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Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Essentials of a prisoner..

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  • Stefan Wisniowski
    Let s put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts! Who else has or knows of any? Best regards Stefan Wisniowski Sydney Australia ... Let s put
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 10 1:04 PM
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      Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts!  Who else has or knows of any?

      Best regards
      Stefan Wisniowski
      Sydney Australia 

      On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:

       

      

      Hania,
       
      I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.
       
      Best wishes,
       
      Basia (UK)
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM
      Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]

       

      I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes.  They also learned to make thread from old socks .  In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army.  To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I  understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one  understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.
      hania

    • terry polewski
      Stefan,   your timing couldn t be better to vindicate me. I am moving and this past weekend when I was storing 2 things of dziadzia s that I have hung onto my
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 10 2:32 PM
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        Stefan,
         
        your timing couldn't be better to vindicate me. I am moving and this past weekend when I was storing 2 things of dziadzia's that I have hung onto my mother was asking why I was still lugging them around. I had to tell her they were things any collector would die for - though that is purely my opinion and not necessarily tested!
        The first item is his army ruck sack with hand painted personal identifiers and the second is a footlocker made out of a metal artillery shell box again with his II Polish Corps #'s.
        Hopefully these are the odd things you might include in a collection.
         
        Terry Polewski
        Windsor, Canada



        Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts!  Who else has or knows of any?

        Best regards
        Stefan Wisniowski
        Sydney Australia 

        On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:

         
        
        Hania,
         
        I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.
         
        Best wishes,
         
        Basia (UK)
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM
        Subject: [http://www.kresy-siberia.org/] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]

         
        I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes.  They also learned to make thread from old socks .  In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army.  To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I  understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one  understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.
        hania




      • Lenarda Szymczak
        Great idea, could we perhaps have it displayed in one of the local Polish clubs under the name of Kresy-Siberia Group with our web site link. Each country
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 10 2:50 PM
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          Great idea, could we perhaps have it displayed in one of the local Polish clubs under the name of Kresy-Siberia Group with our web site link.   Each country could choose their own local club and at the same time photograph these artefacts for KSVM.

          Warmest regards,

          Lenarda, Sydney, Australia

           

          From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Stefan Wisniowski
          Sent: Thursday, 11 April, 2013 6:05 AM
          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Essentials of a prisoner..

           

           

          Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts!  Who else has or knows of any?

          Best regards

          Stefan Wisniowski

          Sydney Australia 


          On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:

           

          

          Hania,

           

          I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.

           

          Best wishes,

           

          Basia (UK)

          ----- Original Message -----

          Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM

          Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]

           

           

          I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes.  They also learned to make thread from old socks .  In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army.  To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I  understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one  understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.

          hania

        • Anne Kaczanowski
          When my dad died, he would have had no idea how much the little battered, brown, army box he left behind would motivate me to start a 20 year journey into his
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 10 5:46 PM
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          When my dad died, he would have had no idea how much the little battered, brown, army box he left behind would motivate me to start a 20 year journey into his past.  When he died I couldn't read or write Polish....this box pushed me into a search I could never have imagined. Not only did I learn more about his family and his past, the war, the deportations, the imprisonment, the gulags, the injustice ....but now I can read and write Polish. So my little box of memorbilia is important to no one.....but when I look at it, or touch it,  it represents 74 years and the greatest motivator I ever could have come across in my life. One night when writing my family's history I was locked into the face of my dad's sister on the computer.  I knew very little about her and she had no children and there was nobody left to answer any questions for me. The door in the room unexpectedly slammed shut behind me as I stared into her computer image and I was strangely drawn to the army box for some unknown reason.  I had in my possession the army box for years so it wasn't anything new to me. But for all the years I had the box I couldn't read or write in Polish. Now my Polish was at an elementary level.  I went with the feeling to the box and inside,  I found a letter that had been written to my dad from his sister. The one whose face I had been staring into for an hour asking what had happened in her life.  When she was 58 years old she wrote probably her last letter to my dad and in this letter she told her life story.  Almost everything I wanted to know was in this letter. This is one incident I hold dear to my heart but it was just the beginning of so many more miraculous pieces of the puzzle that came to life from my search. When I questioned the arrival in Pahlevi.....the box drew me in again and I found a tiny notebook specifically noting when my dad left Russia and how long the trip was to Pahlevi. He wrote notes on his trip to Jerusalem......wrote the words to Volga, Volga.  Words that once meant nothing were all of a sudden coming into a life of their own. I also have the Pope's certificate to Polish soldiers in Rome.  I can't help but think of all the stuff that was left behind by people who died and seemed so insignificant. There is a story in everything if one just takes the time to look at these things.  Another thing I have is a Jerusalem medal, that I have worn all my life....and it came from the time when the soldiers visited Jerusalem and picked up trinkets and postcards, which my dad also kept. Who knew?  And my latest army records that I recieved tell me exactly  just when my dad went to Jerusalem and would have bought the medal. So again...to some this means nothing...but when you are searching or perhaps trying to hold on to a piece of the past....these little pieces of information can mean alot. I urge everyone who has anything left...to treasure it.
           I would never give up this little brown box....but there will come a day when it is insignificant to everyone. 
           
