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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Hard Disk Free Space Consolidation At End

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  • Bruce Kemp
    ... After doing a defrag on the MS disk, install Ubuntu over the top of MS, there is a point in the install that asks how you want to partition the hard drive,
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 31, 2007
      neils93940 wrote:
      > What program is available to move all the disk files to the front so
      > that I can partition C: during Ubuntu installation?
      >
      > Essentially, need to find how to have all unused C: drive space
      > consolidated onto the end, hence all files to be packed into the
      > beginning. Used to be able to do this with Norton Speedisk on earlier
      > M$Win OS's; but, XP appears to prevent doing this.
      >
      After doing a defrag on the MS disk, install Ubuntu over the top of MS,
      there is a point in the install that asks how you want to partition the
      hard drive, just tell it to use the guided partitioning on the free space.
      >
      > ALSO, some are telling me Linux can read/write NTFS partitions. If
      > so, I would use that for all the Ubuntu partitions save the Linux
      > SwapFile Partition. For a while, I expect to be dual booting to be
      > able to keep productively working until I can convert all I have from
      > M$ to Ubuntu. Otherwise, the data partition could be Ext2 as I found
      > a driver for M$WinXP which allows XP to read/write to an Ext2
      > formatted partition. Hmmmmm...... Need help on this one too.....
      >
      >
      > I use a program on MS called ext2ifs that allows NTFS to read the ext2
      > partition. The program can be seen and downloaded from
      > http://www.fs-driver.org/
      >
      >
      >
      >

      Bruce

      --
      How is it possible for the human body, which was created in the image of god, to be offensive to anybody? Satan would love to see God's greatest creation be considered offensive.
    • Norm Higgs
      ... IMHO, you don t want or need the Linux system to be able to write to the Windows system partition and vice versa. Best to make a common FAT32 partition for
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 31, 2007
        Bruce Kemp wrote:
        > neils93940 wrote:
        >
        >> What program is available to move all the disk files to the front so
        >> that I can partition C: during Ubuntu installation?
        >>
        >> Essentially, need to find how to have all unused C: drive space
        >> consolidated onto the end, hence all files to be packed into the
        >> beginning. Used to be able to do this with Norton Speedisk on earlier
        >> M$Win OS's; but, XP appears to prevent doing this.
        >>
        >>
        > After doing a defrag on the MS disk, install Ubuntu over the top of MS,
        > there is a point in the install that asks how you want to partition the
        > hard drive, just tell it to use the guided partitioning on the free space.
        >
        >> ALSO, some are telling me Linux can read/write NTFS partitions. If
        >> so, I would use that for all the Ubuntu partitions save the Linux
        >> SwapFile Partition. For a while, I expect to be dual booting to be
        >> able to keep productively working until I can convert all I have from
        >> M$ to Ubuntu. Otherwise, the data partition could be Ext2 as I found
        >> a driver for M$WinXP which allows XP to read/write to an Ext2
        >> formatted partition. Hmmmmm...... Need help on this one too.....
        >>
        >>
        >> I use a program on MS called ext2ifs that allows NTFS to read the ext2
        >> partition. The program can be seen and downloaded from
        >> http://www.fs-driver.org/
        >>
        >>
        >>

        IMHO, you don't want or need the Linux system to be able to write to the
        Windows system partition and vice versa. Best to make a common FAT32
        partition for data files that will be common to both operating systems
        and keep the OS partitions totally separated from each other. Too risky
        IMO, for one system could easily trash the file system of the other.

        --
        Norm Higgs
        http://forbiddenpc.com
        http://forbiddenpc.blogspot.com
        https://linkedin.com/e/fpf/4018099
        http://freetrafficbar.com?r=74276
      • Robert C Wittig
        ... This is exactly what I did for my Samba shares, which reside on my Linux Red Hat machine, and are accessed by W2k and OpenBSD machines. Mostly, these share
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 2 4:14 AM
          Norm Higgs wrote:

          > IMHO, you don't want or need the Linux system to be able to write to the
          > Windows system partition and vice versa. Best to make a common FAT32
          > partition for data files that will be common to both operating systems
          > and keep the OS partitions totally separated from each other. Too risky
          > IMO, for one system could easily trash the file system of the other.
          >

          This is exactly what I did for my Samba shares, which reside on my
          Linux Red Hat machine, and are accessed by W2k and OpenBSD machines.

