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The Lost Requiem

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  • Mark and Oyun
    Documentary about Polish refugees in Iran by Khosrow Sinai. Dear Group, We mentioned this film earlier in the year. Well, I stumbled upon it on Youtube while
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 2, 2012
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      Documentary about Polish refugees in Iran by Khosrow Sinai.

      Dear Group,

      We mentioned this film earlier in the year. Well, I stumbled upon it on Youtube while looking for something else; isn't it
      always the way?! I don't think anyone has posted the link so here goes:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-C_U2nE3hA0

      It's in English and worth a look...all 1hr38mins.It's only had 56 views.

      Regards, Mark Ostrowski
    • John Halucha
      Thanks very much for the links to the youtube videos, Mark. At about 14:40 of The Lost Requiem, an old photographer who had taken pictures of those refugees
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 8, 2012
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        Thanks very much for the links to the youtube videos, Mark.

        At about 14:40 of The Lost Requiem, an "old photographer who had taken pictures of those refugees" says, "About 25 years ago, it had been snowing for 5 days. There had been a heavy snow. We got up in the morning and saw some ships were bringing Poles here to Pahlavi."
        This sounds as though it would have been the beginning of the first mass transport from the USSR, which landed March 25, 1942, rather than the August transports. Snow high up on surrounding mountains would not be a surprise in March, but this is the first I heard of snow in Pahlavi itself on the shore of the Caspian Sea in March 1942. Do you (or anyone) have further information on the weather there at that time?

        In Bo Wolnosc Krzyzami Sie Mierzy (another link from you, thanks Mark) at about 14:19 of Part 1, the narrator says, " ... trochę obcym w tych angielskich hełmach naleśnikach..." which I understand as, "... a little strange in these English pancake helmets ..."
        My question to you and the group: is "hełmach naleśnikach" a description by the film's writer, or was it a term in common use at the time by the Polish soldiers outfitted in British uniforms?

        John Halucha
        Sault Ste Marie, Canada


        From: Mark and Oyun <mark_oyun@...>
        To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, November 2, 2012 5:25:00 PM
        Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] The Lost Requiem

         
        Documentary about Polish refugees in Iran by Khosrow Sinai.

        Dear Group,

        We mentioned this film earlier in the year. Well, I stumbled upon it on Youtube while looking for something else; isn't it
        always the way?! I don't think anyone has posted the link so here goes:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-C_U2nE3hA0

        It's in English and worth a look...all 1hr38mins.It's only had 56 views.

        Regards, Mark Ostrowski

      • Mark and Oyun
        Dear John I learnt something today. Snow was possible in March. http://weatherspark.com/averages/32807/Rasht-Gilan-Iran Regards, Mark
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 8, 2012
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          Dear John
          I learnt something today. Snow was possible in March.

          http://weatherspark.com/averages/32807/Rasht-Gilan-Iran

          Regards, Mark


          --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks very much for the links to the youtube videos, Mark.
          >
          > At about 14:40 of The Lost Requiem, an "old photographer who
          > had taken pictures of those refugees" says, "About 25 years ago,
          > it had been snowing for 5 days. There had been a heavy snow. We got
          > up in the morning and saw some ships were bringing Poles here to
          > Pahlavi."
          > This sounds as though it would have been the beginning of the first mass transport from the USSR, which landed March 25, 1942, rather than the August transports. Snow high up on surrounding mountains would not be a surprise in March, but this is the first I heard of snow in Pahlavi itself on the shore of the Caspian Sea in March 1942. Do you (or anyone) have further information on the weather there at that time?
          >
          > In Bo Wolnosc Krzyzami Sie Mierzy (another link from you, thanks Mark) at about 14:19 of Part 1, the narrator says, " ... trochę
          > obcym w tych angielskich hełmach naleśnikach..." which I understand as, "... a little
          > strange in these English pancake helmets ..."
          > My question to you and the group: is "hełmach naleśnikach" a description by the film's writer, or was it a term in common use at the time by the Polish soldiers outfitted in British uniforms?
          >
          > John Halucha
          > Sault Ste Marie, Canada
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Mark and Oyun <mark_oyun@...>
          > To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Friday, November 2, 2012 5:25:00 PM
          > Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] The Lost Requiem
          >
          >
          >  
          > Documentary about Polish refugees in Iran by Khosrow Sinai.
          >
          > Dear Group,
          >
          > We mentioned this film earlier in the year. Well, I stumbled upon it on Youtube while looking for something else; isn't it
          > always the way?! I don't think anyone has posted the link so here goes:
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-C_U2nE3hA0
          >
          > It's in English and worth a look...all 1hr38mins.It's only had 56 views.
          >
          > Regards, Mark Ostrowski
          >
        • John Halucha
          Thanks for this, Mark. Actually, I believed the man speaking in the video and accepted that snow was possible in Pahlavi in March (though it is super to have
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 8, 2012
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            Thanks for this, Mark.
            Actually, I believed the man speaking in the video and accepted that snow was possible in Pahlavi in March (though it is super to have it verified) but was wondering if anyone had other reports about the weather in the area at the time.
            John Halucha
            Sault Ste Marie, Canada


