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Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] KATYN the film by Wajda - a question.

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  • Krys Dobrzanski
    Hi Peter, I didn t have any relatives, as far as I know, in the massacre but the film really disturbed me. It has had a lasting impact on all my UK family
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 12, 2013
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      Hi Peter,
      I didn't have any relatives, as far as I know, in the massacre but the film really disturbed me. It has had a lasting impact on all my UK family members who watched the dvd. 
      My seemingly 'hard' husband cried through most of the film - these murders were unbelievably callous - the  work of a very sick, self-serving mind.

      With kind regards,
      Krys - UK (Dobrzanska - researching Starzak, Gierula, Khlyuchanka lumber camp, Perm oblast, Tengeru orphanage)
      Sent from my iPhone

      On 12 Sep 2013, at 07:50, muskus@... wrote:

       

      For those who lost parents or grandparents in this massacre and have watched the film. Did you find it helpful or did you wish that you hadn't watched it?

    • petermuskus
      Thanks to those who replied. I have the DVD and have lent it to the local cinema club in Nairn for assessment as to whether to include it in their programme. I
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 13, 2013
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        Thanks to those who replied. I have the DVD and have lent it to the local cinema club in Nairn for assessment as to whether to include it in their programme. I don't feel ready to watch it yet but will probably feel obliged if they screen it.


        Stefan and Anna sound to be having a great time in Poland. I enjoyed the photos.


        Best wishes

        Peter



        --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, <kresy-siberia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        Hi Peter,
        I didn't have any relatives, as far as I know, in the massacre but the film really disturbed me. It has had a lasting impact on all my UK family members who watched the dvd. 
        My seemingly 'hard' husband cried through most of the film - these murders were unbelievably callous - the  work of a very sick, self-serving mind.

        With kind regards,
        Krys - UK (Dobrzanska - researching Starzak, Gierula, Khlyuchanka lumber camp, Perm oblast, Tengeru orphanage)
        Sent from my iPhone

        On 12 Sep 2013, at 07:50, muskus@... wrote:

         

        For those who lost parents or grandparents in this massacre and have watched the film. Did you find it helpful or did you wish that you hadn't watched it?

      • Dan Ford
        What was particularly punishing is that the actual shootings are put off to the very end, so you begin to believe that you have been spared the details. I have
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 14, 2013
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          What was particularly punishing is that the actual shootings are put off
          to the very end, so you begin to believe that you have been spared the
          details.

          I have read just about everything available on the Katyn massacres, and
          it's obvious that Mr Wajda has done so as well. I think it is as close a
          re-creation of the event at Goat Hills as anyone will ever do.

          Altogether, it's a riveting and wonderful film that also tells a lot
          about what it was like to live in a Communist puppet state for all those
          years after the War.

          (Actually, it was the very first scene that brought tears to my eyes, as
          the young mother hurries across a bridge only to meet other people
          rushing in the opposite direction, one set fleeing the Germans, the
          other fleeing the Russians. She might have been the matronly lady that I
          knew in London in the 1950s, who'd managed to escape the despots by way
          of Kazakhstan, Persia, Lebanon, and Egypt.

          -- Dan Ford US
        • Mark
          This raises a very important point for me, that the story was well researched and validated much of what I knew. I just realized how it would be much worse if
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 14, 2013
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            This raises a very important point for me, that the story was well researched and validated much of what I knew.
            I just realized how it would be much worse if it was not accurate or the story incomplete.
             
            I dont know whether others in my family regret watching, we haven't discuss yet. That is odd in itself retrospectively.
            Thanks for raising this to think about.
             
            I add to the emotions of sadness, helplessness, anger and shock, the desire for the truth. 
            Their sacrifice has benefited us in many ways, and I think they would want us to know and not let anything go unnoticed.
            Thanks
             
            Mark T.
            Canada

            From: Dan Ford <cub06h@...>
            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2013 5:55:37 AM
            Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: KATYN the film by Wajda - a question.
             
            What was particularly punishing is that the actual shootings are put off
            to the very end, so you begin to believe that you have been spared the
            details.

            I have read just about everything available on the Katyn massacres, and
            it's obvious that Mr Wajda has done so as well. I think it is as close a
            re-creation of the event at Goat Hills as anyone will ever do.

            Altogether, it's a riveting and wonderful film that also tells a lot
            about what it was like to live in a Communist puppet state for all those
            years after the War.

