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  • Norm Higgs
    Hello everyone. Just wanted to introduce myself, I m Norm and I want to learn Linux! I already have Fedora Core 3 installed on my Windows box and when I get
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 1, 2005
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      Hello everyone. Just wanted to introduce myself, I'm Norm and I want to
      learn Linux! I already have Fedora Core 3 installed on my Windows box and
      when I get time I will statrt messing around with it. My ultimate goal is to
      add several more Linux boxes to my network to use as web and mail servers,
      and one to serve as a hardware firewall. I'm behind a D-link network switch
      right now - I know, terribly unsecure, but I didn't know squat back then.

      I'm sure I will have lots of dumb quetions to ask, but I'll do my best to
      figure it out myself before asking, I promise.

      Norm
    • Robert C Wittig
      ... Hmmmm... a familiar name.... are you the Norm Higgs on the 1PCBuilder list? Welcome to the list. As to not knowing squat ... the more I learn, the more I
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 2, 2005
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        Norm Higgs wrote:
        > Hello everyone. Just wanted to introduce myself, I'm Norm and I want to
        > learn Linux! I already have Fedora Core 3 installed on my Windows box and
        > when I get time I will statrt messing around with it. My ultimate goal is to
        > add several more Linux boxes to my network to use as web and mail servers,
        > and one to serve as a hardware firewall. I'm behind a D-link network switch
        > right now - I know, terribly unsecure, but I didn't know squat back then.

        Hmmmm... a familiar name.... are you the Norm Higgs on the 1PCBuilder list?

        Welcome to the list. As to 'not knowing squat'... the more I learn, the
        more I realise how little I actually know.<g>

        I have been using Linux Red Hat for several years, now (since Red Hat 7
        ...currently running RH Enterprise 3) and also have two Win2k Pro
        workstations on my mini-LAN, behind the RH Internet-connected machine's
        firewall. This is more secure than having each machine connected to the
        Internet router, unless you have a firewall in the router.

        At the moment, I am using a dial-up modem, but next week I will be
        getting a DSL connection, and plan on connecting the DSL modem to a
        'NETGEAR RP614 4-Port Cable /DSL Network Firewall Router', and from
        there, to my various computers, once I am sure its firewall is doing its
        job properly.

        > I'm sure I will have lots of dumb quetions to ask, but I'll do my best to
        > figure it out myself before asking, I promise.

        Make sure to visit the List FAQ at:

        http://home.nyc.rr.com/computertaijutsu/linfaq.html

        ...to see if the answer you seek is there, and to consult the man pages
        in your Linux installation before posting a question. Google is also
        your friend.

        Also, if you figure out the answer to a question you had, all on your
        own, it is a good idea to post your discovery here, because this is a
        newbie list, and there is a good chance that if you were puzzled, so
        might other list members, newbies themselves... be in need of your
        discovery.


        --
        -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
        .
      • Davey Brain
        ... Hi Norm, Welcome. I m an old OS/2 user (just checked, I still am...) but I m learning more about Linux as I look to the future. I have found this list of
        Message 3 of 20 , Aug 2, 2005
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          Norm Higgs wrote:
          >
          >Hello everyone. Just wanted to introduce myself, I'm Norm and I want to
          >learn Linux! I already have Fedora Core 3 installed on my Windows box and
          >when I get time I will statrt messing around with it. My ultimate goal is to
          >add several more Linux boxes to my network to use as web and mail servers,
          >and one to serve as a hardware firewall. I'm behind a D-link network switch
          >right now - I know, terribly unsecure, but I didn't know squat back then.
          >

          Hi Norm,
          Welcome. I'm an old OS/2 user (just checked, I still am...) but I'm
          learning more about Linux as I look to the future. I have found this
          list of links extremely useful: "Linux Links for the Newbie"
          <http://www.code7r.org/jrg/linux/linuxlinks1.htm>