            From: Mark and Oyun <mark_oyun@...>
            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 1:36:16 PM
            Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Snow and nalesniki [was, The Lost Requiem and Wolnosc Krzyzami...]

             
            Dear John
            I learnt something today. Snow was possible in March.

            http://weatherspark.com/averages/32807/Rasht-Gilan-Iran

            Regards, Mark

            --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks very much for the links to the youtube videos, Mark.
            >
            > At about 14:40 of The Lost Requiem, an "old photographer who
            > had taken pictures of those refugees" says, "About 25 years ago,
            > it had been snowing for 5 days. There had been a heavy snow. We got
            > up in the morning and saw some ships were bringing Poles here to
            > Pahlavi."
            > This sounds as though it would have been the beginning of the first mass transport from the USSR, which landed March 25, 1942, rather than the August transports. Snow high up on surrounding mountains would not be a surprise in March, but this is the first I heard of snow in Pahlavi itself on the shore of the Caspian Sea in March 1942. Do you (or anyone) have further information on the weather there at that time?
            >
            > In Bo Wolnosc Krzyzami Sie Mierzy (another link from you, thanks Mark) at about 14:19 of Part 1, the narrator says, " ... trochÄ™
            > obcym w tych angielskich hełmach naleśnikach..." which I understand as, "... a little
            > strange in these English pancake helmets ..."
            > My question to you and the group: is "hełmach naleśnikach" a description by the film's writer, or was it a term in common use at the time by the Polish soldiers outfitted in British uniforms?
            >
            > John Halucha
            > Sault Ste Marie, Canada
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Mark and Oyun <mark_oyun@...>
            > To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Friday, November 2, 2012 5:25:00 PM
            > Subject: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] The Lost Requiem
            >
            >
            >  
            > Documentary about Polish refugees in Iran by Khosrow Sinai.
            >
            > Dear Group,
            >
            > We mentioned this film earlier in the year. Well, I stumbled upon it on Youtube while looking for something else; isn't it
            > always the way?! I don't think anyone has posted the link so here goes:
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-C_U2nE3hA0
            >
            > It's in English and worth a look...all 1hr38mins.It's only had 56 views.
            >
            > Regards, Mark Ostrowski
            >



          • Chris W
            Hello John you might find this of interest.  From the book titled PAIFORCE: The official story of the Persia and Iraq Command 1941 - 1946. On page 127 When
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 8, 2012
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              Hello John you might find this of interest. 

              From the book titled PAIFORCE: The official story of the Persia and Iraq Command 1941 - 1946. On page 127 "When Lt.- Col.A. Ross, of the Highland Light Infantry, who was to command the British Base Evacuation Staff, arrived on the 25th [of March] , he found Pahlevi thickly carpeted with snow and the first transport, carrying 1,387 evacuees, already lying off harbour."

              Chris........
              Calgary
              PS:
              You getting some of the white stuff up in the Sue? Got LOTS today in Calgary!

              From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
              To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 12:24:36 PM
              Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Snow and nalesniki [was, The Lost Requiem and Wolnosc Krzyzami...]

               
              Thanks for this, Mark.
              Actually, I believed the man speaking in the video and accepted that snow was possible in Pahlavi in March (though it is super to have it verified) but was wondering if anyone had other reports about the weather in the area at the time.
              John Halucha
              Sault Ste Marie, Canada

            • John Halucha
              Phenomenal info, Chris! Somehow, this snowy detail totally escaped me until I saw the video and you verified with this reference. Maybe it is seems more
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 8, 2012
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                Phenomenal info, Chris! Somehow, this snowy detail totally escaped me until I saw the video and you verified with this reference. Maybe it is seems more significant to me than many others, because of where I live. No, we don't have your snow yet in the Sault, but it is not far off. And yes, we will still have snow on the ground March 25. lol
                I am not familiar with Col. Ross's PAIFORCE book. Are there lots of other references to the Polish evacuees and conditions?
                Thanks very much for looking this up and providing such a thorough reference.
                John Halucha
                Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                From: Chris W <wroblew705@...>
                To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 5:32:34 PM
                Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Snow and nalesniki

                 
                Hello John you might find this of interest. 