          hania

          From: terry polewski <tpolewski@...>
          To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 3:32:17 PM
          Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re- Essentials of a prisoner..
           

          Stefan,
           
          your timing couldn't be better to vindicate me. I am moving and this past weekend when I was storing 2 things of dziadzia's that I have hung onto my mother was asking why I was still lugging them around. I had to tell her they were things any collector would die for - though that is purely my opinion and not necessarily tested!
          The first item is his army ruck sack with hand painted personal identifiers and the second is a footlocker made out of a metal artillery shell box again with his II Polish Corps #'s.
          Hopefully these are the odd things you might include in a collection.
           
          Terry Polewski
          Windsor, Canada


          Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts!  Who else has or knows of any? Best regards
          Stefan Wisniowski
          Sydney Australia 
          On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:
           
          
          Hania,
           
          I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.
           
          Best wishes,
           
          Basia (UK)
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM
          Subject: [http://www.kresy-siberia.org/] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]

           
          I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes.  They also learned to make thread from old socks .  In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army.  To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I  understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one  understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.
          hania
        • Lenarda Szymczak
          Hania, you have reached inside me and I understand you, as similar events have happened in my life, suppose it is part of being Polish, Slavic born, our DNA,
          Message 5 of 11 , Apr 10 6:13 PM
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            Hania, you have reached inside me and I understand you, as similar events have happened in my life, suppose it is part of being Polish, Slavic born, our DNA, our genetic structure.  Unfortunately I left my father at a very young age and event though, I remember his army coat, the buttons, his sergeants stripes, I was never able to keep anything apart from a photo or two and this cuts me open with remorse, every time a member puts forward even a simple piece of writing, a broken piece of memorabilia, especially the remembering, not having and losing of these simple but precious pieces of him, his life, his history, an object he actually touched and held in his hand.   He is deceased now 30 years and I have nothing left, except the pictures in my mind, which I can show to no one, only speak of them to his grandchildren who were born in a free country and do not fully understand and would love to touch and hold something of their grandfather. Please please members of group, treasure what you have and as Hania writes, it will be wanted and treasured and needed by history in the future and will become the most valuable piece of broken artefact to be in your possession.  We are losing so much so quickly, hang on to whatever you have and protect it.

            Warmest wishes

            Lenarda, Australia

             

            From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Anne Kaczanowski
            Sent: Thursday, 11 April, 2013 10:46 AM
            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re- Essentials of a prisoner.. [2 Attachments]

             

             

            [Attachment(s) from Anne Kaczanowski included below]

            When my dad died, he would have had no idea how much the little battered, brown, army box he left behind would motivate me to start a 20 year journey into his past.  When he died I couldn't read or write Polish....this box pushed me into a search I could never have imagined. Not only did I learn more about his family and his past, the war, the deportations, the imprisonment, the gulags, the injustice ....but now I can read and write Polish. So my little box of memorbilia is important to no one.....but when I look at it, or touch it,  it represents 74 years and the greatest motivator I ever could have come across in my life. One night when writing my family's history I was locked into the face of my dad's sister on the computer.  I knew very little about her and she had no children and there was nobody left to answer any questions for me. The door in the room unexpectedly slammed shut behind me as I stared into her computer image and I was strangely drawn to the army box for some unknown reason.  I had in my possession the army box for years so it wasn't anything new to me. But for all the years I had the box I couldn't read or write in Polish. Now my Polish was at an elementary level.  I went with the feeling to the box and inside,  I found a letter that had been written to my dad from his sister. The one whose face I had been staring into for an hour asking what had happened in her life.  When she was 58 years old she wrote probably her last letter to my dad and in this letter she told her life story.  Almost everything I wanted to know was in this letter. This is one incident I hold dear to my heart but it was just the beginning of so many more miraculous pieces of the puzzle that came to life from my search. When I questioned the arrival in Pahlevi.....the box drew me in again and I found a tiny notebook specifically noting when my dad left Russia and how long the trip was to Pahlevi. He wrote notes on his trip to Jerusalem......wrote the words to Volga, Volga.  Words that once meant nothing were all of a sudden coming into a life of their own. I also have the Pope's certificate to Polish soldiers in Rome.  I can't help but think of all the stuff that was left behind by people who died and seemed so insignificant. There is a story in everything if one just takes the time to look at these things.  Another thing I have is a Jerusalem medal, that I have worn all my life....and it came from the time when the soldiers visited Jerusalem and picked up trinkets and postcards, which my dad also kept. Who knew?  And my latest army records that I recieved tell me exactly  just when my dad went to Jerusalem and would have bought the medal. So again...to some this means nothing...but when you are searching or perhaps trying to hold on to a piece of the past....these little pieces of information can mean alot. I urge everyone who has anything left...to treasure it.