          Mostly, these share are just file repositories, which see files
          written to them only once, and are only very rarely modified.

          Because of the way msdos file systems store things, FAT32 will
          fragment files much more than *nix-type file systems, if there are a
          lot of rewrites to the files, which is something worth keeping in
          mind, over the long term.


          --
          -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
          http://robertwittig.net/
          http://robertwittig.org/
          .
        • Gary
          ... Defragmenting the MS drive from within Windoze first is a good idea. Just about all current Linux distros will have HD partitioning tools
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 2 11:38 AM
            --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "neils93940" <hilltop@...> wrote:
            >
            > Have just gotten my first M$WinXP on which to dual boot load Ubuntu 710.
            >
            > What program is available to move all the disk files to the front so
            > that I can partition C: during Ubuntu installation?
            >

            Defragmenting the MS drive from within Windoze first is a good idea.
            Just about all current Linux distros will have HD partitioning tools
            (Gparted/Qtparted) that RESIZE partitions -- if any files need to be
            moved to fit the newly-shrunk NTFS/XP partition, the program will do
            it for you. You can also do it Windows-side with a program such as
            Partition Magic. Of course, this is a delicate operation, a power
            glitch at the wrong moment would be utterly disastrous. Having all
            irreplacable data backed up first is a must, unless you like to live
            dangerously!

            > I tried that with a move onto an external using the Ubuntu CD bootup
            > and after I moved all the files back I found the files were back in
            > the same scattered locations and all the long file names in the
            > registry were reduced to 6~1.3 format.
            >
            > Need to know how folks are doing this.
            >
            > ALSO, some are telling me Linux can read/write NTFS partitions. If
            > so, I would use that for all the Ubuntu partitions save the Linux
            > SwapFile Partition. For a while, I expect to be dual booting to be
            > able to keep productively working until I can convert all I have from
            > M$ to Ubuntu. Otherwise, the data partition could be Ext2 as I found
            > a driver for M$WinXP which allows XP to read/write to an Ext2
            > formatted partition. Hmmmmm...... Need help on this one too.....

            As noted elsewhere, keeping a separate FAT32 partition is best. NTFS
            read-write from Linux, while possible, tends to give XP fits; you'll
            find yourself bluescreening on XP bootup a lot. XP will immediately
            reboot and recover, and no files will be lost (that I've ever
            noticed), but it's a pain in the patootie. With a little bit of
            trickery (c/o a Windoze tweaking program like TweakUI) you can even
            redirect your "My Documents" directory to that common FAT32 partition.
          • Gary - US
            ... Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 19:38:25 -0000 From: Gary Reply-To: LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com Subject: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: Hard Disk Free
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 2 11:47 AM
              ----- Message from xheralt@... ---------
              Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 19:38:25 -0000
              From: Gary <xheralt@...>
              Reply-To: LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: Hard Disk Free Space Consolidation At End
              To: LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com


              > --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "neils93940" <hilltop@...> wrote:
              >>
              > As noted elsewhere, keeping a separate FAT32 partition is best. NTFS
              > read-write from Linux, while possible, tends to give XP fits; you'll
              > find yourself bluescreening on XP bootup a lot. XP will immediately
              > reboot and recover, and no files will be lost (that I've ever
              > noticed), but it's a pain in the patootie. With a little bit of
              > trickery (c/o a Windoze tweaking program like TweakUI) you can even
              > redirect your "My Documents" directory to that common FAT32 partition.
              >
              I've been reading and writing to NTFS partitions for months with Mint
              Linux and have had no BSOD, reboots, or any other issues. Maybe I am
              just lucky. As far as moving the location of your My Documents
              folder, you don't need any special tweaking tool for that. Just right
              click on the icon and and select the "Move" button and type in or
              browse to where you want it to be located. Quite simple.


              --
              Semper Fi & God Bless the U.S.A.,
              Gary in KC

              <Proud Dad Of A U.S. Marine Operation Iraqi Freedom Vet>
            • Robert C Wittig
              ... I m still using Red Hat Enterprise 3, which did not support NTFS writes, and was iffy on NTFS reads, when it was released. Reading, and particularly
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 3 3:24 AM
                Gary - US wrote:

                > I've been reading and writing to NTFS partitions for months with Mint
                > Linux and have had no BSOD, reboots, or any other issues. Maybe I am
                > just lucky.

