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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] .tar .bz2

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  • Mike Brandonisio
    Hi, You need to unpack the file. A tar file is like a zip file and tar.bz2 is a tar file that was created using bz2 compression. This should help:
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 19, 2007
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      Hi,

      You need to unpack the file. A tar file is like a zip file and
      tar.bz2 is a tar file that was created using bz2 compression.

      This should help:
      http://www.cs.duke.edu/~ola/courses/programming/tar.html

      Sincerely,
      Mike
      --
      Mike Brandonisio * Web Hosting
      Tech One Illustration * Internet Marketing
      tel (630) 759-9283 * e-Commerce
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      On Sep 18, 2007, at 6:40 PM, dr_ovalle wrote:

      > Hi everyone, I´m brand new to Linux, I bought few books and I´m
      > starting.
      >
      > I installed Sabayon 3.4f x86_64 on a laptop Acer Aspire 5050-4872.
      > It is very nice, but I have several problems, and I am trying to fix
      > the first one...
      >
      > It does not recognize my Wireless card.
      >
      > I tryied to install Madwifi, so I opened a root console, and typed:
      >
      > # emerge madwifi-ng
      >
      > It tryied to connect to the internet to download a driver madwifi-ng-
      > 0.9.4.tar.bz2, of course, there is not internet in that computer, so
      > I manually downloaded it in another computer running Windows XP, but,
      > the .tar file it downloads is madwifi-ng-0.9.4.tar.tar
      >
      > I copyied that file to /usr/portage/distfiles and tryied again the
      > same sentence: emerge madwifi-ng
      >
      > And it does not recognize the .tar.tar file and try to download
      > the .tar.bz2 file.
      >
      > Does anyone know what I am doing wrong, and could explain it to me
      > step by step ( I just have three days trying Linux, and I am not
      > academically inmerse in computers, just few books and magazines, and
      > I don´t speak english very well, so ) I need help.
      >
      > Thank you.
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this list, please email LINUX_Newbies-
      > unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • dr_ovalle
      Thank you for your answer. I tried writing the command tar, and it worked. I bought some books, but they look like if they were written in ancient greek.
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 19, 2007
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        Thank you for your answer.

        I tried writing the command tar, and it worked.

        I bought some books, but they look like if they were written in ancient
        greek. However I´m trying to understand them, some advances at this
        time. Any recommendation about a book (or maybe a webpage of a wiki)
        for a starter who really want to learn Linux, specially the commands?
      • Scott
        ... It s difficult, once you have experience, to judge what is good for a newcomer. For the tar command, I ll recommend my own page,
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 19, 2007
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          On Wed, Sep 19, 2007 at 07:56:00PM +0000, dr_ovalle wrote:
          > Thank you for your answer.
          >
          >
          > I bought some books, but they look like if they were written in ancient
          > greek. However I´m trying to understand them, some advances at this
          > time. Any recommendation about a book (or maybe a webpage of a wiki)
          > for a starter who really want to learn Linux, specially the commands?

          It's difficult, once you have experience, to judge what is good for a
          newcomer. For the tar command, I'll recommend my own page,
          http://home.nyc.rr.com/computertaijutsu/tarball.html

          The list's FAQ links to a book on the Linux Documentation project page,
          the Linux Installation and Getting Started Guide. Though the book is
          very very dated by now, the introduction to the shell and getting used
          to the commands is still, in my opinion, quite useful for the beginner.

          The Unleashed Book for your distribution might be good. I haven't been
          following the thread, so I don't know what distribution you're using,
          but many of them have wikis that will often be helpful.

          Unfortunately, the Linux man pages are known to be about the worst man
          pages for any Unix or Unix like system. For example, a classic example
          is the man page for ls--in Linux--well, no, this would be a GNU app, so
          they should take the blame, it tells you that ls -F will add a /,@ and
          some other things to the listing. However, they can't be bothered to
          tell you what that means. The FreeBSD man page for ls, on the other
          hand, explains that it will add a / to a directory, an @ to a link, etc.

          So, I think I would start with that Linux Guide mentioned in the FAQ,
          and then look at around at your distribution's site, and see if they
          have a wiki. Google for something like linux command tutorials--you'll
          get hundreds of thousands of hits, and just click on a few and see if
          any strike you as helpful to you.

