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perl -MCPAN -e shell

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  • Michael E. Cummins
    RHES 3.0 When I type perl -v, it politely informs me that I am using v5.8.0. I can verify a number of perl modules by typing things like perl -e use
    Message 1 of 8 , May 8 12:41 PM
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      RHES 3.0

      When I type perl -v, it politely informs me that I am using v5.8.0.

      I can verify a number of perl modules by typing things like perl -e 'use
      Digest::MD5'

      I am making preparations to install an app that uses perl and depends on
      certain modules. Some of the modules do not seem to be installed, such as
      HTML::Template, Crypt::Blowfish, etc.

      I look into installing these modules, and am invariably directed to use CPAN
      to do this.

      When I type perl -MCPAN -e shell, I receive an error:

      "Can't locate CPAN.pm in @INC" and then it politely tells me what @INC does
      contain.

      Q: What is @INC ?

      Q: Does this mean that my version of perl does not include CPAN ?

      Thank you for any feedback that you feel like sharing, it is greatly
      appreciated.


      -- Michael Cummins
    • polaris
      On Sat, 8 May 2004 15:41:03 -0400 ... Probably. Try locate CPAN.pm and see if you get any results. If not, just download the source here -
      Message 2 of 8 , May 8 1:14 PM
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        On Sat, 8 May 2004 15:41:03 -0400
        "Michael E. Cummins" <michael@...> wrote:

        > When I type perl -MCPAN -e shell, I receive an error:
        >
        > "Can't locate CPAN.pm in @INC" and then it politely tells me what @INC does
        > contain.
        >
        > Q: What is @INC ?
        >
        > Q: Does this mean that my version of perl does not include CPAN ?

        Probably. Try 'locate CPAN.pm' and see if you get any results. If not, just
        download the source here - http://search.cpan.org/~andk/CPAN-1.76/ - and
        install it, then try to run the shell again.

        Bob
      • Chad Martin
        Somebody already directed you about the second question, so I figured I d make note of the first. ... It s kinda like Perl s equivalent of the path. @INC is a
        Message 3 of 8 , May 8 3:03 PM
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          Somebody already directed you about the second question, so I figured
          I'd make note of the first.

          Michael E. Cummins wrote:
          > Q: What is @INC ?

          It's kinda like Perl's equivalent of the path. @INC is a list of
          directories where Perl looks for modules, like CPAN.pm.

          > Q: Does this mean that my version of perl does not include CPAN ?

          That would be strange, but it seems to be the case.

          Chad Martin
        • Michael E. Cummins
          In a Windows Networking environment, I can assign a large number of permissions to a folder under NTFS. I can say this person owns it, this person can read it
          Message 4 of 8 , May 9 12:06 PM
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            In a Windows Networking environment, I can assign a large number of
            permissions to a folder under NTFS.

            I can say "this person owns it, this person can read it but not write to it,
            this person...." so on and so forth.

            Exploring permissions on my Linux box, it doesn't seem to think the same
            way. I only see how to change ownership of a directory, or to change what
            group it belongs to.

            Do I understand this correctly? How do I accomplish the same sort of
            permissions arrangement that I do in Windows? Is it possible? Or do I
            simply have to learn a different way of thinking?



            Thanks for your feedback, it is greatly appreciated. :)

            -- Michael Cummins
          • Chad Martin
            ... Every file has an owner and a group. Furthermore, you can set read, write, and execute permissions for the owner, group, and everybody. chown changes the
            Message 5 of 8 , May 9 2:28 PM
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              Michael E. Cummins wrote:
              > Exploring permissions on my Linux box, it doesn't seem to think the same
              > way. I only see how to change ownership of a directory, or to change what
              > group it belongs to.
              >
              > Do I understand this correctly? How do I accomplish the same sort of
              > permissions arrangement that I do in Windows? Is it possible? Or do I
              > simply have to learn a different way of thinking?

              Every file has an owner and a group. Furthermore, you can set read,
              write, and execute permissions for the owner, group, and everybody.
              chown changes the ownership and chmod changes the permissions. If you
              run ls -l, you can see the permissions for each file on the left-hand
              side, which will have the pattern of rwxrwxrwx. The first three
              indicate the owner's permissions, then the group's, then everybody else.
              In this case, everybody has permissions to do everything. If you see
              something like r--r-----, then only the owner and group can read it, and
              nothing else.

              That should be the basic info you need to know.

              Chad Martin
            • Gerard Lutz
              ... See man chmod ! -- Amicalement, Gerard;-) Linux user # 302199 http://counter.li.org
              Message 6 of 8 , May 10 1:38 AM
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                Le Dimanche 9 Mai 2004 21:06, Michael E. Cummins a écrit :
                > In a Windows Networking environment, I can assign a large number of
                > permissions to a folder under NTFS.
                >
                > I can say "this person owns it, this person can read it but not write to
                > it, this person...." so on and so forth.
                >
                > Exploring permissions on my Linux box, it doesn't seem to think the same
                > way. I only see how to change ownership of a directory, or to change what
                > group it belongs to.
                >
                > Do I understand this correctly? How do I accomplish the same sort of
                > permissions arrangement that I do in Windows? Is it possible? Or do I
                > simply have to learn a different way of thinking?
                >
                >
                >
                > Thanks for your feedback, it is greatly appreciated. :)
                >
                > -- Michael Cummins
                >
                >
                >
                See man chmod !
                --
                Amicalement, Gerard;-)
                Linux user # 302199
                http://counter.li.org
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