                From the book titled PAIFORCE: The official story of the Persia and Iraq Command 1941 - 1946. On page 127 "When Lt.- Col.A. Ross, of the Highland Light Infantry, who was to command the British Base Evacuation Staff, arrived on the 25th [of March] , he found Pahlevi thickly carpeted with snow and the first transport, carrying 1,387 evacuees, already lying off harbour."

                Chris........
                Calgary
                PS:
                You getting some of the white stuff up in the Sue? Got LOTS today in Calgary!


              • Mark
                John. Your posts are always great. I am an amateur Pole and love to learn from the great historians on this site. I don t get the significance of whether
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 8, 2012
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                  John.
                  Your posts are always great.
                  I am an 'amateur Pole' and love to learn from the great historians on this site.
                  I don't get the significance of whether certain guys were POWs or not.
                  War was never declared on Poland by Russia. As I understand, the soviets had been well on their way in murdering the Poles since 1937, and 1939 was just an opportunity to step up their campaign without alot of effort being disguised as potential 'friends'.
                  What am I missing?
                   
                  Mark T.
                  Canada
                  From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                  To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 6:38:45 PM
                  Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Snow and nalesniki
                   
                  Phenomenal info, Chris! Somehow, this snowy detail totally escaped me until I saw the video and you verified with this reference. Maybe it is seems more significant to me than many others, because of where I live. No, we don't have your snow yet in the Sault, but it is not far off. And yes, we will still have snow on the ground March 25. lol
                  I am not familiar with Col. Ross's PAIFORCE book. Are there lots of other references to the Polish evacuees and conditions?
                  Thanks very much for looking this up and providing such a thorough reference.
                  John Halucha
                  Sault Ste Marie, Canada

                  From: Chris W <wroblew705@...>
                  To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 5:32:34 PM
                  Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Snow and nalesniki
                   
                  Hello John you might find this of interest. 

                  From the book titled PAIFORCE: The official story of the Persia and Iraq Command 1941 - 1946. On page 127 "When Lt.- Col.A. Ross, of the Highland Light Infantry, who was to command the British Base Evacuation Staff, arrived on the 25th [of March] , he found Pahlevi thickly carpeted with snow and the first transport, carrying 1,387 evacuees, already lying off harbour."

                  Chris........
                  Calgary
                  PS:
                  You getting some of the white stuff up in the Sue? Got LOTS today in Calgary!

                • Chris W
                  Hey John The book was written in 1948, four pages cover Polish soldiers & civilians evacuated to Pahlevi. There s much description of their misery but no
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 8, 2012
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                    Hey John
                    The book was written in 1948, four pages cover Polish soldiers & civilians evacuated to Pahlevi. There's much description of their misery but no mention of how they got that way only that they had been "temporarily settled in Turkestan after being driven from their homes." With the exception of that one' vague & misleading' historical fact it's an interesting read. The book is very hard to come by and no longer in print. The copy I found is held in the Museum of the Regiments and University of Calgary reference library, it could not be signed out and only read within the facility. I did take photos of the relative pages if you're interested.
                    Chris......
                    Calgary

                    From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                    To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 4:38:45 PM
                    Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Snow and nalesniki

                     
                    Phenomenal info, Chris! Somehow, this snowy detail totally escaped me until I saw the video and you verified with this reference. Maybe it is seems more significant to me than many others, because of where I live. No, we don't have your snow yet in the Sault, but it is not far off. And yes, we will still have snow on the ground March 25. lol
                    I am not familiar with Col. Ross's PAIFORCE book. Are there lots of other references to the Polish evacuees and conditions?
                    Thanks very much for looking this up and providing such a thorough reference.
                    John Halucha
                    Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                    From: Chris W <wroblew705@...>
                    To: "Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com" <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 5:32:34 PM
                    Subject: Re: [www.Kresy-Siberia.org] Re: Snow and nalesniki

                     
                    Hello John you might find this of interest. 

                    From the book titled PAIFORCE: The official story of the Persia and Iraq Command 1941 - 1946. On page 127 "When Lt.- Col.A. Ross, of the Highland Light Infantry, who was to command the British Base Evacuation Staff, arrived on the 25th [of March] , he found Pahlevi thickly carpeted with snow and the first transport, carrying 1,387 evacuees, already lying off harbour."

                    Chris........
                    Calgary
                    PS:
                    You getting some of the white stuff up in the Sue? Got LOTS today in Calgary!

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