of buring DVDs and it works
          for most distros, but not all.

          Thanks,
          Roy

          Linux: Fast, friendly, flexible and ... free!
          Support open Source
          <,*)}}+<
          Only dead fish go with the flow.
          Follow LinuxCanuck on Twitter or Identi.ca for the latest news.



          2009/6/1 David Neeley <dbneeley@...>

          >
          >
          > I use Kubuntu, and could not get their wifi to work with an ASCII WEP
          > encrypted setup. I trued Ubuntu and it was the same deal with it. I then
          > hooked up with an Ethernet cable and downloaded WICD and it works
          > flawlessly.
          >
          > I also use unetbootin to load these days from a USB key rather than from a
          > CD. This makes the whole process simple, fast, and painless even for those
          > with no CD (such as netbooks) or ones with malfunctioning CD units (like my
          > laptop at the moment).
          >
          > The problem with WEP security and the Ubuntu wireless setups is a common
          > one, unfortunately. Why they can't seem to get this right I have no earthly
          > idea.
          >
          > David
          >
          >
          > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com <LINUX_Newbies%40yahoogroups.com>,
          > Scott <scottro@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > On Tue, May 19, 2009 at 03:48:50PM -0000, chanbr wrote:
          > > > I have the Ubuntu CD. I have not installed it yet. I want to know if
          > there is such a thing as "Connect To" on Linux before I make the switch
          > (from XP to Linux). Thanks.
          > >
          > >
          > > You mean something that shows wireless networks and gives you a chance
          > > to connect, filling in user and password if necessary? Yes,
          > > NetworkManager.
          > >
          > > As long as Ubuntu recognizes the card, that should work.
          > >
          > > --
          > > Scott Robbins
          > > PGP keyID EB3467D6
          > > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
          > > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
          > >
          > >
          > > Wesley: I can't tell you how sorry I am that I allowed this to happen.
          > > Cordelia: I believe it was Faith who allowed her elbow to collide with
          > > my face.
          > >
          > > Wesley: At least you only got the elbow.
          > > Cordelia: Well, if it's any consolation, it looks like you were
          > > tortured by a much larger woman
          > >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Gary
          With KDE-based distros, KNetworkManager works pretty well; I prefer it to KNemo or other connection utilities. It uses KWallet to store your WEP/WPA keys for
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 22, 2009
            With KDE-based distros, KNetworkManager works pretty well; I prefer it to KNemo or other connection utilities. It uses KWallet to store your WEP/WPA keys for future reference, so connecting securely to established bases like one's own home, or a friend's, is automatic after the first time. I like the balloon popup that tells me what frequency/channel all detected access points are using, handy for troubleshooting frequency contention when setting up one's own wifi. I just had to get used to RIGHT-clicking the KNetworkManager tray icon to establish a desired connection.

            --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Roy <linuxcanuck@...> wrote:
            >
            > If you want to connect automatically it is better to use wicd (pronounced
            > wicked) which runs as a daemon. It takes more time up front to set it up,
            > but it will connect you automatically even before you logon. Otherwise
            > Networkmanager will do the job, but its default is set for roaming so you
            > will have to connect manually each time which is no bother for most people.
            >
            > Roy
            > Linux: Fast, friendly, flexible and ... free!
            > Support open Source
            > <,*)}}+<
            > Only dead fish go with the flow.
            > Follow LinuxCanuck on Twitter or Identi.ca for the latest news.
            >
            >
            >
            > 2009/5/29 Scott <scottro@...>
            >
            > >
            > >
            > > On Tue, May 19, 2009 at 03:48:50PM -0000, chanbr wrote:
            > > > I have the Ubuntu CD. I have not installed it yet. I want to know if
            > > there is such a thing as "Connect To" on Linux before I make the switch
            > > (from XP to Linux). Thanks.
            > >
            > > You mean something that shows wireless networks and gives you a chance
            > > to connect, filling in user and password if necessary? Yes,
            > > NetworkManager.
            > >
            > > As long as Ubuntu recognizes the card, that should work.
            > >
            > > --
            > > Scott Robbins
            > > PGP keyID EB3467D6
            > > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
            > > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
            > >
            > > Wesley: I can't tell you how sorry I am that I allowed this to happen.
            > > Cordelia: I believe it was Faith who allowed her elbow to collide with
            > > my face.
            > >
            > > Wesley: At least you only got the elbow.
            > > Cordelia: Well, if it's any consolation, it looks like you were
            > > tortured by a much larger woman
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • David Neeley
            I use KDE by preference...currently Kubuntu Jaunty. I have seldom been able to get KNetworkmanager to work with ASCII passphrase WEP on my wireless
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 23, 2009
              I use KDE by preference...currently Kubuntu Jaunty.