             I would never give up this little brown box....but there will come a day when it is insignificant to everyone. 

             

            hania

             

            From: terry polewski <tpolewski@...>
            To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 3:32:17 PM
            Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re- Essentials of a prisoner..

             

             

            Stefan,

             

            your timing couldn't be better to vindicate me. I am moving and this past weekend when I was storing 2 things of dziadzia's that I have hung onto my mother was asking why I was still lugging them around. I had to tell her they were things any collector would die for - though that is purely my opinion and not necessarily tested!

            The first item is his army ruck sack with hand painted personal identifiers and the second is a footlocker made out of a metal artillery shell box again with his II Polish Corps #'s.

            Hopefully these are the odd things you might include in a collection.

             

            Terry Polewski

            Windsor, Canada

             

            Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts!  Who else has or knows of any?Best regards

            Stefan Wisniowski

            Sydney Australia 

            On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:

             

            

            Hania,

             

            I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.

             

            Best wishes,

             

            Basia (UK)

            ----- Original Message -----

            Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM

            Subject: [http://www.kresy-siberia.org/] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]

             

             

            I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes.  They also learned to make thread from old socks .  In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army.  To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I  understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one  understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.

            hania

          • Mark
            Nice Hania. I get everything you describe. As we mature we need to look for the right home for these things. Mark T. Canada From: Anne Kaczanowski
            Message 6 of 11 , Apr 10 7:27 PM
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              Nice Hania.
              I get everything you describe.
              As we mature we need to look for the right home for these things.
               
              Mark T.
              Canada
              From: Anne Kaczanowski <kazameena@...>
              To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 8:46:21 PM
              Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re- Essentials of a prisoner.. [2 Attachments]
               
              When my dad died, he would have had no idea how much the little battered, brown, army box he left behind would motivate me to start a 20 year journey into his past.  When he died I couldn't read or write Polish....this box pushed me into a search I could never have imagined. Not only did I learn more about his family and his past, the war, the deportations, the imprisonment, the gulags, the injustice ....but now I can read and write Polish. So my little box of memorbilia is important to no one.....but when I look at it, or touch it,  it represents 74 years and the greatest motivator I ever could have come across in my life. One night when writing my family's history I was locked into the face of my dad's sister on the computer.  I knew very little about her and she had no children and there was nobody left to answer any questions for me. The door in the room unexpectedly slammed shut behind me as I stared into her computer image and I was strangely drawn to the army box for some unknown reason.  I had in my possession the army box for years so it wasn't anything new to me. But for all the years I had the box I couldn't read or write in Polish. Now my Polish was at an elementary level.  I went with the feeling to the box and inside,  I found a letter that had been written to my dad from his sister. The one whose face I had been staring into for an hour asking what had happened in her life.  When she was 58 years old she wrote probably her last letter to my dad and in this letter she told her life story.  Almost everything I wanted to know was in this letter. This is one incident I hold dear to my heart but it was just the beginning of so many more miraculous pieces of the puzzle that came to life from my search. When I questioned the arrival in Pahlevi.....the box drew me in again and I found a tiny notebook specifically noting when my dad left Russia and how long the trip was to Pahlevi. He wrote notes on his trip to Jerusalem......wrote the words to Volga, Volga.  Words that once meant nothing were all of a sudden coming into a life of their own. I also have the Pope's certificate to Polish soldiers in Rome.  I can't help but think of all the stuff that was left behind by people who died and seemed so insignificant. There is a story in everything if one just takes the time to look at these things.  Another thing I have is a Jerusalem medal, that I have worn all my life....and it came from the time when the soldiers visited Jerusalem and picked up trinkets and postcards, which my dad also kept. Who knew?  And my latest army records that I recieved tell me exactly  just when my dad went to Jerusalem and would have bought the medal. So again...to some this means nothing...but when you are searching or perhaps trying to hold on to a piece of the past....these little pieces of information can mean alot. I urge everyone who has anything left...to treasure it.
               I would never give up this little brown box....but there will come a day when it is insignificant to everyone. 
               
