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Fedora 7 boots text only -- want GUI back!

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  • Gary
    Well, I did something stupid and utterly ruined my Fedora 7 upgrade over Core 3, sooooo, I did a fresh F7 install from scratch. The install process always
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 8, 2007
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      Well, I did something stupid and utterly ruined my Fedora 7 upgrade
      over Core 3, sooooo, I did a fresh F7 install from scratch.

      The install process always seems to have trouble with X server "can't
      find display :1" ; when installed over FC3, F7's first boot had to
      reconfigure the graphics from scratch. This is because my motherboard
      has an onboard VGA that I ignore in favor of a modestly superior PCI
      video card. No AGP slots on this motherboard.

      I don't understand why it can't find a GUI, I installed the packages
      for KDE and XFCE in addition to the default Gnome!!! And I don't know
      how to start any of them manually from the hostname login! At least
      with Windoze 3.1, you could just type "win" and it would start *grumble*

      Am I going to have to clear my hard drive again, install FC3 again,
      and install F7 over it just to get this to work?!
    • Robert C Wittig
      ... Try typing the command startx from the command prompt. It should start your graphical X-Windows platform, and from there, whichever Desktop Manager is
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 9, 2007
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        Gary wrote:
        > Well, I did something stupid and utterly ruined my Fedora 7 upgrade
        > over Core 3, sooooo, I did a fresh F7 install from scratch.
        >
        > The install process always seems to have trouble with X server "can't
        > find display :1" ; when installed over FC3, F7's first boot had to
        > reconfigure the graphics from scratch. This is because my motherboard
        > has an onboard VGA that I ignore in favor of a modestly superior PCI
        > video card. No AGP slots on this motherboard.
        >
        > I don't understand why it can't find a GUI, I installed the packages
        > for KDE and XFCE in addition to the default Gnome!!! And I don't know
        > how to start any of them manually from the hostname login! At least
        > with Windoze 3.1, you could just type "win" and it would start *grumble*
        >
        > Am I going to have to clear my hard drive again, install FC3 again,
        > and install F7 over it just to get this to work?!
        >
        >

        Try typing the command 'startx' from the command prompt. It should
        start your graphical X-Windows platform, and from there, whichever
        Desktop Manager is default.

        I never set a machine to boot directly into X-Windows. Back when I
        started using *nix (in 2000), X-Windows was pretty 'iffy', and the
        getty console was (and still is) a much more stable way to work.

        If you ever have a serious problem with X-Windows, you might be happy
        that you are able to just boot into the graphical prompt, and fix the
        problem manually.


        --
        -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
        http://robertwittig.net/
        http://robertwittig.org/
        .
      • Gary
        ... Good advice, but regrettably I read it a little too late -- already reinstalled from scratch. Maybe it will save someone else some time, though. The issue
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 11, 2007
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          --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, Robert C Wittig
          <wittig.robert@...> wrote:
          >
          > Gary wrote:
          > > Well, I did something stupid and utterly ruined my Fedora 7 upgrade
          > > over Core 3, sooooo, I did a fresh F7 install from scratch.
          > >
          > > The install process always seems to have trouble with X server "can't
          > > find display :1" ; when installed over FC3, F7's first boot had to
          > > reconfigure the graphics from scratch. This is because my motherboard
          > > has an onboard VGA that I ignore in favor of a modestly superior PCI
          > > video card.
          > >
          > > I don't understand why it can't find a GUI, I installed the packages
          > > for KDE and XFCE in addition to the default Gnome!!! And I don't know
          > > how to start any of them manually from the hostname login!

          > Try typing the command 'startx' from the command prompt. It should
          > start your graphical X-Windows platform, and from there, whichever
          > Desktop Manager is default.
          >
          > If you ever have a serious problem with X-Windows, you might be happy
          > that you are able to just boot into the graphical prompt, and fix the
          > problem manually.
          >

          Good advice, but regrettably I read it a little too late -- already
          reinstalled from scratch. Maybe it will save someone else some time,
          though.

          The issue was that F7's install process was in fact keying off of the
          FIRST video adapter it found -- the motherboard's -- rather than the
          one specified as preferred in BIOS -- the PCI card. That's why --
          when it showed any video at all -- it couldn't start the X server
          without having to *immediately* reconfigure from scratch.

