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DOULAB CEMETERY TEHERAN

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  • Jaroslaw
    It may still be of interest to some of you to know that the primary source of information on the cemetery is at www.doulabcemetery.com This gives the names,
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 29, 2013
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      It may still be of interest to some of you to know that the primary source of information on the cemetery is at www.doulabcemetery.com This gives the names, DOB and death, the number of the grave and reference number, digital photo of the grave(!)and a map of the cemetery so that you can pinpoint any grave. If you want to find the location of the cemetery on Google maps – look for DULAB cemetery, not Doulab.

      I have found my sister's grave there, and it shook my heart and mind to the core. My mother almost never talked about her – the memory must have been too painful. Alunia was only seven when she died of meningitis in 1942, I was three – and the only comment I recall is that she was very good to me. But for seventy years Alunia did not exist for me; and for seventy long years she has been waiting, quietly, patiently for her little brother to come, say hello, give her a hug, tell her that from the moment he saw her name on the grave in Doulab she has become an inseparable part of him and his life, and will remain so till the very end.

      And the only reason I am telling you all this, is that I am set on going to Teheran and Isfahan in April 2014 and have in mind to return via Turkestan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan (along the south and east, possibly Altai), Russia and Ukraine. With the exception of Iran, I have travelled with a backpack by train and bus in these countries a number of times now, but this coming trip will be a defining moment for me. If there is anything I can do for you on this trip - visit places of deportation, of memories, cemeteries… I will be happy to do it if I possibly can. Please contact me by email, or on K-S, and I will keep you informed of how my travel plans are developing.
      Jerry Kubica
    • Lenarda Szymczak
      Jerry, in your story you teach us to treasure what we have, because what is lost to time will never come back. You are truly a loving brother, God keep you
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 29, 2013
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        Jerry, in your story you teach us to treasure what we have, because what is lost to time will never come back.  You are truly a loving brother, God keep you safe on your journey. 

        Lenarda, Sydney, Australia

         

        From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jaroslaw
        Sent: Saturday, 30 November 2013 6:00 AM
        To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] DOULAB CEMETERY TEHERAN

         

         

        It may still be of interest to some of you to know that the primary source of information on the cemetery is at www.doulabcemetery.com This gives the names, DOB and death, the number of the grave and reference number, digital photo of the grave(!)and a map of the cemetery so that you can pinpoint any grave. If you want to find the location of the cemetery on Google maps – look for DULAB cemetery, not Doulab.

        I have found my sister's grave there, and it shook my heart and mind to the core. My mother almost never talked about her – the memory must have been too painful. Alunia was only seven when she died of meningitis in 1942, I was three – and the only comment I recall is that she was very good to me. But for seventy years Alunia did not exist for me; and for seventy long years she has been waiting, quietly, patiently for her little brother to come, say hello, give her a hug, tell her that from the moment he saw her name on the grave in Doulab she has become an inseparable part of him and his life, and will remain so till the very end.

        And the only reason I am telling you all this, is that I am set on going to Teheran and Isfahan in April 2014 and have in mind to return via Turkestan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan (along the south and east, possibly Altai), Russia and Ukraine. With the exception of Iran, I have travelled with a backpack by train and bus in these countries a number of times now, but this coming trip will be a defining moment for me. If there is anything I can do for you on this trip - visit places of deportation, of memories, cemeteries… I will be happy to do it if I possibly can. Please contact me by email, or on K-S, and I will keep you informed of how my travel plans are developing.
        Jerry Kubica

      • Andrew Stephen
        Thanks for posting Jerry. Very moving. // Andrew.Sydney Australia. To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com From: rootstrust@yahoo.co.uk Date: Fri, 29 Nov 2013
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 29, 2013
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          Thanks for posting Jerry.

          Very moving.

          // Andrew.
          Sydney Australia. 