          I also pick up books on older versions of Linux for almost nothing. I
          just bought a brand new O'Reilly book "Learning Redhat Linux" (3rd
          edition Redhat V8) for $2.99 brand new with the CDs. Some info is
          outdated but much of it still applies, especially when it comes to using
          the console (command line). I used to use Redhat exclusively but now use
          mostly SuSE 9 Pro. Lately I have been playing with Ubuntu (nice &
          simple) and Linspire (too Win-like IMHO). Right now I'm trying to figure
          out how to cut-up the hard drive (resize and add partitions) on my HP
          laptop to put Ubuntu on it in a multi-boot situation.

          I'd have to say that learning about Linux isn't any harder than learning
          OS/2 but after 14 years using OS/2 I know so much about it that it is
          like second nature to me. I try to think back to 1991 and struggling
          with OS/2 after using MS-DOS (and that was without much online info).
          With the Internet and the WWW there is a wealth of info to learn this
          fascinating op sys.

          Back to lurk mode now...
          WarpDavey
          --
          Davey Brain
          Due to political oppression I'm seeking a Canadian or European
          spouse...any takers?

          "It is dangerous to be right when the established authorities are wrong"
          - Voltaire

          This OS/2 uptime is 6 d 12 h 15 m 03 seconds
        • Robert C Wittig
          ... Nice page... thanks! -- -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/ .
          Message 4 of 20 , Aug 2, 2005
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            Davey Brain wrote:

            > <http://www.code7r.org/jrg/linux/linuxlinks1.htm>

            Nice page... thanks!

            --
            -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
            .
          • Norm Higgs
            ... From: Robert C Wittig To: Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 4:20 AM Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies]
            Message 5 of 20 , Aug 2, 2005
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              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Robert C Wittig" <wittig@...>
              To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 4:20 AM
              Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New member




              > Hmmmm... a familiar name.... are you the Norm Higgs on the 1PCBuilder
              list?

              Yep, that would be me!

              > Welcome to the list. As to 'not knowing squat'... the more I learn, the
              > more I realise how little I actually know.<g>

              LOL - same here!

              > I have been using Linux Red Hat for several years, now (since Red Hat 7
              > ...currently running RH Enterprise 3) and also have two Win2k Pro
              > workstations on my mini-LAN, behind the RH Internet-connected machine's
              > firewall. This is more secure than having each machine connected to the
              > Internet router, unless you have a firewall in the router.
              >
              > At the moment, I am using a dial-up modem, but next week I will be
              > getting a DSL connection, and plan on connecting the DSL modem to a
              > 'NETGEAR RP614 4-Port Cable /DSL Network Firewall Router', and from
              > there, to my various computers, once I am sure its firewall is doing its
              > job properly.

              I've been rather undecided on whether to just buy a commmercial
              router/firewall, or put together an older pentuim pc and put smoothwall or
              some other 'nix based router/firewall.

              > > I'm sure I will have lots of dumb quetions to ask, but I'll do my best
              to
              > > figure it out myself before asking, I promise.
              >
              > Make sure to visit the List FAQ at:

              Been all through it already.

              > http://home.nyc.rr.com/computertaijutsu/linfaq.html
              >
              > ...to see if the answer you seek is there, and to consult the man pages
              > in your Linux installation before posting a question. Google is also
              > your friend.

              LOL - I have no clue how to consult my man pages! I saw that mentioned many
              times but nothing to clue me into how to do it. I didn't even know there
              were any man pages.

              > Also, if you figure out the answer to a question you had, all on your
              > own, it is a good idea to post your discovery here, because this is a
              > newbie list, and there is a good chance that if you were puzzled, so
              > might other list members, newbies themselves... be in need of your
              > discovery.

              The main thing I've been looking for is the network driver. I found
              references for where to find it in the 2.4 kernel:

              "For Linux kernel-2.4, IP100 driver can be found and initiailized by a
              compatible
              Fast Ethernet driver "sundance.o" under the net module directory. Its source
              code is under /usr/src/linux2.4/drivers/net directory."