          Fedora Core 3 went directly to the BIOS-preferred adapter.

          Once F7 sucessfully installed, everything was fine. I thought about
          running the F7 install as dual-head (which F7 supports), but ended up
          removing the PCI card altogether; curiously (and wonderfully!) the
          onboard video adapter is behaving better under Fedora than it was
          under Win98, thus obviating the need for the PCI adapter.

          Oh, the 'stupid' thing I did? Having an ext2-formatted zipdisk in the
          drive when I did the F7 install. Which was not bad in and of itself,
          but led me to make some bad decisions.

          Under Fedora Core 3, my onboard IDE HD was /dev/hda, and my PCI-card
          SCSI-controler zipdrive was /dev/sda4. Somehow, under F7, the IDE
          drive became "/sda" and my zipdrive became "/sdb". I didn't realize
          it had changed that way! So, when the install asked me what drive I
          wanted to use, I told it /sdb because I 'knew' that /sda was my
          zip100, and I didn't want that! :-/

          So, now my zip100 was *intimately* involved in system operations,
          being the repository of /boot, /proc, and several other critical
          partitions. As such, it was being accessed frequently, even though I
          *thought* I wasn't doing anything with it, and COULD NOT be ejected,
          which I was extremely suspicious of.

          Now we're getting to the actual mistake(s) I made: (1) I thought that
          the zip100 disk had gotten messed up somehow. (2) To clean it up and
          start over, I issued "su -c mke2fs -F /dev/sda". Note the -F "force"
          parameter...

          Well, you can guess what effect THAT had! :facepalms:

          But, I'm good now. Everything's up and running. I *like* F7!!!
        • Robert C Wittig
          ... If you check the mainboard s manual, you might discover that there is a jumper on the board for disabling the on-board video chip, if you plan on
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 11, 2007
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            Gary wrote:

            > The issue was that F7's install process was in fact keying off of the
            > FIRST video adapter it found -- the motherboard's -- rather than the
            > one specified as preferred in BIOS -- the PCI card. That's why --
            > when it showed any video at all -- it couldn't start the X server
            > without having to *immediately* reconfigure from scratch.
            >

            If you check the mainboard's manual, you might discover that there is
            a jumper on the board for disabling the on-board video chip, if you
            plan on installing a PCI/AGP video card.

            > So, now my zip100 was *intimately* involved in system operations,
            > being the repository of /boot, /proc, and several other critical
            > partitions. As such, it was being accessed frequently, even though I
            > *thought* I wasn't doing anything with it, and COULD NOT be ejected,
            > which I was extremely suspicious of.
            >

            I build a lot of machines, so I have developed a fairly cautions 'less
            is more' philosophy, for installing OS... adding extra HD's, tape
            drives and other peripheral devices *after* the OS slice has been set,
            partitioned, and the OS files copied, unzipped, and final
            configurations of the base install completed.

            Then, after everything has been checked and rechecked, and run for a
            few days to burn-in the hardware, I start customising things, and
            installing apps.

            The fewer variables, the less chance there is, for me to screw
            something up!<g>

            I'm currently working on a nice little OpenBSD Desktop machine, for
            myself, using an old PII Dell Dimension Tower, that I stuffed 192 MB
            RAM and a 20 Gig HD into.

            With an old 8 MB Video card, I have a HUGE screen res (1200 by 1600),
            and am using FVWM for my X-Windows 'desktop' ... no fancy bells and
            whistles... and with just Firefox installed at the moment, it runs
            like a rocket.

            By the time I am done writing a good .fvwmrc file, to suit my needs, I
            will have a lot of hours in on the job, so I am filling up a spiral
            notebook, to have a good record of what I am doing.

            I will also email the config files to my Red Hat machine, as they are
            finalised.

            I, like you, make a respectable number of mistakes, installing and
            customising an OS. I do not want to lose any of 'the good stuff', if
            the HD dies, or I have to do a forced total re-install, after spending
            a lot of hours getting a good set of config files in shape.

            Over the course of hundreds of installs, my pile of spiral notebooks
            have probably save the thousands of hours, not having to redesign the
            wheel, again, and again, and again.



            --
            -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
            http://robertwittig.net/
            http://robertwittig.org/
            .
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