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Debian - How to load a GUI - or is one even installed?

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  • Norm Higgs
    I downloaded Debian and installed it a few days ago. I boots to a command prompt and I can log in with my username and password, but how do I load up a GUI
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 29, 2006
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      I downloaded Debian and installed it a few days ago. I boots to
      a command prompt and I can log in with my username and password,
      but how do I load up a GUI such as Gnome? I went all through the
      installation instructions on the website, but can't seem to grok this out.

      Debian was recommended for an application I'd like to use.

      Norm
    • Brad Rogers
      On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 03:04:13 -0700 Norm Higgs wrote: Hello Norm, ... During installation, when it comes to selecting packages for
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 29, 2006
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        On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 03:04:13 -0700
        "Norm Higgs" <norm@...> wrote:

        Hello Norm,

        > I downloaded Debian and installed it a few days ago. I boots to
        > a command prompt and I can log in with my username and password,
        > but how do I load up a GUI such as Gnome? I went all through the

        During installation, when it comes to selecting packages for
        installation, Debian has the GUI selection highlighted. However, they
        are *not* selected by default, you need to click on them so that an X
        appears at the left of the list.

        If gdm, kdm or similar don't exist on your system, Gnome and/or KDE
        were not installed. In which case, you'll have to install.

        --
        Regards _
        / ) "The blindingly obvious is
        / _)rad never immediately apparent"

        Only the wounded remain, the generals have all left the game
        Generals - The Damned
      • Norm Higgs
        I just selected the desktop configuration. ... From: Brad Rogers To: Sent: Saturday, July 29, 2006 6:01
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 29, 2006
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          I just selected the desktop configuration.
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Brad Rogers" <brad@...>
          To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, July 29, 2006 6:01 AM
          Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Debian - How to load a GUI - or is one even
          installed?


          > On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 03:04:13 -0700
          > "Norm Higgs" <norm@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Norm,
          >
          > > I downloaded Debian and installed it a few days ago. I boots to
          > > a command prompt and I can log in with my username and password,
          > > but how do I load up a GUI such as Gnome? I went all through the
          >
          > During installation, when it comes to selecting packages for
          > installation, Debian has the GUI selection highlighted. However, they
          > are *not* selected by default, you need to click on them so that an X
          > appears at the left of the list.
          >
          > If gdm, kdm or similar don't exist on your system, Gnome and/or KDE
          > were not installed. In which case, you'll have to install.

          I just selected the desktop configuration. Didn't see any selections for
          packages.

          Anyway, I loaded Fedora Core 3 on it instead, since that ones a little
          easier
          to work with, me being an ultra noob and all. I've installed the sound and
          network
          drivers from Nvidia, but I have not figured out how to configure them. The
          sound
          is not critical, but this box will need network access. Its a Nforce 4
          chipset MoBo
          made by BioStar. It uses a Realtek 8201BL PHY Network Adaptor.

          If anyone can clue me in on how to set up this NIC, pleas let me know.

          Norm Higgs
          http://computers.forbiddenjoy.com
          https://www.linkedin.com/e/fpf/4018099
        • Norm Higgs
          ... From: Norm Higgs To: Sent: Saturday, July 29, 2006 4:23 PM Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Debian -
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 30, 2006
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Norm Higgs" <norm@...>
            To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, July 29, 2006 4:23 PM
            Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Debian - How to load a GUI - or is one even
            installed?

            > > Hello Norm,
            > >
            > > > I downloaded Debian and installed it a few days ago. I boots to
            > > > a command prompt and I can log in with my username and password,
            > > > but how do I load up a GUI such as Gnome? I went all through the
            > >
            > > During installation, when it comes to selecting packages for
            > > installation, Debian has the GUI selection highlighted. However, they
            > > are *not* selected by default, you need to click on them so that an X
            > > appears at the left of the list.
            > >
            > > If gdm, kdm or similar don't exist on your system, Gnome and/or KDE
            > > were not installed. In which case, you'll have to install.
            >
            > I just selected the desktop configuration. Didn't see any selections for
            > packages.
            >
            > Anyway, I loaded Fedora Core 3 on it instead, since that ones a little
            > easier
            > to work with, me being an ultra noob and all. I've installed the sound and
            > network
            > drivers from Nvidia, but I have not figured out how to configure them. The
            > sound
            > is not critical, but this box will need network access. Its a Nforce 4
            > chipset MoBo
            > made by BioStar. It uses a Realtek 8201BL PHY Network Adaptor.
            >
            > If anyone can clue me in on how to set up this NIC, pleas let me know.
            >