          It's a bit difficult to get started because to understand A, you have to
          understand B, but can't understand B till you've learned C. As a friend
          once wrote,

          ======================================

          With cryptic tutorials on the net with phrases like "enable SMTP AUTH
          for
          Postfix", as if that is supposed to be a self standing instruction, this
          is
          beyond both my ability and the scope of my endeavors.

          =======================================

          However, dig around and you WILL find tutorials written by people who
          understand that such things are not self-standing instructions.

          After awhile, you'll find that it's either too aggravating to be worth
          your time, or, hopefully, something that's a lot of fun.

          --
          Scott Robbins
          PGP keyID EB3467D6
          ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
          gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

          Buffy: Ampata wasn't evil. At least, not to begin with.
          And...I do think she cared
          about you.
          Xander: Yeah, but I think that whole sucking the life out of people
          thing
          would've been a strain on the relationship.
        • dr_ovalle
          Thank you for your advise. I checked your page, and I think is very helpful for me. I am practicing those comands in the console mode, I hope not to mess
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 19, 2007
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            Thank you for your advise.

            I checked your page, and I think is very helpful for me. I am
            practicing those comands in the console mode, I hope not to mess
            anything.

            Unfortunately, there is no Unleashed book for Sabayon yet(the distro
            I´m using), however, I think is a lot of fun learning in the internet
            too.

            I am trying to resolve the problems in my laptop, I haven´t done it
            yet, but I am learning (fast I hope). I am consulting webpages in
            three languages and getting a lot of help from people like you, and I
            see, there is plenty of information, but it is disperse, and its
            variable, depending on the distro you are using. However I´m doing
            things in the text mode, and suiting the commands for my distro when
            the commands don´t work as advised.

            I met a guy who offered to fix the issues in my computer, but that is
            not what I want. I want to do it myself.

            Thank you very much. I´ll read all that.
          • Scott
            ... Ah, OK. Sabayon is based on Gentoo--Daniel Robbins, who created Gentoo, writes some of the best documentation out there. (He has a bash tutorial--if you
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 19, 2007
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              On Thu, Sep 20, 2007 at 04:16:57AM +0000, dr_ovalle wrote:
              > Thank you for your advise.
              >
              >
              > Unfortunately, there is no Unleashed book for Sabayon yet(the distro
              > I´m using), however, I think is a lot of fun learning in the internet
              > too.

              Ah, OK. Sabayon is based on Gentoo--Daniel Robbins, who created Gentoo,
              writes some of the best documentation out there. (He has a bash
              tutorial--if you go to gentoo.org and on the menu on the left, you'll
              see towards the bottom, something called either developer works or IBM
              or something--it links to some of his articles.

              The Gentoo forums and wiki might also be helpful. Sabayon is a
              relatively new distribution, and I don't know how much they have in the
              way of documentation--from what little I understand (I haven't used
              Sabayon and I haven't used Gentoo in several years) the differences are
              probably to your benefit, Sabayon should be more newcomer friendly.

              >
              > I am trying to resolve the problems in my laptop, I haven´t done it
              > yet, but I am learning (fast I hope). I am consulting webpages in
              > three languages

              What languages? (Idle curiosity).


              and getting a lot of help from people like you, and I
              > see, there is plenty of information, but it is disperse, and its
              > variable, depending on the distro you are using.

              Yes, that's always a problem. You might become, for example, an expert
              on RedHat based distributions, then you change to a Debian based one and
              you have to learn a whole new set of commands to, for example, change
              default startup scripts and the like. This holds true for any O/S of
              course--it's easier to make the transition from one BSD to another, but
              there are still things that will be different.

              As you say, the information is scattered all over the place. Even the
              BSD's, which are more unified (that is to say, FreeBSD, for example, has
              one web site with a ton of information) will have a FAQ here, another
              thing here in their handbook, and a third thing in yet another place.
              With Linux, especially with over 400 distributions (though most of them
              are based on 6 or 7 distributions) it's bewildering.

              At times, rude people will say RTFM. (Read the erm, Fine Manual). Feel
              free to quote my earlier statement that Linux man pages are the absolute
              worst.

