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Off topic the word Liakhs used for Poles

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  • Krys Dobrzanski
    Dear Stefan and Julek, Sorry, the links are: http://www.volhyniamassacre.eu/swiadkowie-mowia http://polander.wordpress.com/2010/10/17/polish-roots-lechistan/
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 17, 2013
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      Dear Stefan and Julek,

      Sorry, the links  are: 


      Speaking to my husband whose father lived in Lwow and Brzezany areas there seemed to be a lot of antagonism towards the Poles (and visa versa) - the term "lachy" (Polish spelling) was definitely derogatory - "Smert Lachom!" was often heard in local street fights.

      "Lechici" however, is a more polite term and is, as Hania suggested, from the name Lech - one of the supposed founders of Poland (Lechistan)

      Apologies for not giving the links earlier as I tried to do it via my mobile phone and lost all the internet pages...... story of my life!

      With warmest wishes,
      Krys UK
      (Dobrzanska - researching Starzak, Gierula, Khlyuchanka lumber camp - Perm oblast, Tengeru )



      From: krysdobrzanski@...
      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tue, 17 Sep 2013 05:08:08 +0100
      Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Off topic the word Liakhs used for Poles

       



      Hi Julek,

      I also found another reference to Liakhs in the link below- it seems as if it is used as a derogatory term in this context.

      The Witnesses

      “Swing your sickle, swing your knife, at the ‘Liakh’ to take his life” — Accounts of the Survivors of the Volhynian Massacres

      With warmest wishes,
      Krys UK (Dobrzanska - researching Starzak, Gierula, Khlyuchanka lumber camp - Perm oblast, Tengeru )
      Sent from my iPhone

      On 16 Sep 2013, at 21:17, jayplowy@... wrote:

       
      I am reading "A History of Russian by Jesse D Clarkson and on page 19 he states that another word used in the past for Poles was Liakhs. Does anyone have any information regarding this information, how long and why was it used and why did it change.

      Was there any other word used to describe Poland or the Polish people.

      Also was Liakhs used to describe any other nationality.

      Thank you for any help

      Julek


    • Add Your Namekrysdobrzanski@talktalk.net
      Dear Stefan and Julek, Sorry, the links are: http://www.volhyniamassacre.eu/swiadkowie-mowia http://polander.wordpress.com/2010/10/17/polish-roots-lechistan/
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 17, 2013
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        Dear Stefan and Julek,

        Sorry, the links  are: 


        Speaking to my husband whose father lived in the Lwow and Brzezany areas, there seemed to be a lot of antagonism towards the Poles (and visa versa) - the term "lachy" (Polish spelling) was definitely derogatory - "Smert Lachom!" was often heard in local street fights.

        "Lechici" however, is a more polite term and is probably, as Hania suggested, from the name Lech - one of the supposed founders of Poland (Lechistan)

        Apologies for not giving the links earlier as I tried to do it via my mobile phone and lost all the internet pages...... story of my life!

        With warmest wishes,
        Krys UK
        (Dobrzanska - researching Starzak, Gierula, Khlyuchanka lumber camp - Perm oblast, Tengeru )




        On 16 Sep 2013, at 21:17, jayplowy@... wrote:

         
        I am reading "A History of Russian by Jesse D Clarkson and on page 19 he states that another word used in the past for Poles was Liakhs. Does anyone have any information regarding this information, how long and why was it used and why did it change.

        Was there any other word used to describe Poland or the Polish people.

        Also was Liakhs used to describe any other nationality.

        Thank you for any help

        Julek



        -----Original Message-----
        From: Barbara <barb_001@...>
        To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, 17 Sep 2013 20:04
        Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Off topic the word Liakhs used for Poles

         
        I have heard that Ukrainians have referred to Poles in a derogatory manner as "Lachy", in the same way as Poles referred to Germans as "Szwaby".

        Regards

        Basia, London UK

      • geniopoz8
        Lachy/Liakhy/Lechy/Lechowie etc. is an old word for Poland/Poles – I should think originating from Kresy and other Polish eastern borderlands. It is not
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 18, 2013
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          Lachy/Liakhy/Lechy/Lechowie etc. is an old word for Poland/Poles – I should think originating from Kresy and other Polish eastern borderlands. It is not derogatory or offensive. 

          After the 3rd Partitioning of Poland - to highlight what they thought was the cowardly behaviour of the three powers, the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire (another enemy) would at each international event call on the The Ambassador to Lechistan (their name for Poland) as a protest to the world regarding the vanished kingdom. This allegedly continued until 1918. The Ottomans respected their enemies who fought with honour and valour.

          After the Battle of Vienna they nicknamed Jan Sobieski "the Lion of Lechistan". 


          It also appears in Pan Tadeusz (I've pinched this from WikiQuotes):

          Lachy braty!
          Oj, biada mnie, żem nie miał choć jednej armaty!
          Dobrze mówił Suworów: "Pomnij, Ryków kamrat,
          Żebyś nigdy na Lachów nie chodził bez armat!"

          • Translation:
            "Brother Poles," said he,
            "Shame, I did not have even one cannon with me!
            'Mark this well, comrade Rykov,' Suvorov said once,
            'Against Poles you must never proceed without guns!' "

           


          I am sure others can come up with many other examples.

          Genio

          Manchester, UK




          --- In kresy-siberia@yahoogroups.com, <jayplowy@...> wrote:

          Does anyone know if the Poles were decedents of the Pechenegs or Polovsty group of people.

          There is some very oblique reference to this in the book I am reading.

          Can anyone give a definite beginning of Poland and it's historical ancestry?

          In addition is there a list of all the names that Poland or its people have been referred to.

          Julek


          On Tue, Sep 17, 2013 at 12:53 PM, Lenarda Szymczak <szymczak01@...> wrote:
           

          I have heard this derogatory term also, “Lachy” – those who latch on, lazy, etc. but did not want to comment, as I may be wrong.   In Australian we have a word “squatters” could “lachy” be their version of squatter.

          Lenarda, Australia

           

          From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Barbara
          Sent: Wednesday, 18 September 2013 5:04 AM
          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Off topic the word Liakhs used for Poles

           

           

          I have heard that Ukrainians have referred to Poles in a derogatory manner as "Lachy", in the same way as Poles referred to Germans as "Szwaby".

          Regards

          Basia, London UK


        • ed Bator
          Poland was known also, or called, by some nations as:  LEHISTAN Ed (s.j.) N.C., usa ________________________________ From: Anne Kaczanowski
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 18, 2013
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            Poland was known also, or called, by some nations as:  LEHISTAN
            Ed (s.j.) N.C., usa
            From: Anne Kaczanowski <kazameena@...>
            To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, September 16, 2013 4:26 PM
            Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Off topic the word Liakhs used for Poles
             
            Well you've heard the legend of the 3 brothers...Lech,Czech and Rus who are responsible for the beginning of Poland, Czechoslovskia and Ruthenia...  perhaps Liahks come from Lech.

            Hania
            Sent from my iPhone
            On 2013-09-16, at 2:17 PM, <jayplowy@...> wrote:
             
            I am reading "A History of Russian by Jesse D Clarkson and on page 19 he states that another word used in the past for Poles was Liakhs. Does anyone have any information regarding this information, how long and why was it used and why did it change.

            Was there any other word used to describe Poland or the Polish people.

            Also was Liakhs used to describe any other nationality.

            Thank you for any help

            Julek
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