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GWFG at KMHRP and more

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  • Martin Byhower
    There is an adult Greater White-fronted Goose at Ken Malloy/Harbor Regional Park. It is with the Greylag, Chinese, and Canada Geese near the newer playground
    Message 1 of 1 , May 30, 2012
      There is an adult Greater White-fronted Goose at Ken Malloy/Harbor Regional Park. It is with the Greylag, Chinese, and Canada Geese near the newer playground area accessible from the central Vermont lot between PCH and Anaheim St. The bird is tame. While there, if you arrive early, you might want to check the large expanses of Ludwigia (water primrose/yellow waterweed) for the American Bittern that is likely summering again at the park. Other birds that are present include a female Yellow-headed Blackbird, a Cattle Egret, and the continuing Yellow-breasted Chat(s).
      Perhaps of greater interest to local birders, a hike Sunday through nearby Upper George F Canyon produced a number of breeding species that are rare, and in some cases, all but extirpated as breeders in the South Bay area. I saw/heard several male Phainopepla (no females, but I am hopeful), an abundance of Pacific Slope Flycatchers, good numbers of Black-headed Grosbeaks, and a number of other expected species, including House and Bewick's Wrens, Hutton's Vireos, Hooded Orioles, Downy Woodpeckers, our local sordida (Channel Island) race of Orange Crowned Warbler, and many others. I didn't hear/see Swainson's Thrushes and Purple Finches, but I hope they are also breeding this year. Upper George F canyon is a remarkable area that is probably the most wild, pristine, and lovely spots left on the PV Peninsula. It has perennial water and is generally north-facing, which makes it an ideal spot for wildlife. If you don't have access behind the gates in
      Rolling Hills, a good point of access (though a bit steep) is from the Martingale trailhead. From PV Drive North, take Bronco Lane until it almost ends-on the right you will see the small sign and horse trough. Go down the trail to the canyon bottom, turn right, and follow the trail down to the stream crossing-a beautiful spot. Then keep going, cross Poppy Lane and continue up the Willow Spring Trail until you reach Purple Canyon (named for the Jurassic Catalina Schist that is the basement rock for all of LA and which comes to the surface here). Follow Purple Canyon until you cross the road, continue down the trail (I believe it is upper  Willow Spring Trail at this point?) and you will loop back to the place you came down. Bring water, watch for poison oak, but also watch for an incredible sampling of native Channel Island flora and fauna. The area has greater affinities with the Channel Islands than the mainland, and some folks think that many of
      the birds and other life merit distinct subspecies status-see if you can hear a difference in the Spotted Towhee calls, for example..Sorry for the long post, but hope some of you will come down and check what our area has to offer!
      Martin Byhower
      Lomita

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