              On the other hand, you'll often get nice people who will point you to a
              forum or thread that will help, and often they'll even find the thread
              for you.

              One thing that will help--once you understand the basics of a command,
              you can then look at the man page--even Linux man pages become clearer
              after awhile. (I'm very down on them right now--for the last 6 years
              I've been working more with FreeBSD, recently changed jobs, and now work
              primarily with Linux. It's like learning to play guitar on a terrible
              instrument, then, getting a good one, then having to go back to the
              terrible one.)

              However, the situation is improving--many third party applications for
              example, have documentation written by people who are enthusiastic about
              the program and write clearly.

              Yes, the information is all over the web. Daniel Robbins' bash shell
              articles might help, or might be a bit too much right now. One doesn't
              eat an elephant in a single bite. You'll find that it gradually becomes
              clearer and clearer--where you start with baby steps, after awhile,
              you'll be taking larger steps.


              However I´m doing
              > things in the text mode, and suiting the commands for my distro when
              > the commands don´t work as advised.

              Heh, yup, that happens a lot. :) Sometimes, whatever you're reading
              will be outdated, or, as different distros put things in different
              places, you'll get file not found, etc. etc. Again, with time, you'll
              become better at dealing with that. You sound like you have the right
              attitude and are enjoying it.
              >
              > I met a guy who offered to fix the issues in my computer, but that is
              > not what I want. I want to do it myself.

              Well, I'm sure that sometimes he will be able to answer a question.
              It's not really cheating. :)

              >
              > Thank you very much. I´ll read all that.

              Hang in there, it sounds like you're doing fine. And don't worry
              about the times when you're ready to smash the laptop on the ground or,
              (even worse, perhaps) go back to Windows. It happens to the best of us.



              --
              Scott Robbins
              PGP keyID EB3467D6
              ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
              gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

              Joyce: Something's gonna eat those babies?
              Principal Snyder: I think that is so wrong.
            • Michael Sullivan
              On Thu, 2007-09-20 at 04:16 +0000, dr_ovalle wrote: ... Sabayan is a pet project of the Gentoo distrobution, so you might look for a book
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 20, 2007
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                On Thu, 2007-09-20 at 04:16 +0000, dr_ovalle wrote:
                <trimmed>
                > Unfortunately, there is no Unleashed book for Sabayon yet(the distro
                > I´m using), however, I think is a lot of fun learning in the internet
                > too.
                <trimmed>

                Sabayan is a pet project of the Gentoo distrobution, so you might look
                for a book on Gentoo...
              • dr_ovalle
                Hi Scott, thank you for your answer. I consult information over the internet in three languages: Spanish (I´m mexican), English and French. I´ve studied
                Message 7 of 13 , Sep 20, 2007
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                  Hi Scott, thank you for your answer.

                  I consult information over the internet in three languages: Spanish
                  (I´m mexican), English and French. I´ve studied English and French,
                  but I never speak in those languages, I don´t have anyone to talk
                  with.

                  I have a question, maybe you could help. I´m consulting Gentoo Linux
                  AMD64 Documentation (you´re right, there is plenty of information in
                  there, and newbie-friendly), but it recommends to get the gentoo-
                  sources to configure the kernel:

                  http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-amd64.xml?
                  full=1#book_part1_chap7

                  7. Configuring the Kernel
                  7.a. Timezone

                  You first need to select your timezone so that your system knows
                  where it is located. Look for your timezone in /usr/share/zoneinfo,
                  then copy it to /etc/localtime. Please avoid
                  the /usr/share/zoneinfo/Etc/GMT* timezones as their names do not
                  indicate the expected zones. For instance, GMT-8 is in fact GMT+8.

                  Code Listing 1: Setting the timezone information

                  # ls /usr/share/zoneinfo
                  (Suppose you want to use GMT)
                  # cp /usr/share/zoneinfo/GMT /etc/localtime


                  7.b. Installing the Sources

                  Choosing a Kernel

                  The core around which all distributions are built is the Linux
                  kernel. It is the layer between the user programs and your system
                  hardware. Gentoo provides its users several possible kernel sources.
                  A full listing with description is available at the Gentoo Kernel
                  Guide.