              hania

              From: terry polewski <tpolewski@...>
              To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 3:32:17 PM
              Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re- Essentials of a prisoner..
               

              Stefan,
               
              your timing couldn't be better to vindicate me. I am moving and this past weekend when I was storing 2 things of dziadzia's that I have hung onto my mother was asking why I was still lugging them around. I had to tell her they were things any collector would die for - though that is purely my opinion and not necessarily tested!
              The first item is his army ruck sack with hand painted personal identifiers and the second is a footlocker made out of a metal artillery shell box again with his II Polish Corps #'s.
              Hopefully these are the odd things you might include in a collection.
               
              Terry Polewski
              Windsor, Canada


              Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts!  Who else has or knows of any? Best regards
              Stefan Wisniowski
              Sydney Australia 
              On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:
               
              
              Hania,
               
              I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.
               
              Best wishes,
               
              Basia (UK)
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM
              Subject: [http://www.kresy-siberia.org/] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]

               
              I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes.  They also learned to make thread from old socks .  In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army.  To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I  understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one  understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.
              hania
            • Carol Hornby Clements
              I have a series of well worn religious postcards that my grandfather carried around with him. He used to make rings from silver spoons and copy military
              Message 7 of 11 , Apr 11 3:14 AM
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                I have a series of well worn religious postcards that my grandfather carried around with him. He used to make rings from silver spoons and copy military ribbons to sell. I have some fragments.
                I also have some glass slides i brought home in 1990 after he died. They were stored in our attic. I must find them, there might be clues.
                Carol UK

                Carol C H C
                Sent from my iPad

                On 11 Apr 2013, at 03:27, Mark <turkiewiczm@...> wrote:

                Nice Hania.
                I get everything you describe.
                As we mature we need to look for the right home for these things.
                 
                Mark T.
                Canada
                From: Anne Kaczanowski <kazameena@...>
                To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 8:46:21 PM
                Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re- Essentials of a prisoner.. [2 Attachments]
                 
                When my dad died, he would have had no idea how much the little battered, brown, army box he left behind would motivate me to start a 20 year journey into his past.  When he died I couldn't read or write Polish....this box pushed me into a search I could never have imagined. Not only did I learn more about his family and his past, the war, the deportations, the imprisonment, the gulags, the injustice ....but now I can read and write Polish. So my little box of memorbilia is important to no one.....but when I look at it, or touch it,  it represents 74 years and the greatest motivator I ever could have come across in my life. One night when writing my family's history I was locked into the face of my dad's sister on the computer.  I knew very little about her and she had no children and there was nobody left to answer any questions for me. The door in the room unexpectedly slammed shut behind me as I stared into her computer image and I was strangely drawn to the army box for some unknown reason.  I had in my possession the army box for years so it wasn't anything new to me. But for all the years I had the box I couldn't read or write in Polish. Now my Polish was at an elementary level.  I went with the feeling to the box and inside,  I found a letter that had been written to my dad from his sister. The one whose face I had been staring into for an hour asking what had happened in her life.  When she was 58 years old she wrote probably her last letter to my dad and in this letter she told her life story.  Almost everything I wanted to know was in this letter. This is one incident I hold dear to my heart but it was just the beginning of so many more miraculous pieces of the puzzle that came to life from my search. When I questioned the arrival in Pahlevi.....the box drew me in again and I found a tiny notebook specifically noting when my dad left Russia and how long the trip was to Pahlevi. He wrote notes on his trip to Jerusalem......wrote the words to Volga, Volga.  Words that once meant nothing were all of a sudden coming into a life of their own. I also have the Pope's certificate to Polish soldiers in Rome.  I can't help but think of all the stuff that was left behind by people who died and seemed so insignificant. There is a story in everything if one just takes the time to look at these things.  Another thing I have is a Jerusalem medal, that I have worn all my life....and it came from the time when the soldiers visited Jerusalem and picked up trinkets and postcards, which my dad also kept. Who knew?  And my latest army records that I recieved tell me exactly  just when my dad went to Jerusalem and would have bought the medal. So again...to some this means nothing...but when you are searching or perhaps trying to hold on to a piece of the past....these little pieces of information can mean alot. I urge everyone who has anything left...to treasure it.
                 I would never give up this little brown box....but there will come a day when it is insignificant to everyone. 
                 
                hania

                From: terry polewski <tpolewski@...>
                To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 3:32:17 PM
                Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re- Essentials of a prisoner..
                 

