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Re: Donate Books

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  • John Segedy
    Wanda et al, One way of dealing with books that are being discarded is to buy them back (usually for pennies on the dollar) and discreetly put them on the
    Message 1 of 1 , May 6, 2004
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      Wanda et al,

      One way of dealing with books that are being discarded is to buy
      them back (usually for pennies on the dollar) and discreetly put them on
      the shelves. They won't be in file cards (Databases now) but they will
      be on the shelves, presumably in the area where someone looking for that
      subject would find them.

      Your idea of checking out certain books just to keep record of them
      circulating is a great one.


      John S.

      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >Message: 18
      > Date: Tue, 04 May 2004 18:40:05 +0000
      > From: "Wanda Madeyski" <wandamilan@...>
      >Subject: RE: Donated books
      >
      >Dear Richard:
      >
      >I am very curious if the books you donated to California State University
      >were still there a year later. For years I have been donating and
      >distributing books about Polish accomplishments to schools, libraries and
      >private persons. I found out that many of them had been promptly withdrawn
      >from the shelves and computer indexes; and placed on a rack where they were
      >sold for one or two dollars (after I spent hundreds). This was especially
      >applicable to the books that presented how Poles were helping and saving
      >Jews under German occupation, such as The Forgotten Holocaust, Did the
      >Children Cry and above all The Martyrs of Charity of which I distrubuted
      >over 20 copies. My special interest in that book stemmed from my
      >half-sister's activities with Zegota. She lived close to the Jewish ghetto
      >after Germans created it, and she spirited many (dozens? hundreds?) to her
      >apartment and on to other christian Poles, who, like her, were willing to
      >risk their lives for them. It is not generally known that in Poland, and
      >ONLY in Poland there was a German law of immediate execution of the person
      >helping a Jew, even if that help consisted only of giving them some food and
      >water.
      >
      >I go to the libraries that I donated the books to, and check them out, so
      >that no one could say there was no interest in the subject and discard them.
      >Still they disappear. Sometimes they don't even make it into the computer
      >listing. It is frustrating to say the least. I have also presented books
      >about Poland to some foreign "big-wigs" I met in Washington and never heard
      >a "thank you."
      >
      >It reminds me of a story of a Washington party when a Frenchman offered a
      >drink to the Polish representative whereupon hearing "No, thank you," said:
      >"We have a saying in French "drunk like a Pole." "Never mind" said the
      >Polish diplomat, "Sayings are usually false. We have a saying in Poland
      >"polite like a Frenchman, thank you."
      >
      >Take care,
      >
      >Wanda M
      >Atlanta
      >USA
      >
      >
      >>From: "Richard Widerynski" <richpna@...>
      >>Reply-To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      >>To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      >>Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book recommendation
      >>Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 07:51:53 -0700
      >>
      >>Dear Wanda,
      >>Years ago the head librarian at California State University Long Beach was
      >>a fellow Polonian. As a result, the Polish group to which I belonged was
      >>able to make donations of many books on the subject of Poland to the
      >>university to bolster the pitiful few on the bookshelves. One of the books
      >>donated was entitled, "Seizing the Enigma" by David Kahn (Houghton/Mifflin
      >>1991). The book devotes several chapters to the seminal work done by the
      >>Polish codebreakers Marian Rejewski and Henryk Zygalski. It's a great
      >>read, thoroughly researched and definitely lays waste to the claim that the
      >>British and Americans broke the enigma.
      >>Take care.
      >>Rich Widerynski
      >>Long Beach, CA
      >>
      >>
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