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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Starting from scratch

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  • Ron Osborne
    One good source for Linux programs and distros is a magazine called Linux Format. It has about a $15 price tag, but it comes with a DVD which usually have
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 30, 2006
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      One good source for Linux programs and distros is a magazine called Linux Format. It has about a $15 price tag, but it comes with a DVD which usually have different distros and other programs on it. It may have one distro which can be used directly from the DVD as either a Live DVD or as an install disk. It, also, has a number of ISO files already on it; so, if you don't have broadband, you won't have to spend a couple of hours on a download. It, also, has very good articles, but since it is a British magazine, you will have to contend with British English.

      Ron

      Chad Martin <chad@...> wrote:
      martintrucco@... wrote:
      > 1- Would it be advisable to turn to Linux?

      Always. I mean, yeah, you're computer will be slow, but there's not a
      whole lot that can be done about that. All in all, Linux is more secure
      and cheaper, if nothing else.

      > 2- Reasons?

      As I mentioned, the big ones are security and price. There's also a
      wide variety of software out there. You're not going to find a lot of
      games, but there's a variety of other software available. Another big
      factor is choice. There are a lot of choices available to you that your
      average Windows user wouldn't know about. This could be a good thing or
      a bad thing, depending on how you look at it.

      > 3- How should I do so?

      Download a distro and try it out. Most install quite easily. Fedora,
      Ubuntu and SuSE are quite good, though SuSE isn't free, as I understand
      it. If you're willing to just blow away your Windows installation,
      there really shouldn't be much in your way. Just be prepared to read
      documentation.

      > 4- Should I expect a steep learning curve?

      There are things to unlearn from using Windows. Just keep an open mind
      and be willing to read and ask specific questions. If you start with
      installing a distro that runs GNOME or KDE, it should ease your transition.

      > 5- If I just use my computer to type things, use home Excel sheets, send and receive e-mails with Outlook, browse the web with Firefox, and not much more: What should I expect to improve with Linux?

      Improve? Certainly, you'll be able to continue to do these things, but
      with different programs. OpenOffice is quite good with compatibility
      with Office formats. Firefox is available for Linux. There are many
      mail clients from Thunderbird to Evolution. It isn't possible to run
      Windows programs natively in Linux, and the Windows emulators for Linux
      aren't perfect, but there are often equivalent programs to use in Linux.

      > 6- Which of the distros is best suited for old and very limited computers? I should also tell you that I am "old and limited" being almost forty YO.

      It's hard to get a distro that's lean and user-friendly. I mean,
      graphical interfaces come at a performance price. I would start with
      one of the distros I mentioned above and just install a basic set of
      programs. You can always add more later if you have space. You might
      also want to poke around distrowatch.com for further ideas.

      Chad Martin






      "The service we render to others is really the rent we pay for our room on this earth."
      --Wilfred Grenfell

      ---------------------------------
      Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1¢/min.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ResedaNights
      I agree with you. This is true for a couple of other Linux magazines. My only problem with them is that it applies only to those trying to install a distro
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 30, 2006
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        I agree with you. This is true for a couple of other Linux magazines. My only problem with them is that it applies only to those trying to install a distro to a Windows OS computer. They have completely ignored those wanting to install a Linux distro to a Mac OS computer. To get a LInux distro for a Mac OS computer, one must still go to a Linux website and attempt a download. I have after 4 months still been unsuccessful in getting any distro to load on a Mac system. I have installed SuSe and Ubuntu on WIndows PC's with the DVD's obtained from Linux magazines. I am still waiting for the day one of these magazines offers a DVD or CD for a distro installation for Mac systems.

        Ron Tate

        Ron Osborne <majorridge67@...> wrote:
        One good source for Linux programs and distros is a magazine called Linux Format. It has about a $15 price tag, but it comes with a DVD which usually have different distros and other programs on it. It may have one distro which can be used directly from the DVD as either a Live DVD or as an install disk. It, also, has a number of ISO files already on it; so, if you don't have broadband, you won't have to spend a couple of hours on a download. It, also, has very good articles, but since it is a British magazine, you will have to contend with British English.

        Ron

        Chad Martin <chad@...> wrote:
        martintrucco@... wrote:
        > 1- Would it be advisable to turn to Linux?

        Always. I mean, yeah, you're computer will be slow, but there's not a
        whole lot that can be done about that. All in all, Linux is more secure
        and cheaper, if nothing else.

        > 2- Reasons?

        As I mentioned, the big ones are security and price. There's also a
        wide variety of software out there. You're not going to find a lot of
        games, but there's a variety of other software available. Another big
        factor is choice. There are a lot of choices available to you that your
        average Windows user wouldn't know about. This could be a good thing or
        a bad thing, depending on how you look at it.

        > 3- How should I do so?

        Download a distro and try it out. Most install quite easily. Fedora,
        Ubuntu and SuSE are quite good, though SuSE isn't free, as I understand
        it. If you're willing to just blow away your Windows installation,
        there really shouldn't be much in your way. Just be prepared to read
        documentation.

        > 4- Should I expect a steep learning curve?

        There are things to unlearn from using Windows. Just keep an open mind
        and be willing to read and ask specific questions. If you start with
        installing a distro that runs GNOME or KDE, it should ease your transition.

