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Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Introducing new member Rafal Zawadzki from Lbiska, Poland

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  • Stefan Wisniowski
    Did I read correctly born in 1937? That is consistent is it not? Might be a good chance it is the same person. Rafal can you share the Red Cross info? UK
    Message 1 of 37 , Jan 9, 2013
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      Did I read correctly born in 1937?   That is consistent is it not? Might be a good chance it is the same person.

      Rafal can you share the Red Cross info?

      UK members can you check for Zawadzki families? Do the Pikes from India know her?

      Best regards
      Stefan Wisniowski
      Sydney Australia 

      On 10/01/2013, at 1:50, Helen Bitner <helen.bitner@...> wrote:

       

      Dear Group
      Please welcome new member Rafal who is researching for his aunt Krystyna Zawadzka born in Kovel (former Poland, now Ukraine) on 15th of Feb 1937. She was a daughter of Stefan and Rozalia. Stefan was a brother of Rafal's grandfather and he was a State Policeman, arrested by the Soviet NKWD in Sept 1939, then imprisoned in Ostaschkov lager and finally murdered at the end of April 1940 in Tver (USSR). His body is buried in a massive grave together with more than 6,000 other bodies of Polish policemen, prison guards, clerks etc. in Miednoye (now Russia).

      Rafal's family know about Stefan's fate due to some documents released by Russia some years ago, but they don't have any information about his wife Rozalia and their daughter Krystyna, with whom the contact was broken about 1939/1940. It was thought, they were taken to Siberia like other members of policemen's families and probably lost there.

      Two days ago Rafal received from the Polish Red Cross information that a Krystyna Zawadzka born 1937, a Polish orphan, arrived in Canada in 1949. and eventually settled in the United Kingdom. Rafal thinks this is perhaps another Krystyna Zawadzka because she was born in 1937? However if there is any probability that she is their family member who was lost 70 years ago the Zawadzki family would be overjoyed.

      Rafal, we do have a Krystyna Zawadzka on our Wall Of Names in the Kresy-Siberia Virtual Museum but there is little information other than she was a refugee in India and born in 1937.
      My very best wishes for success in your researches
      Kind regards
      Helen Bitner
      Colchester
      UK

    • Eva
      Just a reminder that author/historian Halik Kochanski will be speaking at the National Army Museum in London next week on Thursday 24 January - please see
      Message 37 of 37 , Jan 18, 2013
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        Just a reminder that author/historian Halik Kochanski will be speaking at the National Army Museum in London next week on Thursday 24 January - please see http://www.nam.ac.uk/whats-on/lunchtime-lectures/eagle-unbowed-poland-poles-second-world-war

        Halik will also be signing copies of her book at the Kresy-Siberia stand at Who Do You Think You Are? Live in Olympia on Friday 22 February - www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com

        This year the theme for the event is Migration and K-S has been selected to do a workshop talk on Polish Resettlement Camps in the UK on Friday 22 February at 11.30 am with our friend and historian Agata Blaszczyk-Sawyer from UCL and K-S member Zosia Biegus.

        It is hoped that K-S members will help support the UK team by volunteering to man our stand during the 3-day event on 22-24 February or by providing financial support towards our presence there - www.tinyurl.com/Kresy-Siberia-UK.

        Anyone wishing to attend as a visitor to the exhibition can take advantage of special 2 for £25 tickets by quoting code EXB2425 when booking in advance.

        I hope many members will attend and show support for our very important and worthwhile cause in promoting the Kresy-Siberia Virtual Museum to a wide audience. Please get in touch if you are able to help out in any way that you can.

        Best regards.
        Eva Szegidewicz
        Director, Kresy-Siberia (UK)


        --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, Krystyna Mew wrote:
        >
        > An excellent book.  Just finished reading it.  It helped put all my rather fragmented pieces of Polish WW2 history knowledge into some semblance of order.   I really recommend this book.
        > Krystyna Mew
        >
        > Father: Edward
        > Henrik Herzbaum (Hartry).
        > Assimilated Polish
        > Jew.  1920-1967.
        > Arrested:  Lwow June 1940.
        > Volgalag Camp,
        > near Rybinsk. Yaroslavl Region.
        > 2nd Polish Corps.  5th Kresowa Infantry.
        > Settled in the UK.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > >________________________________
        > > From: Krys Dobrzanski
        > >To: K-S Group
        > >Sent: Friday, January 18, 2013 9:31 PM
        > >Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] New Hardback Book available in the UK
        > >
        > >
        > > 
        > >Dear Group,
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >Amazon informed me of a new book called - 
        > >
        > >"The Eagle Unbowed: Poland and the Poles in the Second World War" by Halik Kochanski. I believe it will be relevant to our research and is available in the UK at the moment and will be published in the USA later this year. I apologise if this book has already been mentioned.
        > >
        > >
        > >The link for the UK is   http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1846143543/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00 and the publisher's review is pasted below.
        > >
        > >
        > >With warmest wishes,
        > >
        > >
        > >Krys (Dobrzanska - researching Starzak, Gierula, Khlyuchanka lumber camp)
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >In Halik Kochanski's extraordinary book, the untold story of Poland and the Poles in the Second World War is finally heard
        > >By almost every measure the fate of the inhabitants of Poland was the most terrible of any group in the Second World War. Following the destruction of its armed forces in the autumn of 1939, the Republic of Poland was partitioned between Nazi and Soviet forces and officially ceased to exist. Racial violence and ideological conformity were at the very heart of the new regimes. As the war progressed millions of Poles were killed, with each phase unleashing a further round, from the industrialised genocide of Treblinka to the crushing of the Warsaw Rising. Polish Jews were all to be murdered, Christians reduced to a semi-literate slave class.
        > >In this powerful and original new book Halik Kochanski has written perhaps the most important 'missing' work on the whole conflict: an attempt in a single volume to describe both the fate of those trapped within occupied Poland and of those millions of Poles who were able to escape.
        > >,_._,___
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
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