            OK, I'm stupid. Rebooting got the NIC to show up so I can configure it
            now BUT - it seems to have lost my user ID and password! I can log in
            as root just fine, but I can't log in under my username. How can I make a
            new Username and password. I'm not going to configure this thing while
            running as Root since I'm on always on DSL....

            Norm Higgs
            http://computers.forbiddenjoy.com
            https://www.linkedin.com/e/fpf/4018099
          • Chad Martin
            ... Open up a command line and type: passwd Assuming that the username exists, you ll be able to change the password. Note that only root can
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 30, 2006
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              Norm Higgs wrote:
              > OK, I'm stupid. Rebooting got the NIC to show up so I can configure it
              > now BUT - it seems to have lost my user ID and password! I can log in
              > as root just fine, but I can't log in under my username. How can I make a
              > new Username and password. I'm not going to configure this thing while
              > running as Root since I'm on always on DSL....

              Open up a command line and type:

              passwd <your username>

              Assuming that the username exists, you'll be able to change the
              password. Note that only root can change other users' passwords.

              Chad Martin
            • Felix Gomez
              Hi, I have a computer unit with 3 partitions (38G divided equally) Windows 98 SE was installed in the first partition while Windows XP Profession was in the
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 30, 2006
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                Hi,

                I have a computer unit with 3 partitions (38G divided
                equally)

                Windows 98 SE was installed in the first partition
                while Windows XP Profession was in the second
                partition.

                During the fdisk, I left the 3rd partition untouched
                for the Slackware.

                Now, may I ask how I can install slackware since I
                thought it would be the same with Redhat but then it
                is not.

                I appreciate if anyone could extend a help on this
                matter. Thank you.

                __________________________________________________
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              • Chad Martin
                ... What are you asking? How to install Slackware? There s webpages for this sort of thing. Are you asking how to setup the bootloader to recognize 98, XP
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 30, 2006
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                  Felix Gomez wrote:
                  > Now, may I ask how I can install slackware since I
                  > thought it would be the same with Redhat but then it
                  > is not.

                  What are you asking? How to install Slackware? There's webpages for
                  this sort of thing. Are you asking how to setup the bootloader to
                  recognize 98, XP and Slack? Specifically, what are you asking for?

                  Chad Martin
                • Felix Gomez
                  Hi, My inquiry seemed vague, im sorry for that. I am asking how I can install (step-by-step) my Slackware 10.2 in the computer where there is already a dual
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 30, 2006
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                    Hi,

                    My inquiry seemed vague, im sorry for that.

                    I am asking how I can install (step-by-step) my
                    Slackware 10.2 in the computer where there is already
                    a dual boot (98 and XP professional). I have 1
                    partition reserved for the linux. I just made it using
                    fdisk.

                    Thanks a lot

                    __________________________________________________
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                    Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                    http://mail.yahoo.com
                  • Felix Gomez
                    Hi, My inquiry seemed vague, im sorry for that. I am asking how I can install (step-by-step) my Slackware 10.2 in the computer where there is already a dual
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 30, 2006
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                      Hi,

                      My inquiry seemed vague, im sorry for that.

                      I am asking how I can install (step-by-step) my
                      Slackware 10.2 in the computer where there is already
                      a dual boot (98 and XP professional). I have 1
                      partition reserved for the linux. I just made it using
                      fdisk.