              But I have the 2.6 kernel and there is no directories listed under /usr/src,
              and a file search for sundance.o turns up nothing. A google search didn't
              turn up anything useful either - at least, nothing that I could comprehend,
              that is. But I'm still working at it...

              Norm
            • Robert C Wittig
              ... This router/firewall I purchased cost me under $20.00, and doesn t take up much desk space. I ll report how it works out for me. ... Heh! The man pages are
              Message 6 of 20 , Aug 2, 2005
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                Norm Higgs wrote:

                > I've been rather undecided on whether to just buy a commmercial
                > router/firewall, or put together an older pentuim pc and put smoothwall or
                > some other 'nix based router/firewall.

                This router/firewall I purchased cost me under $20.00, and doesn't take
                up much desk space.

                I'll report how it works out for me.

                > LOL - I have no clue how to consult my man pages! I saw that mentioned many
                > times but nothing to clue me into how to do it. I didn't even know there
                > were any man pages.

                Heh! The man pages are in your computer.

                Open a shell, aka a terminal... like opening a command.com or cmd.exe
                shell in Windows. Then, if you want to learn about a command, line
                'mount' you type 'man mount', and press 'Enter', and instead of
                executing the command, it will open a man page for the command 'mount',
                for you.

                These man pages were written for programmers, and they are quite terse,
                but once you get used to the format, they are very useful, because they
                are all written the same way.

                > The main thing I've been looking for is the network driver. I found
                > references for where to find it in the 2.4 kernel:

                I'm not even sure what you mean by a network driver. Most NIC's
                autoconfigure, when you boot up... they run on devices like eth0 and
                eth1, and use TCP/IP, which is native on *nix installs.

                To set your IP addy for your eth0 device, if you are running a graphical
                desktop, try clicking the Fedora icon ('Start' menu in Windows, then
                selecting something like 'System Tools | Network Device Control'

                Assign eth0 an IP of say... 192.168.0.100

                Then, manually assign one of your Windows boxes on the LAN
                192.168.0.101. You have to take Windows boxes off the Windows Networking
                auto-assign for IP's, and put it in the 192.168.0.X range, with your
                *nix box.

                Then open a terminal on the *nix box, and type 'ping 192.168.0.101' and
                you should be able to successfully ping with Windows box... assuming the
                LAN was working for the Windows boxes previously. To stop 'ping', use
                Crtl-C'

                Once you can ping back and forth, you know you have a network connection
                with TCP/IP, and you can work on playing with ssh, ftp, and eventually Samba

                This is stuff I just finished working the bugs out of a few weeks ago,
                so I have it fresh in my mind.<g>


                --
                -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
                .
              • Norm Higgs
                ... From: Robert C Wittig To: Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 5:11 PM Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies]
                Message 7 of 20 , Aug 2, 2005
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                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Robert C Wittig" <wittig@...>
                  To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 5:11 PM
                  Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New member


                  >
                  > Heh! The man pages are in your computer.
                  >
                  > Open a shell, aka a terminal... like opening a command.com or cmd.exe
                  > shell in Windows. Then, if you want to learn about a command, line
                  > 'mount' you type 'man mount', and press 'Enter', and instead of
                  > executing the command, it will open a man page for the command 'mount',
                  > for you.

                  Ahhh....just like the old DOS help files....I see...

                  > These man pages were written for programmers, and they are quite terse,
                  > but once you get used to the format, they are very useful, because they
                  > are all written the same way.
                  >
                  > > The main thing I've been looking for is the network driver. I found
                  > > references for where to find it in the 2.4 kernel:
                  >
                  > I'm not even sure what you mean by a network driver. Most NIC's
                  > autoconfigure, when you boot up... they run on devices like eth0 and
                  > eth1, and use TCP/IP, which is native on *nix installs.
                  >
                  > To set your IP addy for your eth0 device, if you are running a graphical
                  > desktop, try clicking the Fedora icon ('Start' menu in Windows, then
                  > selecting something like 'System Tools | Network Device Control'

                  I will take a look at it tonight when I get off work - thanks.