          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
          From: rootstrust@...
          Date: Fri, 29 Nov 2013 18:59:57 +0000
          Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] DOULAB CEMETERY TEHERAN

           
          It may still be of interest to some of you to know that the primary source of information on the cemetery is at www.doulabcemetery.com This gives the names, DOB and death, the number of the grave and reference number, digital photo of the grave(!)and a map of the cemetery so that you can pinpoint any grave. If you want to find the location of the cemetery on Google maps – look for DULAB cemetery, not Doulab.

          I have found my sister's grave there, and it shook my heart and mind to the core. My mother almost never talked about her – the memory must have been too painful. Alunia was only seven when she died of meningitis in 1942, I was three – and the only comment I recall is that she was very good to me. But for seventy years Alunia did not exist for me; and for seventy long years she has been waiting, quietly, patiently for her little brother to come, say hello, give her a hug, tell her that from the moment he saw her name on the grave in Doulab she has become an inseparable part of him and his life, and will remain so till the very end.

          And the only reason I am telling you all this, is that I am set on going to Teheran and Isfahan in April 2014 and have in mind to return via Turkestan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan (along the south and east, possibly Altai), Russia and Ukraine. With the exception of Iran, I have travelled with a backpack by train and bus in these countries a number of times now, but this coming trip will be a defining moment for me. If there is anything I can do for you on this trip - visit places of deportation, of memories, cemeteries… I will be happy to do it if I possibly can. Please contact me by email, or on K-S, and I will keep you informed of how my travel plans are developing.
          Jerry Kubica


        • ANN SIBURUTH
          Jerry, you are an amazing man!   I ve just logged onto the website for Doulab cemetery, and found for the very first time my grandmother s headstone.   I
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 30, 2013
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            Jerry, you are an amazing man!   I've just logged onto the website for Doulab cemetery, and found for the very first time my grandmother's headstone.   I can't describe how I feel at the moment - shock! sadness, weepy;  all kinds of emotions.   I never knew she had a headstone, but she has.    Maria Wojturska - R.I.P is what it says.    This is going to take some getting over - wait until I tell the rest of the family in Poland.    I only wish my Dad was alive so I could show it to him.    Thank you so much Jerry, and good luck with God speed for your journey next year.    My family were somewhere in Altai Kraj.    Very best wishes.
             
            Ann
             
          • Richard Zajkowski
            Best of luck for your trip next year, Jaroslaw. Sounds like you are quite the adventurer! I accompanied my father to Doulab Cemetery in September and I can
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 30, 2013
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            Best of luck for your trip next year, Jaroslaw. Sounds like you are quite the adventurer!

             

            I accompanied my father to Doulab Cemetery in September and I can tell you I found it quite an amazing place.

             

            Both silent sadness, and tranquil peace, in the one location.

             

            Photo of my Grandmother's gravestone attached.

             

            They do a good job of keeping the cemetery in good condition, and the manager and attendees are very respectful and supportive.

             

            If anyone is planning such a trip, I am happy to recommend the tour guide we used (English speaking too) - not just for the cemetery visit but also for seeing other interesting local sights.

             

            Cheers

             

            Richard

            Auckland

            New Zealand

             

            From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jaroslaw
            Sent: Saturday, 30 November 2013 8:00 a.m.
            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] DOULAB CEMETERY TEHERAN

             

             

            It may still be of interest to some of you to know that the primary source of information on the cemetery is at www.doulabcemetery.com This gives the names, DOB and death, the number of the grave and reference number, digital photo of the grave(!)and a map of the cemetery so that you can pinpoint any grave. If you want to find the location of the cemetery on Google maps – look for DULAB cemetery, not Doulab.

            I have found my sister's grave there, and it shook my heart and mind to the core. My mother almost never talked about her – the memory must have been too painful. Alunia was only seven when she died of meningitis in 1942, I was three – and the only comment I recall is that she was very good to me. But for seventy years Alunia did not exist for me; and for seventy long years she has been waiting, quietly, patiently for her little brother to come, say hello, give her a hug, tell her that from the moment he saw her name on the grave in Doulab she has become an inseparable part of him and his life, and will remain so till the very end.