                  For AMD64-based systems we have gentoo-sources (kernel source patched
                  with amd64 specific fixes for stability, performance and hardware
                  support).

                  Choose your kernel source and install it using emerge.

                  Code Listing 2: Installing a kernel source

                  # emerge gentoo-sources


                  When you take a look in /usr/src you should see a symlink called
                  linux pointing to your kernel source. In this case, the installed
                  kernel source points to gentoo-sources-2.6.19-r5. Your version may be
                  different, so keep this in mind.

                  Code Listing 3: Viewing the kernel source symlink

                  # ls -l /usr/src/linux
                  lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 12 Oct 13 11:04 /usr/src/linux ->
                  linux-2.6.19-r5


                  Now it is time to configure and compile your kernel source. You can
                  use genkernel for this, which will build a generic kernel as used by
                  the Installation CD. We explain the "manual" configuration first
                  though, as it is the best way to optimize your environment.

                  If you want to manually configure your kernel, continue now with
                  Default: Manual Configuration. If you want to use genkernel you
                  should read Alternative: Using genkernel instead.

                  7.c. Default: Manual Configuration

                  Introduction

                  Manually configuring a kernel is often seen as the most difficult
                  procedure a Linux user ever has to perform. Nothing is less true --
                  after configuring a couple of kernels you don't even remember that it
                  was difficult ;)

                  However, one thing is true: you must know your system when you start
                  configuring a kernel manually. Most information can be gathered by
                  emerging pciutils (emerge pciutils) which contains lspci. You will
                  now be able to use lspci within the chrooted environment. You may
                  safely ignore any pcilib warnings (like pcilib: cannot
                  open /sys/bus/pci/devices) that lspci throws out. Alternatively, you
                  can run lspci from a non-chrooted environment. The results are the
                  same. You can also run lsmod to see what kernel modules the
                  Installation CD uses (it might provide you with a nice hint on what
                  to enable).

                  Now go to your kernel source directory and execute make menuconfig.
                  This will fire up an ncurses-based configuration menu.

                  Code Listing 4: Invoking menuconfig

                  # cd /usr/src/linux
                  # make menuconfig


                  You will be greeted with several configuration sections. We'll first
                  list some options you must activate (otherwise Gentoo will not
                  function, or not function properly without additional tweaks).

                  Activating Required Options

                  First of all, activate the use of development and experimental
                  code/drivers. You need this, otherwise some very important
                  code/drivers won't show up:

                  Code Listing 5: Selecting experimental code/drivers

                  Code maturity level options --->
                  [*] Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers


                  Make sure that every driver that is vital to the booting of your
                  system (such as SCSI controller, ...) is compiled in the kernel and
                  not as a module, otherwise your system will not be able to boot
                  completely.

                  We shall then select the exact processor type. The x86_64 kernel
                  maintainer strongly recommends users enable MCE features so that they
                  are able to be notified of any hardware problems. On x86_64, these
                  errors are not printed to dmesg like on other architectures, but
                  to /dev/mcelog. This requires the app-admin/mcelog package.

                  Code Listing 6: Selecting processor type and features

                  Processor type and features --->
                  [ ] Intel MCE Features
                  [ ] AMD MCE Features
                  Processor family (AMD-Opteron/Athlon64) --->
                  ( ) AMD-Opteron/Athlon64
                  ( ) Intel EM64T
                  ( ) Generic-x86-64


                  Now go to File Systems and select support for the filesystems you
                  use. Don't compile them as modules, otherwise your Gentoo system will
                  not be able to mount your partitions. Also select Virtual memory
                  and /proc file system.

                  Code Listing 7: Selecting necessary file systems

                  File systems --->
                  Pseudo Filesystems --->
                  [*] /proc file system support
                  [*] Virtual memory file system support (former shm fs)

                  (Select one or more of the following options as needed by your system)

                  Do not forget to enable DMA for your drives:

                  Code Listing 8: Activating DMA

                  Device Drivers --->
                  ATA/ATAPI/MFM/RLL support --->
                  [*] Generic PCI bus-master DMA support


                  If you are using PPPoE to connect to the Internet or you are using a
                  dial-up modem, you will need the following options in the kernel:

                  Code Listing 9: Selecting PPPoE necessary drivers

                  Device Drivers --->
                  Networking Support --->


                  The two compression options won't harm but are not definitely needed,
                  neither does the PPP over Ethernet option, that might only be used by
                  ppp when configured to do kernel mode PPPoE.