            (Actually, it was the very first scene that brought tears to my eyes, as
            the young mother hurries across a bridge only to meet other people
            rushing in the opposite direction, one set fleeing the Germans, the
            other fleeing the Russians. She might have been the matronly lady that I
            knew in London in the 1950s, who'd managed to escape the despots by way
            of Kazakhstan, Persia, Lebanon, and Egypt.

            -- Dan Ford US
          • Lenarda Szymczak
            Dan and Mark, having the brutality at the end has a purpose, as it would be too emotional earlier (would you continue to watch?) and how would you finish the
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 14, 2013
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              Dan and Mark, having the brutality at the end has a purpose, as it would be too emotional earlier (would you continue to watch?) and how would you finish the movie, maybe with the exiles being given amnesty and fighting for freedom of Poland which never came.   There is too much history for one movie and now everything after Katyn is a sequel.   Katyn is the voice of the Kresy, if it was never discovered would we have a voice today? Would KS exist?  We the members of Kresy-Siberia,  are the sequel to Katyn, our stories, our truth, our witness, our research, remembrance and honour of the ones who suffered.

              Kind regards

              Lenarda, Australia

               

              From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark
              Sent: Sunday, 15 September 2013 12:54 AM
              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: KATYN the film by Wajda - a question.

               

               

              This raises a very important point for me, that the story was well researched and validated much of what I knew.

              I just realized how it would be much worse if it was not accurate or the story incomplete.

               

              I dont know whether others in my family regret watching, we haven't discuss yet. That is odd in itself retrospectively.

              Thanks for raising this to think about.

               

              I add to the emotions of sadness, helplessness, anger and shock, the desire for the truth. 

              Their sacrifice has benefited us in many ways, and I think they would want us to know and not let anything go unnoticed.

              Thanks

               

              Mark T.
              Canada

               

              From: Dan Ford <cub06h@...>
              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2013 5:55:37 AM
              Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: KATYN the film by Wajda - a question.

               

              What was particularly punishing is that the actual shootings are put off
              to the very end, so you begin to believe that you have been spared the
              details.

              I have read just about everything available on the Katyn massacres, and
              it's obvious that Mr Wajda has done so as well. I think it is as close a
              re-creation of the event at Goat Hills as anyone will ever do.

              Altogether, it's a riveting and wonderful film that also tells a lot
              about what it was like to live in a Communist puppet state for all those
              years after the War.

              (Actually, it was the very first scene that brought tears to my eyes, as
              the young mother hurries across a bridge only to meet other people
              rushing in the opposite direction, one set fleeing the Germans, the
              other fleeing the Russians. She might have been the matronly lady that I
              knew in London in the 1950s, who'd managed to escape the despots by way
              of Kazakhstan, Persia, Lebanon, and Egypt.

              -- Dan Ford US

            • annapacewicz
              Hi I would say from my perspective that having the shootings at the end of the film represents the fact that for 70 years the world did not categorically know
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 15, 2013
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                Hi I would say from my perspective that having the shootings at the end of the film represents the fact that for 70 years the world did not categorically know that the Soviets were responsible. I grew up with 'a grandfather who went missing in the war' and it was not until after 1990 that we said 'he was killed by the soviets at Katyn'.The shootings at the end of the film is the closure of our knowledge, the closure on Katyn.To me the ending was shocking and confronting but from a story telling view point, makes total sense.Best regards Anna Pacewicz Sydney
              • Lenarda Szymczak
                I agree, Lenarda, Australia From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of annapacewicz@yahoo.com.au Sent: Sunday, 15
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 15, 2013
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                  I agree,

                  Lenarda, Australia

                   

                  From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of annapacewicz@...
                  Sent: Sunday, 15 September 2013 5:03 PM
                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] RE: KATYN the film by Wajda - a question.

                   

                   

                  Hi I would say from my perspective that having the shootings at the end of the film represents the fact that for 70 years the world did not categorically know that the Soviets were responsible. I grew up with 'a grandfather who went missing in the war' and it was not until after 1990 that we said 'he was killed by the soviets at Katyn'. The shootings at the end of the film is the closure of our knowledge, the closure on Katyn. To me the ending was shocking and confronting but from a story telling view point, makes total sense. Best regards Anna Pacewicz Sydney

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