                  > Assign eth0 an IP of say... 192.168.0.100
                  >
                  > Then, manually assign one of your Windows boxes on the LAN
                  > 192.168.0.101. You have to take Windows boxes off the Windows Networking
                  > auto-assign for IP's, and put it in the 192.168.0.X range, with your
                  > *nix box.
                  >
                  > Then open a terminal on the *nix box, and type 'ping 192.168.0.101' and
                  > you should be able to successfully ping with Windows box... assuming the
                  > LAN was working for the Windows boxes previously. To stop 'ping', use
                  > Crtl-C'
                  >
                  > Once you can ping back and forth, you know you have a network connection
                  > with TCP/IP, and you can work on playing with ssh, ftp, and eventually
                  Samba
                  >
                  > This is stuff I just finished working the bugs out of a few weeks ago,
                  > so I have it fresh in my mind.<g>

                  I'll let you know how it goes tonight.
                • Norm Higgs
                  ... From: Norm Higgs To: Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 8:31 PM Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New
                  Message 8 of 20 , Aug 3, 2005
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                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Norm Higgs" <norm@...>
                    To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 8:31 PM
                    Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New member


                    > > I'm not even sure what you mean by a network driver. Most NIC's
                    > > autoconfigure, when you boot up... they run on devices like eth0 and
                    > > eth1, and use TCP/IP, which is native on *nix installs.

                    My NIC is not detected at start-up.

                    > > To set your IP addy for your eth0 device, if you are running a graphical
                    > > desktop, try clicking the Fedora icon ('Start' menu in Windows, then
                    > > selecting something like 'System Tools | Network Device Control'

                    Under Network Device Contol, there is nothing listed at all. No devices.

                    From what I have read, I have determined that I need to install a module
                    called 'sundance.o', it is supposed to initialize my NIC, but I can't figure
                    out where to find it. If anyone can help me find this thing and install, I
                    would
                    be most grateful!
                  • Robert C Wittig
                    ... Ok... this is possibly the case because you have an unsupported NIC. I am running Red Hat Enterprise, and IIRC, you are running Fedora, so they should be
                    Message 9 of 20 , Aug 3, 2005
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                      Norm Higgs wrote:

                      > My NIC is not detected at start-up.
                      >
                      >
                      >>>To set your IP addy for your eth0 device, if you are running a graphical
                      >>>desktop, try clicking the Fedora icon ('Start' menu in Windows, then
                      >>>selecting something like 'System Tools | Network Device Control'
                      >
                      >
                      > Under Network Device Contol, there is nothing listed at all. No devices.

                      Ok... this is possibly the case because you have an unsupported NIC.

                      I am running Red Hat Enterprise, and IIRC, you are running Fedora, so
                      they should be pretty similar. Check the Fedora website, to see if your
                      NIC is supported. I have been lucky so far, with Netgear, and the
                      generic SMC NIC's that I scrounge from older computers.

                      NIC's are really cheap, and as a builder, you might (like me) have a
                      drawer full of them, lying around. If you have one that is supported,
                      just swap it into the case, and when you restart Linux, the 'kudzu'
                      application will find the new hardware, and ask if you want to configure
                      it, and if you say 'yes', you will have that problem out of the way,
                      with very little messing around.

                      >>From what I have read, I have determined that I need to install a module
                      > called 'sundance.o', it is supposed to initialize my NIC, but I can't figure
                      > out where to find it. If anyone can help me find this thing and install, I
                      > would
                      > be most grateful!

                      I don't have any experience with this. It might turn out to be something
                      that requires a kernel recompile... something I have not yet tried doing.