              I have seldom been able to get KNetworkmanager to work with ASCII passphrase WEP on my wireless router...and not at all for the last several releases.

              Instead, I installed WICD and had no trouble at all with it.

              If you install Linux and have an Ethernet port free on your router or modem, you can download any software you wish to get the wireless connection working properly. For me, WICD solved my problem painlessly.

              By contrast, KNetworkmanager works fine with an unencrypted wifi link, or even with WEP so long as you don't use an ASCII passphrase.

              David


              --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "Gary" <xheralt@...> wrote:
              >
              > With KDE-based distros, KNetworkManager works pretty well; I prefer it to KNemo or other connection utilities. It uses KWallet to store your WEP/WPA keys for future reference, so connecting securely to established bases like one's own home, or a friend's, is automatic after the first time. I like the balloon popup that tells me what frequency/channel all detected access points are using, handy for troubleshooting frequency contention when setting up one's own wifi. I just had to get used to RIGHT-clicking the KNetworkManager tray icon to establish a desired connection.
              >
              > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Roy <linuxcanuck@> wrote:
              > >
              > > If you want to connect automatically it is better to use wicd (pronounced
              > > wicked) which runs as a daemon. It takes more time up front to set it up,
              > > but it will connect you automatically even before you logon. Otherwise
              > > Networkmanager will do the job, but its default is set for roaming so you
              > > will have to connect manually each time which is no bother for most people.
              > >
              > > Roy
              > > Linux: Fast, friendly, flexible and ... free!
              > > Support open Source
              > > <,*)}}+<
              > > Only dead fish go with the flow.
              > > Follow LinuxCanuck on Twitter or Identi.ca for the latest news.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > 2009/5/29 Scott <scottro@>
              > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > On Tue, May 19, 2009 at 03:48:50PM -0000, chanbr wrote:
              > > > > I have the Ubuntu CD. I have not installed it yet. I want to know if
              > > > there is such a thing as "Connect To" on Linux before I make the switch
              > > > (from XP to Linux). Thanks.
              > > >
              > > > You mean something that shows wireless networks and gives you a chance
              > > > to connect, filling in user and password if necessary? Yes,
              > > > NetworkManager.
              > > >
              > > > As long as Ubuntu recognizes the card, that should work.
              > > >
              > > > --
              > > > Scott Robbins
              > > > PGP keyID EB3467D6
              > > > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
              > > > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
              > > >
              > > > Wesley: I can't tell you how sorry I am that I allowed this to happen.
              > > > Cordelia: I believe it was Faith who allowed her elbow to collide with
              > > > my face.
              > > >
              > > > Wesley: At least you only got the elbow.
              > > > Cordelia: Well, if it's any consolation, it looks like you were
              > > > tortured by a much larger woman
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
            • Gary
              Interesting point -- I ve actually been having trouble at one access point that uses WPA -- with an ascii passcode -- that USED to work, whereas I ve had no
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 25, 2009
                Interesting point -- I've actually been having trouble at one access point that uses WPA -- with an ascii passcode -- that USED to work, whereas I've had no trouble with WEP, but on reflection, those have all been hex passcodes. This sounds pretty pervasive; one hopes it hasn't gone unremarked in the KDE developer's camp...

                --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "David Neeley" <dbneeley@...> wrote:
                >
                > I use KDE by preference...currently Kubuntu Jaunty.
                >
                > I have seldom been able to get KNetworkmanager to work with ASCII passphrase WEP on my wireless router...and not at all for the last several releases.
                >
                > Instead, I installed WICD and had no trouble at all with it.
                >
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