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Re: [Kresy-Siberia (est.2001)] Digest Number 5216[5 Attachments]

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  • angela tymrak
    Dear Members, Thank you all for sharing your stories and time. I am grateful to this group and the foundation for your dedication to uncovering the history of
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 12, 2012
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      Dear Members,

      Thank you all for sharing your stories and time. I am grateful to this group and the foundation for your dedication
      to uncovering the history of the Polish people and the personal stories of all those whose lives were
      affected by the war. It is an inspiration to keep me moving forward on my father's story. I recorded my father's story
      (Stanley Tymrakiewicz) over 15 yrs ago and am now working on transcribing it. He just turned 85 and his memory is not
      as sharp ... he can still recall events but not some of the details. I have several questions for the group:

      My father & his family were taken to Archangelskiego Province in the winter of 1940. They worked cutting trees
      in the forest. They were released in Sept. 1941 & made their way South to Tashkent. My father mentions a place called Gozary where they were given uniforms? Does anyone have any more information on this? I assume that all of the
      ships left from Krasnovodsk. My father never mentioned the port that he left from. He said that you had to be
      able to walk to the ship by yourself, basically you had to be 'healthy enough'. He describes practically crawling onto the ship.

      He mentions being given new uniforms, rifles etc at a camp about 200 miles from Bagdad. He mentions the 5th & 7th Divisions. Does anyone have any more information on this? 

      Much later, he describes being on the last ship in a convoy headed to Bari, Italy from Egypt. Later he was assigned to the 64th Battalion Tank Division. Does anyone have any information on this battalion?

      I would be more than happy to interview my father for the foundation. I am not sure who to contact. I also have photos that I would like to share and perhaps some of you will recognize family. I also have photos of my uncle with his battalion (12th Cavalry). He fought at Monte Cassino. I have tried to sign on to the Kresy Foundation so that I can post these but am having trouble logging in. 

      Thank you all for your time. I would be happy to share more of the details of my father's story if anyone needs more information.

      Angela Tymrak 



        

      On Mon, Jun 11, 2012 at 12:52 PM, <Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Messages In This Digest (19 Messages)

      1.
      Visit to Toronto From: elisabeth MARTINEAU
      2a.
      Jozef Czapski recounting Gen Anders From: annapacewicz
      2b.
      Re: Jozef Czapski recounting Gen Anders From: Lenarda Szymczak
      2c.
      Re: Jozef Czapski recounting Gen Anders From: John Halucha
      3.
      off topic - odd topic From: Roger Watkins
      4a.
      Exile and Identity: Polish Women in the Soviet Union During World Wa From: Lenarda Szymczak
      4b.
      Re: Exile and Identity: Polish Women in the Soviet Union During Worl From: annapacewicz
      4c.
      Re: Exile and Identity: Polish Women in the Soviet Union During Worl From: Lenarda Szymczak
      4d.
      Re: Exile and Identity: Polish Women in the Soviet Union During Worl From: Dan Ford
      5a.
      Tymirskij Rejon? From: halinamcd
      5b.
      Re: Tymirskij Rejon? From: Stanislaw Zwierzynski
      5c.
      Re: Tymirskij Rejon? From: george.neisser@...
      6a.
      Krasnovodsk From: Stanislaw Zwierzynski
      6b.
      Re: Krasnovodsk [5 Attachments] From: Dan Ford
      6c.
      Re: Krasnovodsk From: Stanislaw Zwierzynski
      6d.
      Re: Krasnovodsk From: Chris W
      6e.
      Re: Krasnovodsk From: Stanislaw Zwierzynski
      6f.
      Re: Krasnovodsk [5 Attachments] From: ursula lord
      7a.
      Re: Mikhaylo (Michael) Kunitsky or Kornitski From: ANN SIBURUTH

      Messages

      1.