                I'm still using Red Hat Enterprise 3, which did not support NTFS
                writes, and was iffy on NTFS reads, when it was released.

                Reading, and particularly writing to NTFS is still 'new technology'
                for Linux, so if you do detect any weirdness over the long haul, it is
                a point I would be interested in knowing about, because I do still
                maintain a Win2k installation, and plan on eventually upgrading my Red
                Hat Desktop to something more current.

                My OpenBSD 4.0 desktop to the best of my knowledge has zero NTFS
                support, but I am still a relative newbie running NTFS on the Desktop,
                and on my OBSD server, it is not an issue.


                --
                -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
                http://robertwittig.net/
                http://robertwittig.org/
                .
              • Roy Charles
                You can either have Ubuntu use the available space on drive C or you can manually use the partition manager, gparted. The easiest way for a novice is to use
                Message 7 of 8 , Jan 3 2:51 PM
                  You can either have Ubuntu use the available space on drive C or you can manually use the partition manager, gparted. The easiest way for a novice is to use the defaults, but I prefer to set-up things manually.

                  I like three partitions for Linux. With your Windows partition that makes four altogether. You will first need to resize your Windows partition (smaller) to make room for Ubuntu. You can run all of Ubuntu from one partition, but there are good reasons to use separate partitions. I am not sure if you need to first make and extended partition from
                  your empty space after re-sizing Windows, not having done this in a
                  while. I suspect that you do. If this is the case, then you will have
                  to do this before making your Linux partition(s). This is all done graphically. You can either drag the handles to make the drive smaller or you can type in the boxes.

                  I suggest that you back up essential data in your Windows drive before beginning, just in case.

                  Three partition method:

                  You will need a tiny one for a swap disk. This should equal the amount of RAM you have in your computer. Bigger isn't necessarily better. 512 MB is usually enough. Format it as a swap disk format.

                  How large you make your other partitions is up to you. If you plan on changing the system lots and add lots of applications, then you will need room to grow. If you have lots of HD space then choose 10 - 20 GB of the root partition. If you have little HD space then choose 4 GB. Choose ext3 for your FS format. For the root partition set the mount point as /.

                  You will also want a home partition. It can be small or large depending on available space and your habits. If you do lots of downloading using file sharing programs, collect pictures, videos or music then this uses lots of space. Format it as ext3 as well and set the mount point as /home.

                  You can run it all from one ext3 partition with your home directory included, but if you need to re-install at any point you lose all of your data and preference settings. If you use separate partitions you can re-install or upgrade without losing anything.

                  Good luck!


                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: neils93940 <hilltop@...>
                  To: LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, December 31, 2007 2:31:09 AM
                  Subject: [LINUX_Newbies] Hard Disk Free Space Consolidation At End














                  Have just gotten my first M$WinXP on which to dual boot load Ubuntu 710.



                  What program is available to move all the disk files to the front so

                  that I can partition C: during Ubuntu installation?



                  Essentially, need to find how to have all unused C: drive space

                  consolidated onto the end, hence all files to be packed into the

                  beginning. Used to be able to do this with Norton Speedisk on earlier

                  M$Win OS's; but, XP appears to prevent doing this.



                  Alternative is to find a reliable backup onto CD to allow wiping C:

                  drive followed by partitioning and then reload back in from that backup.



                  I tried that with a move onto an external using the Ubuntu CD bootup

                  and after I moved all the files back I found the files were back in

                  the same scattered locations and all the long file names in the

                  registry were reduced to 6~1.3 format.



                  Need to know how folks are doing this.



                  ALSO, some are telling me Linux can read/write NTFS partitions. If

                  so, I would use that for all the Ubuntu partitions save the Linux

                  SwapFile Partition. For a while, I expect to be dual booting to be

                  able to keep productively working until I can convert all I have from

                  M$ to Ubuntu. Otherwise, the data partition could be Ext2 as I found

                  a driver for M$WinXP which allows XP to read/write to an Ext2

                  formatted partition. Hmmmmm...... Need help on this one too.....
















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