                  If you require it, don't forget to include support in the kernel for
                  your ethernet card.

                  If you have a multi-CPU Opteron or a multi-core (e.g. AMD64 X2)
                  system, you should activate "Symmetric multi-processing support":

                  Code Listing 10: Activating SMP support

                  Processor type and features --->
                  [*] Symmetric multi-processing support

                  Note: In multi-core systems, each core counts as one processor.


                  If you use USB Input Devices (like Keyboard or Mouse) don't forget to
                  enable those as well:

                  Code Listing 11: Activating USB Support for Input Devices

                  Device Drivers --->
                  USB Support --->

                  Compiling and Installing

                  Now that your kernel is configured, it is time to compile and install
                  it. Exit the configuration and start the compilation process:

                  Code Listing 12: Compiling the kernel

                  # make && make modules_install


                  When the kernel has finished compiling, copy the kernel image
                  to /boot. Use whatever name you feel is appropriate for your kernel
                  choice and remember it as you will need it later on when you
                  configure your bootloader. Remember to replace kernel-2.6.19-gentoo-
                  r5 with the name and version of your kernel.

                  Code Listing 13: Installing the kernel

                  # cp arch/x86_64/boot/bzImage /boot/kernel-2.6.19-gentoo-r5

                  Since I´m running Sabayon; but this is a gentoo based distribution.
                  Do you think it may work if I follow this steps listed above?

                  Thank you again.
                • Michael Sullivan
                  On Thu, 2007-09-20 at 13:25 +0000, dr_ovalle wrote: ... I don t see why it wouldn t work. I might suggest though, since you are a newbie,
                  Message 8 of 13 , Sep 20, 2007
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                    On Thu, 2007-09-20 at 13:25 +0000, dr_ovalle wrote:
                    <Majorly trimmed>
                    > Since I´m running Sabayon; but this is a gentoo based distribution.
                    > Do you think it may work if I follow this steps listed above?
                    >
                    > Thank you again.

                    I don't see why it wouldn't work. I might suggest though, since you are
                    a newbie, that you use genkernel. It's a lot less confusing.

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                  • Scott
                    ... Heh, I figured English was your first language. ... Ok, Michael has answered, and would definitely be a better source of information on this, as he s
                    Message 9 of 13 , Sep 20, 2007
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                      On Thu, Sep 20, 2007 at 01:25:10PM +0000, dr_ovalle wrote:
                      > Hi Scott, thank you for your answer.
                      >
                      > I consult information over the internet in three languages: Spanish
                      > (I´m mexican), English and French. I´ve studied English and French,
                      > but I never speak in those languages, I don´t have anyone to talk
                      > with.
                      >

                      Heh, I figured English was your first language.



                      > I have a question, maybe you could help. I´m consulting Gentoo Linux
                      > AMD64 Documentation (you´re right, there is plenty of information in
                      > there, and newbie-friendly), but it recommends to get the gentoo-
                      > sources to configure the kernel:
                      >

                      Ok, Michael has answered, and would definitely be a better source of
                      information on this, as he's apparently working with Gentoo
                      or Sabayon. A quick point of netiquette, when it's a long article like
                      that, you're probably better off just giving the link to the article
                      rather than posting the whole thing.

                      Keep us posted on your progress.