                      A few years ago, Linux was a real pain, where finding supported hardware
                      was concerned, but nowadays, most newer versions support more hardware
                      out of the box than Windows does.


                      --
                      -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
                      .
                    • Norm Higgs
                      ... From: Robert C Wittig To: Sent: Wednesday, August 03, 2005 4:02 AM Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies]
                      Message 10 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Robert C Wittig" <wittig@...>
                        To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Wednesday, August 03, 2005 4:02 AM
                        Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New member



                        >
                        > I am running Red Hat Enterprise, and IIRC, you are running Fedora, so
                        > they should be pretty similar. Check the Fedora website, to see if your
                        > NIC is supported. I have been lucky so far, with Netgear, and the
                        > generic SMC NIC's that I scrounge from older computers.
                        >
                        > NIC's are really cheap, and as a builder, you might (like me) have a
                        > drawer full of them, lying around. If you have one that is supported,
                        > just swap it into the case, and when you restart Linux, the 'kudzu'
                        > application will find the new hardware, and ask if you want to configure
                        > it, and if you say 'yes', you will have that problem out of the way,
                        > with very little messing around.

                        I had a spare D-link NIC, but I'm using it in the computer I put together
                        for
                        My grandkids to play on when they are here. They love the Nickelodeon site
                        and Disney.com. I don't think I have any others laying around. Do you think
                        it
                        would be worth trying other distro's? or would this kind of problem be
                        present
                        in all flavors?

                        > >>From what I have read, I have determined that I need to install a module
                        > > called 'sundance.o', it is supposed to initialize my NIC, but I can't
                        figure
                        > > out where to find it. If anyone can help me find this thing and install,
                        I
                        > > would
                        > > be most grateful!
                        >
                        > I don't have any experience with this. It might turn out to be something
                        > that requires a kernel recompile... something I have not yet tried doing.

                        I have found a Sundance module in my distro, but its sundance.ko. I don't
                        know if that makes a difference or not. I tried to compile a sundance.o
                        module
                        I found on the net, but it seems the GCC 3.4 compiler that ships with FC3 is
                        broken. I found a page with instructions on installing the GCC 4.0 compiler
                        to fix it, but I'm thinking it might be alot simpler to just D/L and install
                        FC4, its
                        not like I would be losing anything by scrapping this distro and starting
                        fresh...

                        > A few years ago, Linux was a real pain, where finding supported hardware
                        > was concerned, but nowadays, most newer versions support more hardware
                        > out of the box than Windows does.
                        >
                        >
                        > --
                        > -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
                        > .
                        >
                        >
                        > To unsubscribe from this list, please email
                        LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        ------
                        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                        >
                        > a.. Visit your group "LINUX_Newbies" on the web.
                        >
                        > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        > LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        >
                        > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                        Service.
                        >
                        >
                        > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        ------
                        >
                        >
                      • Robert C Wittig
                        ... I m not positive, being somewhat of a newbie myself, but I think that support for NIC s and modems is built into the Linux kernel, and most new,
                        Message 11 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                          Norm Higgs wrote:

                          > I had a spare D-link NIC, but I'm using it in the computer I put together
                          > for
                          > My grandkids to play on when they are here. They love the Nickelodeon site
                          > and Disney.com. I don't think I have any others laying around. Do you think
                          > it
                          > would be worth trying other distro's? or would this kind of problem be
                          > present
                          > in all flavors?

                          I'm not positive, being somewhat of a newbie myself, but I think that
                          support for NIC's and modems is built into the Linux kernel, and most
                          new, cutting-edge distros are going to be using the same,
                          latest-greatest kernel.

                          If I'm wrong, hopefully, one of the list gurus will jump in and correct me.

                          On the 'linux' Yahoo list (Linux_Newbies is operated by the same people)
                          there is a person having a similar problem with a D-Link modem. It could
                          be that D-Link is just not very Linux-friendly.