                      Thanks a lot

                      __________________________________________________
                      Do You Yahoo!?
                      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                      http://mail.yahoo.com
                    • Chad Martin
                      ... This is why I asked. We get a lot of questions on this list for step-by-step instructions on how to do this or that. In my 6 or so years on this list
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 30, 2006
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                        Felix Gomez wrote:
                        > My inquiry seemed vague, im sorry for that.
                        >
                        > I am asking how I can install (step-by-step) my
                        > Slackware 10.2 in the computer where there is already
                        > a dual boot (98 and XP professional). I have 1
                        > partition reserved for the linux. I just made it using
                        > fdisk.

                        This is why I asked. We get a lot of questions on this list for
                        step-by-step instructions on how to do this or that. In my 6 or so
                        years on this list (and Scott and Cameron have been here longer), I
                        don't think I've seen a single one of these questions answered as requested.

                        It's really time consuming to write an installation guide whenever one
                        is requested, so we don't do it. For instance, Gentoo's installation
                        guide is something like 30 printed pages long. I looked at the
                        Slackware website for installation instructions, and it seems that they
                        feel that the process is trivial. If you feel otherwise, you may want
                        to run a Google search for "Slackware installation guide" or something
                        similar. You'll probably get a better answer than we would give here.

                        Chad Martin
                      • Robert C Wittig
                        ... 1) Clone your hard drive, so if you trash anything, you will have a working replacement of what you lost. 2) Take the question you asked here, and reduce
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 31, 2006
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                          Felix Gomez wrote:

                          > I am asking how I can install (step-by-step) my
                          > Slackware 10.2 in the computer where there is already
                          > a dual boot (98 and XP professional). I have 1
                          > partition reserved for the linux. I just made it using
                          > fdisk.

                          1) Clone your hard drive, so if you trash anything, you will have a
                          working replacement of what you lost.

                          2) Take the question you asked here, and reduce it to a good set of
                          keywords, and submit it to Google, and start reading.

                          3) Continue reading, until you have amassed enough knowledge, so that
                          you feel ready to give it a try.

                          4) Try it, and see what happens, making sure to keep a meticulously
                          accurate record of absolutely everything you have done.

                          My guess, is that GRUB or LILO will detect all three operating systems
                          without any problem, but that is just a guess.

                          5) If the shit hits the fan, you will then have a spare HD, ready to pop
                          into your machine with no annoying downtime, and a precise description
                          of what you did, to begin you analysis, and preparations for try number two.

                          As Chad already pointed out to you, requesting step-by-step tutorials be
                          presented to you is a poor strategy, because:

                          1) you will be ignored, or

                          2) people will pick on you for being so naive, but most important,

                          3) you will not learn the analytical thinking skills that *nix demands
                          of its users, by being spoon-fed step-by-step sets of instructions, that
                          you follow, without understanding at all, why they actually work.


                          Also... In my opinion, multiple boot machines are an unnecessary pain.
                          If anything ever goes wrong with one of the operating systems you have
                          in a multiple boot array, and you need to re-install the OS, you might
                          encounter some tricky MBR problems, after the re-install.

                          Instead, I purchased, for under $10.00 USD each on eBay, a pile of
                          front-loading 5.25" drive trays. I installed receptacles in the
                          computer... one for each place I wanted to plug a hard drive (only one
                          is necessary for multiple OS's), and then I mounted the hard drives into
                          trays that just plug right into the receptacles.

                          Then I picked up a small pile of not very large HD's for the OS's,
                          placed them in the trays, and installed a single OS on each hard drive,
                          so that now, when I want to change OS's, I just shut down the computer,
                          plug in the tray with the OS I want to run, and restart the computer.

                          My data remains on a separate hard drive... one that has partitions that
                          are readable and mountable by all the OS's I plan on using in the
                          computer, so that I am able to work on the same dataset regardless of
                          which OS I have plugged in.

                          This is, in my opinion, a far superior solution, for those people who
                          want to run multiple OS's on a single machine. It is also fairly
                          economical, and does not eat up a lot of space.



                          --
                          -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
                          . http://robertwittig.net/
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