                      --
                      Scott Robbins
                      PGP keyID EB3467D6
                      ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
                      gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

                      Spike (watching, from a distance, a conversation between
                      Angel and a woman he just rescued):How can I thank you, you
                      mysterious black-clad-hunk-of-a-knight-thing?
                      No need little lady. Your tears of gratitude are enough for me. You
                      see, I was once a bad-ass vampire. But love, and a pesky curse,
                      defanged me. And now, I'm just a *big* fluffy puppy with bad teeth.
                      No! Not the hair! Never the hair.
                      But there must be some way I can show my appreciation.
                      No, helping those in need's my job. And working up a load of sexual
                      tension and prancing away like a magnificent poof is truly thanks
                      enough.
                      I understand. I have a nephew who's gay, so...
                      Say no more. Evil's still afoot. And I'm almost out of that Nancy-boy
                      hair gel I like so much. Quickly! To the Angel-mobile! Away!
                    • duckzlandd
                      ... distro ... internet ... I ... when ... is ... if its gentoo then you should try gentoo forum first. anyway if the main problem is emerging madwifi-ng: 1.
                      Message 10 of 13 , Sep 22, 2007
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                        --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, "dr_ovalle" <dr_ovalle@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > Thank you for your advise.
                        >
                        > I checked your page, and I think is very helpful for me. I am
                        > practicing those comands in the console mode, I hope not to mess
                        > anything.
                        >
                        > Unfortunately, there is no Unleashed book for Sabayon yet(the
                        distro
                        > I´m using), however, I think is a lot of fun learning in the
                        internet
                        > too.
                        >
                        > I am trying to resolve the problems in my laptop, I haven´t done it
                        > yet, but I am learning (fast I hope). I am consulting webpages in
                        > three languages and getting a lot of help from people like you, and
                        I
                        > see, there is plenty of information, but it is disperse, and its
                        > variable, depending on the distro you are using. However I´m doing
                        > things in the text mode, and suiting the commands for my distro
                        when
                        > the commands don´t work as advised.
                        >
                        > I met a guy who offered to fix the issues in my computer, but that
                        is
                        > not what I want. I want to do it myself.
                        >
                        > Thank you very much. I´ll read all that.
                        >

                        if its gentoo then you should try gentoo forum first.

                        anyway if the main problem is emerging madwifi-ng:

                        1. can you use ethernet cable to connect to internet and download
                        them in linux using wget?.
                        2. try to rename the blah.tar.tar to blah.tar.bz2 then test
                        extracting them. if failed, extract the original blah.tar.tar, then
                        repack them in tar then compressed them using bzip2. Once you got
                        good compressed tar.bz2 I think you need to move them
                        to /usr/portage/distfiles (or whatever link that sebayon / you
                        instructs in /etc/make.conf). then you need to issue the emerge
                        command again.

                        3. if there is madwifi ebuild available, you dont need to rebuild the
                        kernel. the ebuild will make the module for you.


                        hope this is helpful
                        duckz
                      • dr_ovalle
                        Thank you very much for you advise duckz. I already tryied gentoo forums. I also emerged the gentoo-sources and and used genkernel as Michael suggested, I
                        Message 11 of 13 , Sep 22, 2007
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                          Thank you very much for you advise duckz. I already tryied gentoo forums.

                          I also emerged the gentoo-sources and and used genkernel as Michael
                          suggested, I like very much how the Portage system works.

                          I discovered than Windows XP realize than tar.bz2 is a compressed
                          file, so it changes the extension to tar.tar, and is almost impossible
                          to decompress it. Ethernet just works for a few seconds in Sabayon
                          (at least in my laptop), so, I had to use an Ubuntu's LiveCD in my
                          wife's laptop so I could download the files with their original
                          extension. That was hard, because every time I tryied to emerge
                          something (wadwifi for example), Sabayon tryied to connect to download
                          a different file needed to emerge the program, each file I downloaded,
                          copyied to /usr/portage/distfiles (there were about 15 files), and I
                          was jumping between computers to do that. Finally, it didn't work
                          because, in order to make Sabayon to work in that laptop, in booting
                          options I had to add the commands "acpi=off doamp", and madwifi need
                          acpi enabled to work. The other issue is than Acer laptops need an
                          additional driver to work, to make its components "appear" in the
                          system, that driver is "acer_acpi"...the same steps to emerge it,
                          running between computers, and sadly, acer_acpi also needs acpi
                          enabled. I installed Ubuntu i386 in this laptop and Ethernet works.
                          But wireless don't work yet. Personally, I liked much more Sabayon.