                          >>>>From what I have read, I have determined that I need to install a module
                          >>>called 'sundance.o', it is supposed to initialize my NIC, but I can't

                          Interesting... I think the person with the D-Link modem problem
                          mentioned this module in reference to his difficulties, too. He had it
                          successfully installed, but it still did not help.

                          You might want to join the 'linux' list as well, and check out the
                          'internal modems' thread.

                          I'm subscribed to both lists, so I don't miss anything.


                          --
                          -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
                          .
                        • Norm Higgs
                          ... From: Robert C Wittig To: Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 3:59 AM Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies]
                          Message 12 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "Robert C Wittig" <wittig@...>
                            To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 3:59 AM
                            Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New member


                            >
                            >
                            > Norm Higgs wrote:
                            >
                            > > I had a spare D-link NIC, but I'm using it in the computer I put
                            together
                            > > for
                            > > My grandkids to play on when they are here. They love the Nickelodeon
                            site
                            > > and Disney.com. I don't think I have any others laying around. Do you
                            think
                            > > it
                            > > would be worth trying other distro's? or would this kind of problem be
                            > > present
                            > > in all flavors?
                            >
                            > I'm not positive, being somewhat of a newbie myself, but I think that
                            > support for NIC's and modems is built into the Linux kernel, and most
                            > new, cutting-edge distros are going to be using the same,
                            > latest-greatest kernel.
                            >
                            > If I'm wrong, hopefully, one of the list gurus will jump in and correct
                            me.
                            >
                            > On the 'linux' Yahoo list (Linux_Newbies is operated by the same people)
                            > there is a person having a similar problem with a D-Link modem. It could
                            > be that D-Link is just not very Linux-friendly.


                            > Interesting... I think the person with the D-Link modem problem
                            > mentioned this module in reference to his difficulties, too. He had it
                            > successfully installed, but it still did not help.

                            Yes, some of the D-link models use sundance.o as well. I have a feeling it
                            only works well in the 2.4 kernel - most of the references I've come across
                            all relate to that kernel. One of the references had a list of the NICs that
                            sundance supported and they were mostly D-link and some IC Plus models
                            like in my MoBo. Maybe I will look for used NIC somewhere....



                            > You might want to join the 'linux' list as well, and check out the
                            > 'internal modems' thread.
                            >
                            > I'm subscribed to both lists, so I don't miss anything.
                            >
                            >
                            > --
                            > -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
                            > .
                            >
                            >
                            > To unsubscribe from this list, please email
                            LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            ------
                            > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                            >
                            > a.. Visit your group "LINUX_Newbies" on the web.
                            >
                            > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                            > LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                            >
                            > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                            Service.
                            >
                            >
                            > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            ------
                            >
                            >
                          • Chad Martin
                            ... Robert s right. Almost all hardware support in Linux is from the kernel itself. That s something new from the Windows world, where most pieces of
                            Message 13 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                              Norm Higgs wrote:
                              > I had a spare D-link NIC, but I'm using it in the computer I put together
                              > for
                              > My grandkids to play on when they are here. They love the Nickelodeon site
                              > and Disney.com. I don't think I have any others laying around. Do you think
                              > it
                              > would be worth trying other distro's? or would this kind of problem be
                              > present
                              > in all flavors?

                              Robert's right. Almost all hardware support in Linux is from the kernel
                              itself. That's something new from the Windows world, where most pieces
                              of hardware have their own external drivers. In Linux, it's all
                              internal to the kernel.

                              > I have found a Sundance module in my distro, but its sundance.ko. I don't
                              > know if that makes a difference or not. I tried to compile a sundance.o
                              > module

                              All modules in the 2.6 kernel have the extension .ko. That's what you
                              want, assuming you have a Sundance chipset.

                              Try, as root, running:

                              modprobe sundance

                              and let us know what happens. If nothing happens and you just get
                              another prompt, then it loaded correctly. If that's the case, try:

                              ifconfig

                              also as root. You should see an entry and some information for eth0.

