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31078Re: [LINUX_Newbies] Re: Grep questions

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  • highskywhy@yahoo.de
    Jul 17, 2013
      Good afternoon
      Mi Jul 17 16:39:46 2013
      Thank You for help.

      > | > Normally, $HOME/bin. So:
      > | > - log in
      > | > - type "pwd" to check that you are in you home directory
      > | > - type "mkdir bin" to create a directory called "bin" in your home
      > | > directory
      > | *
      > | Is it better for not confuse myself to name it mybin
      > | ?
      >
      > Your call.
      *
      OK
      The idea is
      doing update or start a new Linux at new computer:

      bin is looking like Linux created
      mybin is looking: Oh, Sophie created it You have to backup this.

      But since it is in your home directory, it should already
      > be obvious that it is for you.
      >*
      OK

      > | > Then you need to put $HOME/bin into your $PATH.
      > | >
      > | > You can do this by running the command:
      > | >
      > | > PATH=$PATH:$HOME/bin
      > | > export PATH
      > | *
      > | Thank You.
      > |
      > | Then Linux is searching
      > | when I give comand like dothisnow
      > | in the
      > | directory
      > | bin or mybin
      > | for
      > | dothisnow.sh.
      > |
      > | ?
      >
      > No. It searches for an executable file named "dothisnow".
      *
      Ok.
      But where?
      In the path directories or the whole hd?


      > Windows does that oddball "add an extension". In UNIX, what you
      > type is what is looked for.
      *
      OK
      >
      > Normally you do not end _commands_ in an extension saying what the
      > language is. Instead, for scripts the leading shebang line:
      >
      > #!/bin/sh
      >
      > tells the kernel what program will be used to run the script.

      *
      OK
      >
      > So you make a script and store it as "/home/user1/bin/dothisnow".
      > It starts with the line:
      >
      > #!/bin/sh
      >
      > When you issue the command "dothisnow a b c", if the kernel finds
      > your script it will execute the actual command:
      >
      > /bin/sh /home/user1/bin/dothisnow a b c
      *
      Thank You.
      >
      > getting the "/bin/sh" from the first line of the script.
      > In this way you can write scripts in different languages depending
      > on your needs, and make them up so that the kernel knows how to run
      > them.
      +
      thank You.
      >
      > As another example, a Python script would normally have a shebang
      line like:
      >
      > #!/usr/bin/python

      *
      OK

      >
      > | > That does it only for the shell you ran it in.
      > | *
      > | This does mean
      > | I close the terminal
      > | and Linux will forget it.
      >
      > Yes.
      >

      Regards
      Sophie
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