      Visit to Toronto

      Posted by: "elisabeth MARTINEAU" elisabeth.martineau@...   elisabethmartineau

      Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:31 pm (PDT)



      Dear members,

      I was in touch with this group just over a year ago seeking information to
      do research on my father’s family who was deported from the Wilno area to
      Siberia in 1941. I am from Toronto and live in France. I will be spending
      almost six weeks this summer in the Toronto area – from June 18 to July 26.
      I was contacted several months ago by one of your members, a Krystina I
      believe but I can’t find any trace of our correspondence, who wanted to film
      Kresy survivors. If it’s not too late, my father could probably participate,
      depending on his health as he was diagnosed with lung cancer at the
      beginning of the year, but he seems ok for the moment. I will film him
      myself, or at least record his voice. I’ve already interviewed him several
      times over the phone. My father was only a child during deportation.

      I am a journalist myself and I would like to write about the impact of our
      parents or grandparents’ deportation on our own psychology and lives as well
      as the historical facts.

      Do members ever meet together in the Toronto area? I’ll mostly be in
      Mississauga, with my three daughters who are 8, 12 and 14. If anyone in the
      area is interested in meeting me and why not record your point of view,
      maybe we could organize something?

      Please let me know.

      Many thanks

      Elizabeth Martineau (née Witkowska)

      Polish-Canadian living near Lyons, France

      Tél : 04 72 54 31 55

      Port : 06 09 32 03 58

      2a.

      Jozef Czapski recounting Gen Anders

      Posted by: "annapacewicz" annapacewicz@...   annapacewicz

      Sun Jun 10, 2012 10:57 pm (PDT)



      Dear Group,

      I have come across another interesting excerpt from Jozef Czapski's book "The inhuman Land" regarding General Anders securing the evacuation of troops from USSR.

      Whilst a great deal on this topic exists in history/academic books, this is interesting because it is a first person account from the time (Czapski was one of 400 officers who escaped Katyn and was under Gen Anders command):

      Yangi-Yul-II

      "All through that month of March, 1942, our senior officers were fighting tooth and nail merely to keep our army on Soviet soil in being. The Polish High command was suddenly informed by Director-General, Central Asian Military District, that we were to be issued with only 26,000 rations, whereas, no longer ago than December, Stalin had agreed that the total of Polish effectives should be raised to 92,000. Actually, at the beginning of March we had 75,000 men with the colours, and this figure was growing with every day that passed. In spite of the increasingly restrictive and delaying tactics employed by the railways, there was not a day but some new party of "conscripts" reached us. The lighning reduction of our rations by 50% forced the army into a tragic situation.

      Anders at once sent a telegram asking for an interview with Stalin. The reply, dated 9th March, invited him to Moscow, and went on to explain that Polish army rations had had to be reduced because of the non-arrival of promised consignments of American wheat, owing to the outbreak of war with Japan. "In spite of that", went on the message, "we have managed, though with the greatest difficulty, to maintain the standard of living of the Polish army in the USSR at its present level, and this policy will be continued until the 20th March. After that date, it will be necessarty to reduce ration-strength to 30,000.

      A few days later, Anders flew to Moscow, and was received in the Kremlin on the 18th March. Stalin there and then demanded a reduction in our planned effectives from the 7 Divisions (agreed upon in December) to 3 Divisions, plus one Reserve Regiment. All men now enrolled above that total must to back to the kolkhozes or the mines, the forests and the labour-camps. The reason given by Stalin for this decision was the fact that the USA, in consequence of the Japanese war, was not in a position to send the wheat that she had promised.
      Anders realised that this new decree marked the beginning of the liquidation of the Polish army as it had been planned in December, 1941, when General Sikorski had visited Moscow. He knew that by accepting it he would be condemming one half of our troops to an immediate fate which, for many of them, would be worse than death - to a life of slavery and starvation. In the course of a talk lasting for one and a half hours, he got the Dictator to agree that he should be allowed to evacuate such formations as the Russians could not feed to Iran.