                              Chad Martin
                            • Chad Martin
                              ... You re right, but modems are quite a different beast than LAN cards. ... Lies! I have tons of D-Link NICs and all of them work wonderfully, from 10BaseT
                              Message 14 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                                Robert C Wittig wrote:
                                > I'm not positive, being somewhat of a newbie myself, but I think that
                                > support for NIC's and modems is built into the Linux kernel, and most
                                > new, cutting-edge distros are going to be using the same,
                                > latest-greatest kernel.
                                >
                                > If I'm wrong, hopefully, one of the list gurus will jump in and correct me.

                                You're right, but modems are quite a different beast than LAN cards.

                                > On the 'linux' Yahoo list (Linux_Newbies is operated by the same people)
                                > there is a person having a similar problem with a D-Link modem. It could
                                > be that D-Link is just not very Linux-friendly.

                                Lies! I have tons of D-Link NICs and all of them work wonderfully, from
                                10BaseT up to gigabit ethernet. Like I said, modems are quite
                                different, so I wouldn't judge their NICs based on their modems.

                                Chad Martin
                              • Robert C Wittig
                                ... Thanks. Newbies helping newbies has its limitations. -- -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/ .
                                Message 15 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                                  Chad Martin wrote:

                                  > All modules in the 2.6 kernel have the extension .ko. That's what you
                                  > want, assuming you have a Sundance chipset.
                                  >
                                  > Try, as root, running:
                                  >
                                  > modprobe sundance
                                  >
                                  > and let us know what happens. If nothing happens and you just get
                                  > another prompt, then it loaded correctly. If that's the case, try:
                                  >
                                  > ifconfig
                                  >
                                  > also as root. You should see an entry and some information for eth0.

                                  Thanks.

                                  'Newbies helping newbies' has its limitations.<g>

                                  --
                                  -wittig http://www.robertwittig.com/
                                  .
                                • Norm Higgs
                                  ... From: Chad Martin To: Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 9:33 AM Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New member
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: "Chad Martin" <chad@...>
                                    To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 9:33 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New member


                                    >
                                    > All modules in the 2.6 kernel have the extension .ko. That's what you
                                    > want, assuming you have a Sundance chipset.
                                    >
                                    > Try, as root, running:
                                    >
                                    > modprobe sundance
                                    >
                                    > and let us know what happens. If nothing happens and you just get
                                    > another prompt, then it loaded correctly. If that's the case, try:
                                    >
                                    > ifconfig
                                    >
                                    > also as root. You should see an entry and some information for eth0.

                                    I've tried it - the module loads ok, but ifconfig commands returns an error.
                                    'no device present'. I think I'm pretty much at the point where I'm going
                                    to have to try adding in a different NIC.



                                    > Chad Martin
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > To unsubscribe from this list, please email
                                    LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    ------
                                    > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                                    >
                                    > a.. Visit your group "LINUX_Newbies" on the web.
                                    >
                                    > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                    > LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                    >
                                    > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                                    Service.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    ------
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Horror Vacui
                                    On Fri, 5 Aug 2005 14:35:08 -0700 ... Try ifconfig -a - it will display all network devices, configured or not. If there s no eth device there, the sundance
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                                      On Fri, 5 Aug 2005 14:35:08 -0700
                                      Norm wrote:

                                      > > Try, as root, running:
                                      > >
                                      > > modprobe sundance
                                      > >
                                      > > and let us know what happens. If nothing happens and you just get
                                      > > another prompt, then it loaded correctly. If that's the case, try:
                                      > >
                                      > > ifconfig
                                      > >
                                      > > also as root. You should see an entry and some information for
                                      > > eth0.
                                      >
                                      > I've tried it - the module loads ok, but ifconfig commands returns an
                                      > error. 'no device present'. I think I'm pretty much at the point where
                                      > I'm going to have to try adding in a different NIC.