                          > >
                          >
                          > if its gentoo then you should try gentoo forum first.
                          >
                          > anyway if the main problem is emerging madwifi-ng:
                          >
                          > 1. can you use ethernet cable to connect to internet and download
                          > them in linux using wget?.
                          > 2. try to rename the blah.tar.tar to blah.tar.bz2 then test
                          > extracting them. if failed, extract the original blah.tar.tar, then
                          > repack them in tar then compressed them using bzip2. Once you got
                          > good compressed tar.bz2 I think you need to move them
                          > to /usr/portage/distfiles (or whatever link that sebayon / you
                          > instructs in /etc/make.conf). then you need to issue the emerge
                          > command again.
                          >
                          > 3. if there is madwifi ebuild available, you dont need to rebuild the
                          > kernel. the ebuild will make the module for you.
                          >
                          >
                          > hope this is helpful
                          > duckz
                          >
                        • duckz quack
                          Well, after seeing your message, I think you should get the wired ethernet to work first, most wired internet driver is included in linux kernel. as for the
                          Message 12 of 13 , Sep 22, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Well, after seeing your message, I think you should get the wired ethernet to work first, most wired internet driver is included in linux kernel.

                            as for the acpi problem, usually after you got a working kernel, you will need to emerge acer-acpi. then emerge the wireless driver.

                            anyway, since you got ubuntu to get your wired working, do lspci and lsmod, get the result and takes note which kernel module should be loaded. then get the /proc/config.gz by zcat /proc/config.gz >> .config
                            and try to build the gentoo-sources with the same options as ubuntu.

                            Personally, I dont know how to use genkernel, usually i just go to /usr/src/linux

                            then make menuconfig, then make all then make modules_install then make install. then edit the /boot/grub.conf to point to the new vmlinuz.

                            i think you can also move the result of ubuntu zcat ...... to sebayon /usr/src/linux and try to make it if the kernel version is the same.

                            well good luck with sabayon... gentoo is a bitch to learn but once you master it you will KNOW what makes linux tick.

                            regards,
                            duckz


                            dr_ovalle <dr_ovalle@...> wrote: Thank you very much for you advise duckz. I already tryied gentoo forums.

                            I also emerged the gentoo-sources and and used genkernel as Michael
                            suggested, I like very much how the Portage system works.

                            I discovered than Windows XP realize than tar.bz2 is a compressed
                            file, so it changes the extension to tar.tar, and is almost impossible
                            to decompress it. Ethernet just works for a few seconds in Sabayon
                            (at least in my laptop), so, I had to use an Ubuntu's LiveCD in my
                            wife's laptop so I could download the files with their original
                            extension. That was hard, because every time I tryied to emerge
                            something (wadwifi for example), Sabayon tryied to connect to download
                            a different file needed to emerge the program, each file I downloaded,
                            copyied to /usr/portage/distfiles (there were about 15 files), and I
                            was jumping between computers to do that. Finally, it didn't work
                            because, in order to make Sabayon to work in that laptop, in booting
                            options I had to add the commands "acpi=off doamp", and madwifi need
                            acpi enabled to work. The other issue is than Acer laptops need an
                            additional driver to work, to make its components "appear" in the
                            system, that driver is "acer_acpi"...the same steps to emerge it,
                            running between computers, and sadly, acer_acpi also needs acpi
                            enabled. I installed Ubuntu i386 in this laptop and Ethernet works.
                            But wireless don't work yet. Personally, I liked much more Sabayon.

                            > >
                            >
                            > if its gentoo then you should try gentoo forum first.
                            >
                            > anyway if the main problem is emerging madwifi-ng:
                            >
                            > 1. can you use ethernet cable to connect to internet and download
                            > them in linux using wget?.
                            > 2. try to rename the blah.tar.tar to blah.tar.bz2 then test
                            > extracting them. if failed, extract the original blah.tar.tar, then
                            > repack them in tar then compressed them using bzip2. Once you got
                            > good compressed tar.bz2 I think you need to move them
                            > to /usr/portage/distfiles (or whatever link that sebayon / you
                            > instructs in /etc/make.conf). then you need to issue the emerge
                            > command again.
                            >
                            > 3. if there is madwifi ebuild available, you dont need to rebuild the
                            > kernel. the ebuild will make the module for you.
                            >
                            >
                            > hope this is helpful
                            > duckz
                            >






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