      The impression produced on the mass of our troops by this news of a partial evacuation was indescribable. How they got hold of it I cannot say, but before you could say Jack Robinson, every Pole in the USSR, no matter where he might be, seemed to know what was in the wind. Even I, who lived through the crisis, find it impossible to convey the violence of the effect which this information produced.
      The flood of Poles which had been rolling like a torrent from north to south, setting towards us from the remotest kolkhozes and camps, grew even larger. Innumerable civilians, women, old men, children, all of them as emaciated as skeletons, began to swell our Divisions and the other formations stationed in this starving district of Turkestan where, before the war, hundreds of kolkhozes had been employed in growing cotton crops only, and had been dependent for food on grains sent to them from Central Russia. By the time these refugees reached us they were dead beat, and only kept going by the hope that they might, perhaps, be able to get out of Soviet Russia in the wake of the Polish troops.

      In this damp and muddy month of March at Yangi-Yul, neither the hordes of deported persons who were besieging the steps of the HQ building, nor we ourselves who, after all, belonged to the Staff, knew that General Anders, always smiling, always hopeful, moving incessantly from one formation to another, keeping up everybody's spirits and hope in the future, was engaged in a desperate, obstinate and skilful struggle which had as its object the safe-guarding - not now the expansion - of the Polish army in course of being created. We did not know that the raging torrent of new conscripts which so rejoiced our hearts, the growth of our forces and of the auxiliary civil centres, was causing serious concern to the Soviet authorities, and was proceeding directly counter to Stalin's own wishes and instructions".

      Anna Pacewicz
      Sydney

      2b.

      Re: Jozef Czapski recounting Gen Anders

      Posted by: "Lenarda Szymczak" szymczak01@...   lenardaszymczak

      Sun Jun 10, 2012 11:41 pm (PDT)



      Anna, thank you again for this post, it brings so much pride and honour in
      being Polish. These people would rather die as free Polish than go back
      and become a soviet slave. You cannot stop a Pole from being himself,
      Polish blood. We help all, but bow to no one, except God.

      Lenarda

      Australia

      From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of annapacewicz
      Sent: Monday, 11 June, 2012 3:58 PM
      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Kresy-Siberia (est.2001)] Jozef Czapski recounting Gen Anders

      Dear Group,

      I have come across another interesting excerpt from Jozef Czapski's book
      "The inhuman Land" regarding General Anders securing the evacuation of
      troops from USSR.

      Whilst a great deal on this topic exists in history/academic books, this is
      interesting because it is a first person account from the time (Czapski was
      one of 400 officers who escaped Katyn and was under Gen Anders command):

      Yangi-Yul-II

      "All through that month of March, 1942, our senior officers were fighting
      tooth and nail merely to keep our army on Soviet soil in being. The Polish
      High command was suddenly informed by Director-General, Central Asian
      Military District, that we were to be issued with only 26,000 rations,
      whereas, no longer ago than December, Stalin had agreed that the total of
      Polish effectives should be raised to 92,000. Actually, at the beginning of
      March we had 75,000 men with the colours, and this figure was growing with
      every day that passed. In spite of the increasingly restrictive and delaying
      tactics employed by the railways, there was not a day but some new party of
      "conscripts" reached us. The lighning reduction of our rations by 50% forced
      the army into a tragic situation.

      Anders at once sent a telegram asking for an interview with Stalin. The
      reply, dated 9th March, invited him to Moscow, and went on to explain that
      Polish army rations had had to be reduced because of the non-arrival of
      promised consignments of American wheat, owing to the outbreak of war with
      Japan. "In spite of that", went on the message, "we have managed, though
      with the greatest difficulty, to maintain the standard of living of the
      Polish army in the USSR at its present level, and this policy will be
      continued until the 20th March. After that date, it will be necessarty to
      reduce ration-strength to 30,000.