                                      Try "ifconfig -a" - it will display all network devices, configured or
                                      not. If there's no eth device there, the sundance module is probably not
                                      the right one.

                                      What does "lspci" say about a "network interface" or something like
                                      that? Post this line here, it might give us useful hints.

                                      Cheers

                                      --
                                      Horror Vacui

                                      Registered Linux user #257714

                                      Go get yourself... counted: http://counter.li.org/
                                      - and keep following the GNU.
                                    • Felix Gomez
                                      Hello anyone, I need somebody s expertise on this matter: We have a DSL connection here in our office. We have another office quite far from here. I would like
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Aug 5, 2005
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                                        Hello anyone,

                                        I need somebody's expertise on this matter:

                                        We have a DSL connection here in our office. We have
                                        another office quite far from here. I would like to
                                        setup a dial up server here in our office so that
                                        another computer in another location can use the DSL
                                        internet connection. I have a difficulty in setting it
                                        up in windows so I will try it in Linux.

                                        What are the things I need to buy? and how will I set
                                        it up. My only experience in setting up an internet
                                        connection with Linux is thru direct connection using
                                        our DSL modem and connecting the rest of our computers
                                        here thru LAN.

                                        I have not tried configuring our server here to act as
                                        a dial-up server.

                                        Hoping somebody will help me set it up.

                                        Thanks!


                                        Engr. Felix T. Gomez, Jr., MST-CS
                                        Dean of College
                                        STI College Tacloban
                                        #355 Singzon Bldg.
                                        Real St., Tacloban City 06500
                                        Telefax # (053)325-6570
                                        http://felixtgomezjr.blogspot.com/








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                                      • Chad Martin
                                        ... This is a little outdated and based on Redhat, but you should be able to get some good information out of it.
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Aug 6, 2005
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                                          Felix Gomez wrote:
                                          > We have a DSL connection here in our office. We have
                                          > another office quite far from here. I would like to
                                          > setup a dial up server here in our office so that
                                          > another computer in another location can use the DSL
                                          > internet connection. I have a difficulty in setting it
                                          > up in windows so I will try it in Linux.
                                          >
                                          > What are the things I need to buy? and how will I set
                                          > it up. My only experience in setting up an internet
                                          > connection with Linux is thru direct connection using
                                          > our DSL modem and connecting the rest of our computers
                                          > here thru LAN.

                                          This is a little outdated and based on Redhat, but you should be able to
                                          get some good information out of it.

                                          http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/ISP-Setup-RedHat-HOWTO.html

                                          TLDP is your friend.

                                          Chad Martin
                                        • Norm Higgs
                                          ... From: Horror Vacui To: Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 4:56 PM Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Aug 6, 2005
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                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: "Horror Vacui" <horrorvacui@...>
                                            To: <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
                                            Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 4:56 PM
                                            Subject: Re: [LINUX_Newbies] New member


                                            > On Fri, 5 Aug 2005 14:35:08 -0700
                                            > Norm wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Try "ifconfig -a" - it will display all network devices, configured or
                                            > not. If there's no eth device there, the sundance module is probably not
                                            > the right one.

                                            This is what I get:

                                            lo Link encap:Local Loopback
                                            inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
                                            inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
                                            UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
                                            RX packets:1613 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
                                            TX packets:1613 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
                                            collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
                                            RX bytes:1533517 (1.4 MiB) TX bytes:1533517 (1.4 MiB)

                                            sit0 Link encap:IPv6-in-IPv4
                                            NOARP MTU:1480 Metric:1
                                            RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
                                            TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
                                            collisions:0 txqueuelen:0

                                            RX bytes:0 (0.0 b) TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)

                                            > What does "lspci" say about a "network interface" or something like
                                            > that? Post this line here, it might give us useful hints.

                                            Only entry relating to network is this one:

                                            02:0b.0 Ethernet controller: Sundance Technology Inc: Unknown device 0200
                                            (rev 31)
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