            And the only reason I am telling you all this, is that I am set on going to Teheran and Isfahan in April 2014 and have in mind to return via Turkestan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan (along the south and east, possibly Altai), Russia and Ukraine. With the exception of Iran, I have travelled with a backpack by train and bus in these countries a number of times now, but this coming trip will be a defining moment for me. If there is anything I can do for you on this trip - visit places of deportation, of memories, cemeteries… I will be happy to do it if I possibly can. Please contact me by email, or on K-S, and I will keep you informed of how my travel plans are developing.
            Jerry Kubica

          • Julian Plowy
            Thank you Jerry, I was able to find the information on my father. I have a photo of me standing as a boy of 2 next to his wooden cross at that grave site. It
            Message 6 of 7 , Dec 1, 2013
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              Thank you Jerry,

              I was able to find the information on my father. I have a photo of me standing as a boy of 2 next to his wooden cross at that grave site. It was great and moving to see his grave stone with his name after all these years. I was sure that only the written records remained and the wooden cross totally deteriorated after all theses years.

              I can't thank you enough for posting this information.

              Julek





              On Fri, Nov 29, 2013 at 10:59 AM, Jaroslaw <rootstrust@...> wrote:
               

              It may still be of interest to some of you to know that the primary source of information on the cemetery is at www.doulabcemetery.com This gives the names, DOB and death, the number of the grave and reference number, digital photo of the grave(!)and a map of the cemetery so that you can pinpoint any grave. If you want to find the location of the cemetery on Google maps – look for DULAB cemetery, not Doulab.

              I have found my sister's grave there, and it shook my heart and mind to the core. My mother almost never talked about her – the memory must have been too painful. Alunia was only seven when she died of meningitis in 1942, I was three – and the only comment I recall is that she was very good to me. But for seventy years Alunia did not exist for me; and for seventy long years she has been waiting, quietly, patiently for her little brother to come, say hello, give her a hug, tell her that from the moment he saw her name on the grave in Doulab she has become an inseparable part of him and his life, and will remain so till the very end.

              And the only reason I am telling you all this, is that I am set on going to Teheran and Isfahan in April 2014 and have in mind to return via Turkestan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan (along the south and east, possibly Altai), Russia and Ukraine. With the exception of Iran, I have travelled with a backpack by train and bus in these countries a number of times now, but this coming trip will be a defining moment for me. If there is anything I can do for you on this trip - visit places of deportation, of memories, cemeteries… I will be happy to do it if I possibly can. Please contact me by email, or on K-S, and I will keep you informed of how my travel plans are developing.
              Jerry Kubica


            • Izabela Spero
              Dear Jerry Thank you for sharing part of your life story with us. I just can t imagine how you must have felt standing by your little sister s grave, I can
              Message 7 of 7 , Dec 2, 2013
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                Dear Jerry

                Thank you for sharing part of your life story with us. I just can't imagine how you must have felt standing by your little sister's grave, I can only presume that happiness and despair were among other feelings.
                I was in Iran in September this year. I went with the Australian and NZ group because UK travel agencies don't do trips to Iran. My grandfather was in Iran during the war. I only know
                that he was in Pahlavi ( Bandar Anzali now) I think he was also in Hammadan, I still need to find out more details about his Iranian passage. Regretfully, our free time was limited and as you are aware Tehran traffic is one of its kind therefore I didn't get a chance to go to Dulab cemetery there, neither did I visit Polish cemetery in Ishfahan.

                I would like to go back to Iran next year, as long as I get a visa as they may not like an idea of a woman travelling on her own. This time I would like to travel in my grandfather's footsteps. I found Iranian people extremely friendly and hospitable.

                We met young Dutchman, who was cycling around Iran. He told us that many times on his journey Iranians invited him to stay in their homes.
                He also travelled through Northern Iraq - Kurdistan, which he said was very beautiful.
                Only some parts are open to tourism, others are no go areas.

                I wonder if you would know where could I start to find more details of my grandfather's whereabouts in Iran?

                Best regards
                Izabela







                Izabela
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