        > 5- If I just use my computer to type things, use home Excel sheets, send and receive e-mails with Outlook, browse the web with Firefox, and not much more: What should I expect to improve with Linux?

        Improve? Certainly, you'll be able to continue to do these things, but
        with different programs. OpenOffice is quite good with compatibility
        with Office formats. Firefox is available for Linux. There are many
        mail clients from Thunderbird to Evolution. It isn't possible to run
        Windows programs natively in Linux, and the Windows emulators for Linux
        aren't perfect, but there are often equivalent programs to use in Linux.

        > 6- Which of the distros is best suited for old and very limited computers? I should also tell you that I am "old and limited" being almost forty YO.

        It's hard to get a distro that's lean and user-friendly. I mean,
        graphical interfaces come at a performance price. I would start with
        one of the distros I mentioned above and just install a basic set of
        programs. You can always add more later if you have space. You might
        also want to poke around distrowatch.com for further ideas.

        Chad Martin

        "The service we render to others is really the rent we pay for our room on this earth."
        --Wilfred Grenfell

        ---------------------------------
        Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1¢/min.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • dmyers549
        Go to Ubuntu s wesite and request free installation CDs for Mac (PPC). They won t even charge you shipping! You can also get a ton of linux programs for Mac OS
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 2, 2006
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          Go to Ubuntu's wesite and request free installation CDs for Mac
          (PPC). They won't even charge you shipping! You can also get a ton of
          linux programs for Mac OS X very easily. The only real reason to
          shell out extra $$$ for a Mac is to run their OS, anyway. If you want
          to run Linux, just buy an inexpensive x86 machine.
          -Darrin-

          --- In LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com, ResedaNights <resedanights@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I agree with you. This is true for a couple of other Linux
          magazines. My only problem with them is that it applies only to
          those trying to install a distro to a Windows OS computer. They have
          completely ignored those wanting to install a Linux distro to a Mac
          OS computer. To get a LInux distro for a Mac OS computer, one must
          still go to a Linux website and attempt a download. I have after 4
          months still been unsuccessful in getting any distro to load on a Mac
          system. I have installed SuSe and Ubuntu on WIndows PC's with the
          DVD's obtained from Linux magazines. I am still waiting for the day
          one of these magazines offers a DVD or CD for a distro installation
          for Mac systems.
          >
          > Ron Tate
          >
          > Ron Osborne <majorridge67@...> wrote:
          > One good source for Linux programs and distros is a
          magazine called Linux Format. It has about a $15 price tag, but it
          comes with a DVD which usually have different distros and other
          programs on it. It may have one distro which can be used directly
          from the DVD as either a Live DVD or as an install disk. It, also,
          has a number of ISO files already on it; so, if you don't have
          broadband, you won't have to spend a couple of hours on a download.
          It, also, has very good articles, but since it is a British magazine,
          you will have to contend with British English.
          >
          > Ron
          >
          > Chad Martin <chad@...> wrote:
          > martintrucco@... wrote:
          > > 1- Would it be advisable to turn to Linux?
          >
          > Always. I mean, yeah, you're computer will be slow, but there's not
          a
          > whole lot that can be done about that. All in all, Linux is more
          secure
          > and cheaper, if nothing else.
          >
          > > 2- Reasons?
          >
          > As I mentioned, the big ones are security and price. There's also a
          > wide variety of software out there. You're not going to find a lot
          of
          > games, but there's a variety of other software available. Another
          big
          > factor is choice. There are a lot of choices available to you that
          your
          > average Windows user wouldn't know about. This could be a good
          thing or
          > a bad thing, depending on how you look at it.
          >
          > > 3- How should I do so?
          >
          > Download a distro and try it out. Most install quite easily. Fedora,
          > Ubuntu and SuSE are quite good, though SuSE isn't free, as I
          understand
          > it. If you're willing to just blow away your Windows installation,
          > there really shouldn't be much in your way. Just be prepared to read
          > documentation.
          >
          > > 4- Should I expect a steep learning curve?
          >
          > There are things to unlearn from using Windows. Just keep an open
          mind
          > and be willing to read and ask specific questions. If you start with
          > installing a distro that runs GNOME or KDE, it should ease your
          transition.
          >
          > > 5- If I just use my computer to type things, use home Excel
          sheets, send and receive e-mails with Outlook, browse the web with
          Firefox, and not much more: What should I expect to improve with
          Linux?
          >
          > Improve? Certainly, you'll be able to continue to do these things,
          but
          > with different programs. OpenOffice is quite good with compatibility
          > with Office formats. Firefox is available for Linux. There are many
          > mail clients from Thunderbird to Evolution. It isn't possible to run
          > Windows programs natively in Linux, and the Windows emulators for
          Linux
          > aren't perfect, but there are often equivalent programs to use in
          Linux.
          >
          > > 6- Which of the distros is best suited for old and very limited
          computers? I should also tell you that I am "old and limited" being
          almost forty YO.
          >
          > It's hard to get a distro that's lean and user-friendly. I mean,
          > graphical interfaces come at a performance price. I would start with
          > one of the distros I mentioned above and just install a basic set of
          > programs. You can always add more later if you have space. You might
          > also want to poke around distrowatch.com for further ideas.
          >
          > Chad Martin
          >
          > "The service we render to others is really the rent we pay for our
          room on this earth."
          > --Wilfred Grenfell
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls.
          Great rates starting at 1¢/min.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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