                Stefan,
                 
                your timing couldn't be better to vindicate me. I am moving and this past weekend when I was storing 2 things of dziadzia's that I have hung onto my mother was asking why I was still lugging them around. I had to tell her they were things any collector would die for - though that is purely my opinion and not necessarily tested!
                The first item is his army ruck sack with hand painted personal identifiers and the second is a footlocker made out of a metal artillery shell box again with his II Polish Corps #'s.
                Hopefully these are the odd things you might include in a collection.
                 
                Terry Polewski
                Windsor, Canada


                Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts!  Who else has or knows of any? Best regards
                Stefan Wisniowski
                Sydney Australia 
                On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:
                 
                
                Hania,
                 
                I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.
                 
                Best wishes,
                 
                Basia (UK)
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM
                Subject: [http://www.kresy-siberia.org/] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]

                 
                I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes.  They also learned to make thread from old socks .  In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army.  To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I  understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one  understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.
                hania
              • Anne Kaczanowski
                It s funny because when I went through my dad s wallet...he had an address for a friend here in Canada...but below the man s name was written his phone number
                Message 8 of 11 , Apr 11 7:18 AM
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                  It's funny because when I went through my dad's wallet...he had an address for a friend here in Canada...but below the man's name was written his phone number ....and date of arrival in Pahlevi and what time.......and what ship ( Sea Robin)he came to Canada on in November 1946..
                  Looking at this just now, I just realized it gives me another date and time of a ship arrival in Pahlevi...
                   
                  It said " Przyjechali do Pachlewi dnia 11-8-1942  godzina 12:45 po poludniu"....
                   
                   This is an August entry...irrelevant to the spring ships....but I wonder why he kept this.  Since I have the phone number I may have to follow this up and see if someone still exists on the other end who cares about this information. This could be a gift for someone else. 
                   
                  hania

                  From: Carol Hornby Clements <craftyccc@...>
                  To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, April 11, 2013 4:14:46 AM
                  Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re- Essentials of a prisoner..
                   
                  I have a series of well worn religious postcards that my grandfather carried around with him. He used to make rings from silver spoons and copy military ribbons to sell. I have some fragments.
                  I also have some glass slides i brought home in 1990 after he died. They were stored in our attic. I must find them, there might be clues.
                  Carol UK
                  Carol C H C
                  Sent from my iPad
                  On 11 Apr 2013, at 03:27, Mark <turkiewiczm@...> wrote:
                  Nice Hania.
                  I get everything you describe.
                  As we mature we need to look for the right home for these things.
                   
                  Mark T. Canada
                  From: Anne Kaczanowski <kazameena@...>
                  To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 8:46:21 PM
                  Subject: Re: [http://www.kresy-siberia.org/] Re- Essentials of a prisoner.. [2 Attachments]
                   
