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Bell's Vireo

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  • larschmahl@aol.com
    LA Co. birders, I found a singing Bell s Vireo at Basque del Rio Hiondo in the Whittier Narrows area today, June 1st, at about 7:30 am. The bird was in a row
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 1, 2002
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      LA Co. birders,

      I found a singing Bell's Vireo at Basque del Rio Hiondo in the Whittier
      Narrows area today, June 1st, at about 7:30 am.
      The bird was in a row of Mule Fat and Elderberry behind the restroom
      building. Although that area does have a lot of Mule Fat in it, there seems
      to me to be better habitat not far from there right along the Rio Hondo. It
      was the only Bell's Vireo I saw or heard all morning. There were also 3
      Yellow-breasted Chats on territory at about 75 yard intervals along the bike
      path.
      If any of you are transplanted birders from back east and miss the song of
      the Northern Cardinal, there were two singing males in the general area.
      (Northern Cardinals were introduced into the Whittier Narrows area decades
      ago and have maintained a population ever since.)

      Basque del Rio Hondo is in the Whittier Narrows area in the N.W. corner of
      San Gabriel Blvd. and Rosemead Blvd. There is free parking and a
      pedestrian/bike path leads from the parking lot and follows the east side of
      the Rio Hondo.


      Larry Schmahl
      Whittier


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    • Jean Brandt
      Thanks to Irwin Waldman, I saw the Bell’s Vireo that he reported at the Sepulveda Basin this morning. It was singing up a storm and hopping in and out of
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 3, 2005
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        Thanks to Irwin Waldman, I saw the Bell’s Vireo that he reported at the
        Sepulveda Basin this morning. It was singing up a storm and hopping in and
        out of sight most satisfactorily. Start at the north end from the parking
        lot and walk south along the path. Start listening for the bird near the
        last trail to the lake before you turn east at the end.



        I did not see either the Eastern Phoebe or the Green-tailed Towhee. There is
        a beautiful alternate plumage Myrtle Warbler in the cottonwoods about ½ way
        down and Bullock’s Orioles are abundant everywhere.



        Good birding,



        Jean Brandt



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