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Re: [LENO] FW: Let's make a difference in SW Lansing.

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  • fox9glove@juno.com
    This time my computer aborted the survey and gave me a redX. Maybe it is only the comcast VS Juno problem because I am able to get attachments from all other
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 7, 2007
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      I'm trying one more time . . .
      --
      Kathie Dunbar, Director
      South Lansing Community
      Development Association
      1900 Boston Blvd.
      Lansing MI 48910
      517-374-5700 (Office)
      slcda@comcast. net
       
      ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
      From: fox9glove@juno. com

      I got a reply that the survey was in a read only format that couldn't be filled out or printed.  I'm attaching another copy of the survey.  Let me know if this one is also problematic.  Thanks!! 
       
      --
      Kathie Dunbar, Director
      South Lansing Community
      Development Association
      1900 Boston Blvd.
      Lansing MI 48910
      517-374-5700 (Office)
      slcda@comcast. net
       
      ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
      From: fox9glove@juno. com

      From: slcda@comcast. net [mailto:slcda@ comcast.net]
      Sent: Tuesday, February 13, 2007 7:40 PM
      Subject: Let's make a difference in SW Lansing.

       
      Hello Neighbors!
           You may have read in the February issue of South Lansing Community News that SLCDA is in the survey phase of our Economic Development Project (relevant articles are pasted below).  The EDP is a collaborative effort with local community and economic development agencies to improve the commercial and retail environment in Southwest Lansing. 
           Our target redevelopment area is bounded roughly by Pleasant Grove, Holmes, Waverly, and Jolly Roads.  Many commercial properties in this are considered blighted and/or exhibit characteristics of negative social commerce.  Unfortunately, potential investors often judge the spending potential of local consumers based on exhisting retail patterns.   
            The attached survey is one of several tools we are using to demonstrate to business investors the income level, consumer preferences, and spending potential of local residents.  SLCDA’s goal is to increase local spending by attracting new business development that reduces blight and meets identified community needs.  
            We have a unique opportunity to help shape the commercial and retail climate of our community, but we can't do it without YOU!
           Please take a moment to complete the survey and return by email.  All responses are kept confidential and participant names will not be shared with anyone.  If you prefer, print a hard copy and mail to SLCDA, or take your completed survey to your next neighborhood association meeting, and SLCDA staff members will collect them. 
          Also, please forward this survey to others in your neighborhood association or anyone else you know (friends, family, school parents, etc) who live south of Mt. Hope and west of MLK.  Kindly cc this organization (slcda@comcast. net) on any forwarding emails so we an keep track of who's received a survey.
           Feel free to email or call me with any questions or comments regarding the survey.  And thanks in advance for your participation. 
      --
      Kathie Dunbar, Director
      South Lansing Community
      Development Association
      1900 Boston Blvd.
      Lansing MI 48910
      517-374-5700 (Office)
      slcda@comcast. net 

      The High Cost of Poverty

      Here’s a disturbing news flash – it’s expensive to be poor.  A recent study by the Brookings Institute found that poverty is actually perpetuated by living in low-income urban environments.

      People earning lower incomes are less likely to have bank accounts, primarily because there are fewer banks in their neighborhoods.  Instead, they tend to rely on pricey check-cashing businesses, which can be found on almost every corner in low-income area.

      Low-income car buyers pay an average of two percentage points more for a car loan than wealthier buyers.  Low-income drivers can expect to pay hundreds of dollars more for insurance each year than affluent drivers with identical vehicles.

      When furnishing a home, many low-income households cannot afford large purchases.  Instead, people make monthly payments on furniture and appliances from rent-to-own businesses, where they often pay higher prices because they are spending hundreds of additional dollars on interest.

      Large supermarkets that carry affordable, quality food and merchandise are rarely found in poor neighborhoods.  Residents are forced to rely on convenience stores, paying far more for basic groceries.  Our poorest neighbors may be forced to buy ready-to-eat meals at local gas stations or fast-food chains.

      The cost of utilities is often higher in poor neighborhoods because residents usually live in older, less energy-efficient homes, and homeowners may not have the funds to weatherize or make necessary repairs. 

      Low-income neighborhoods usually lack medical and dental facilities.  Because many of the working poor lack health insurance, trips to the emergency room are also more common and over ten times more expensive than trips to a physician’s office.

      Teaching the poor how to manage their finances is valuable, but it won’t put a dent in poverty until community leaders address the local environment that systematically keeps people poor.  For more info, visit www.aecf.org/ initiatives/ fes/pdf/onepage/ fes_highcost. pdf. 

              To see what SLCDA is doing to help, read about our SouthWest Economic Development Program.

      Your Local Economy Depends on You

      It is important to shop close to home to keep money circulating through our local economy.  The local businesses you patronize pay wages to employees, who in turn purchase goods and services from other merchants, who in turn pay another employee, all of which infuses dollars back into our community and strengthens our local tax base.

      For almost two years, the South Lansing Community Development Association has been working to improve the commercial and retail environment in South Lansing, with particular emphasis on the area south of Holmes Rd. and west of Pleasant Grove.

      Southwest Lansing is home to six neighborhood organizations, quality housing stock, a solid base of homeownership, and large numbers of double-income, college educated households. 

      Yet, the majority of establishments on the corner of Pleasant Grove and Holmes and on Waverly from Holmes to Jolly are reflective of the low-income community model outlined in the previous article, including multiple convenience and liquor stores, and check cashing stores instead of banks. 

      For those in lower income brackets, this kind of environment can actually perpetuate  poverty.  And those in higher income brackets are often forced to leave the area to find a wider range of goods and services. 

      SLCDA initiated an Economic Development Program (EDP) combining citizen input with economic development incentives and aggressive marketing to improve the commercial and retail landscape and build the local economy in Southwest Lansing.

      One of the problems we encountered when trying create a marketing package for potential investors (and existing business owners) was a lack of incentives available for our unique economic demographic.  This situation is changing now that Lansing’s Economic Development Corporation has a director assigned specifically to the south side. 

      In addition to the EDC’s new incentives, SLCDA is compiling demographic expense and income data for potential business investors.  The information will also include a wish list of establishments that would meet identified community needs. 

      We’ve been able to gather information through the latest census, but information on spending habits can only be gathered by surveying residents to find out where they currently shop for goods and services and what types of businesses they would like to see in their neighborhoods.  That’s where you come in . . .

      Over the next several months, SLCDA staff will be distributing surveys at local community meetings.  If you live in Southwest Lansing and do not attend neighborhood meetings, we will gladly send you a survey.  By mid-February, surveys will also be available online at www.slcda.org. 

      You may return the surveys by mail or by dropping them off at the SLCDA office in Grace United Methodist Church (corner of Mt. Hope and Boston Blvd.).  If you are unable to return the surveys, call 374-5700 and a staff member will gladly pick them up.   

       

       

       

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