                  When my dad died, he would have had no idea how much the little battered, brown, army box he left behind would motivate me to start a 20 year journey into his past.  When he died I couldn't read or write Polish....this box pushed me into a search I could never have imagined. Not only did I learn more about his family and his past, the war, the deportations, the imprisonment, the gulags, the injustice ....but now I can read and write Polish. So my little box of memorbilia is important to no one.....but when I look at it, or touch it,  it represents 74 years and the greatest motivator I ever could have come across in my life. One night when writing my family's history I was locked into the face of my dad's sister on the computer.  I knew very little about her and she had no children and there was nobody left to answer any questions for me. The door in the room unexpectedly slammed shut behind me as I stared into her computer image and I was strangely drawn to the army box for some unknown reason.  I had in my possession the army box for years so it wasn't anything new to me. But for all the years I had the box I couldn't read or write in Polish. Now my Polish was at an elementary level.  I went with the feeling to the box and inside,  I found a letter that had been written to my dad from his sister. The one whose face I had been staring into for an hour asking what had happened in her life.  When she was 58 years old she wrote probably her last letter to my dad and in this letter she told her life story.  Almost everything I wanted to know was in this letter. This is one incident I hold dear to my heart but it was just the beginning of so many more miraculous pieces of the puzzle that came to life from my search. When I questioned the arrival in Pahlevi.....the box drew me in again and I found a tiny notebook specifically noting when my dad left Russia and how long the trip was to Pahlevi. He wrote notes on his trip to Jerusalem......wrote the words to Volga, Volga.  Words that once meant nothing were all of a sudden coming into a life of their own. I also have the Pope's certificate to Polish soldiers in Rome.  I can't help but think of all the stuff that was left behind by people who died and seemed so insignificant. There is a story in everything if one just takes the time to look at these things.  Another thing I have is a Jerusalem medal, that I have worn all my life....and it came from the time when the soldiers visited Jerusalem and picked up trinkets and postcards, which my dad also kept. Who knew?  And my latest army records that I recieved tell me exactly  just when my dad went to Jerusalem and would have bought the medal. So again...to some this means nothing...but when you are searching or perhaps trying to hold on to a piece of the past....these little pieces of information can mean alot. I urge everyone who has anything left...to treasure it.
                   I would never give up this little brown box....but there will come a day when it is insignificant to everyone. 
                   
                  hania

                  From: terry polewski <tpolewski@...>
                  To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 3:32:17 PM
                  Subject: [http://www.kresy-siberia.org/] Re- Essentials of a prisoner..
                   

                  Stefan,
                   
                  your timing couldn't be better to vindicate me. I am moving and this past weekend when I was storing 2 things of dziadzia's that I have hung onto my mother was asking why I was still lugging them around. I had to tell her they were things any collector would die for - though that is purely my opinion and not necessarily tested!
                  The first item is his army ruck sack with hand painted personal identifiers and the second is a footlocker made out of a metal artillery shell box again with his II Polish Corps #'s.
                  Hopefully these are the odd things you might include in a collection.
                   
                  Terry Polewski
                  Windsor, Canada


                  Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts!  Who else has or knows of any? Best regards
                  Stefan Wisniowski
                  Sydney Australia 
                  On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:
                   
                  
                  Hania,
                   
                  I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.
                   
                  Best wishes,
                   
                  Basia (UK)
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM
                  Subject: [http://www.kresy-siberia.org/] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]

                   
                  I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes.  They also learned to make thread from old socks .  In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army.  To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I  understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one  understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.
                  hania
                • Andrzej w Buffalo
                  Perhaps artifacts such as these could be integrated into an exhibit such as Wygnancy (The Expelled). Description in English:
                  Message 9 of 11 , Apr 11 8:58 AM
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                    Perhaps artifacts such as these could be integrated into an exhibit such as "Wygnancy" (The Expelled).

                    Description in English:
                    http://ipn.gov.pl/en/news/2008/the-expelled-exhibition-presented-in-european-parliament-b

                    Description in Polish:
                    http://ipn.gov.pl/aktualnosci/2012/centrala/wystawa-wygnancy-warszawa,-22-listopada-5-grudnia-2012

                    Andy Golebiowski
                    Buffalo, N.Y.
                    U.S.A.

                    --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Wisniowski <stefan.wisniowski@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Let's put together a special exhibition of wartime artefacts! Who else has or knows of any?
                    >
                    > Best regards
                    > Stefan Wisniowski
                    > Sydney Australia
                    >
                    > On 11/04/2013, at 3:37, "Barbara M." <bwbm5@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > 
                    > >
                    > > Hania,
                    > >
                    > > I have some of my Father's sewing kit - one of those wooden"mushrooms" for mending socks. It was Army Issue by the British.
                    > >
                    > > Best wishes,
                    > >
                    > > Basia (UK)
                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > From: Anne Kaczanowski
                    > > To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:09 PM
                    > > Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Essentials of a prisoner.. [1 Attachment]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > I just read where prisoners learned to make buttons from bits of chewed bread in order to hold their clothes up and made needles from fish bones, to use stray threads for sewing up holes ripped in their clothes. They also learned to make thread from old socks . In my dad’s army box I found a needle, thread and extra buttons…..that he seemed to want to keep long after the army. To someone else this is just a sewing kit but because I understand where he came from……and from reading these stories….it makes one understand how important simple things like a needle and thread and a couple of buttons can be.
                    > > hania
                    > >
                    >
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