      A few days later, Anders flew to Moscow, and was received in the Kremlin on
      the 18th March. Stalin there and then demanded a reduction in our planned
      effectives from the 7 Divisions (agreed upon in December) to 3 Divisions,
      plus one Reserve Regiment. All men now enrolled above that total must to
      back to the kolkhozes or the mines, the forests and the labour-camps. The
      reason given by Stalin for this decision was the fact that the USA, in
      consequence of the Japanese war, was not in a position to send the wheat
      that she had promised.
      Anders realised that this new decree marked the beginning of the liquidation
      of the Polish army as it had been planned in December, 1941, when General
      Sikorski had visited Moscow. He knew that by accepting it he would be
      condemming one half of our troops to an immediate fate which, for many of
      them, would be worse than death - to a life of slavery and starvation. In
      the course of a talk lasting for one and a half hours, he got the Dictator
      to agree that he should be allowed to evacuate such formations as the
      Russians could not feed to Iran.

      The impression produced on the mass of our troops by this news of a partial
      evacuation was indescribable. How they got hold of it I cannot say, but
      before you could say Jack Robinson, every Pole in the USSR, no matter where
      he might be, seemed to know what was in the wind. Even I, who lived through
      the crisis, find it impossible to convey the violence of the effect which
      this information produced.
      The flood of Poles which had been rolling like a torrent from north to
      south, setting towards us from the remotest kolkhozes and camps, grew even
      larger. Innumerable civilians, women, old men, children, all of them as
      emaciated as skeletons, began to swell our Divisions and the other
      formations stationed in this starving district of Turkestan where, before
      the war, hundreds of kolkhozes had been employed in growing cotton crops
      only, and had been dependent for food on grains sent to them from Central
      Russia. By the time these refugees reached us they were dead beat, and only
      kept going by the hope that they might, perhaps, be able to get out of
      Soviet Russia in the wake of the Polish troops.

      In this damp and muddy month of March at Yangi-Yul, neither the hordes of
      deported persons who were besieging the steps of the HQ building, nor we
      ourselves who, after all, belonged to the Staff, knew that General Anders,
      always smiling, always hopeful, moving incessantly from one formation to
      another, keeping up everybody's spirits and hope in the future, was engaged
      in a desperate, obstinate and skilful struggle which had as its object the
      safe-guarding - not now the expansion - of the Polish army in course of
      being created. We did not know that the raging torrent of new conscripts
      which so rejoiced our hearts, the growth of our forces and of the auxiliary
      civil centres, was causing serious concern to the Soviet authorities, and
      was proceeding directly counter to Stalin's own wishes and instructions".

      Anna Pacewicz
      Sydney

      2c.

      Re: Jozef Czapski recounting Gen Anders

      Posted by: "John Halucha" john.halucha@...   john.halucha

      Mon Jun 11, 2012 4:01 am (PDT)



      Thank you very much for sharing this and the other excerpt a few days ago, Anna. They give some real flavour of the history my father and uncle endured. I hope to read the whole book soon, but these tantalizing bits are much appreciated in the meantime.
      John Halucha
      Sault Ste Marie, Canada

      ________________________________
      From: annapacewicz <annapacewicz@yahoo.com.au>
      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, June 11, 2012 1:57:30 AM
      Subject: [Kresy-Siberia (est.2001)] Jozef Czapski recounting Gen Anders


       
      Dear Group,

      I have come across another interesting excerpt from Jozef Czapski's book "The inhuman Land" regarding General Anders securing the evacuation of troops from USSR.

      Whilst a great deal on this topic exists in history/academic books, this is interesting because it is a first person account from the time (Czapski was one of 400 officers who escaped Katyn and was under Gen Anders command):

      Yangi-Yul-II

      "All through that month of March, 1942, our senior officers were fighting tooth and nail merely to keep our army on Soviet soil in being. The Polish High command was suddenly informed by Director-General, Central Asian Military District, that we were to be issued with only 26,000 rations, whereas, no longer ago than December, Stalin had agreed that the total of Polish effectives should be raised to 92,000. Actually, at the beginning of March we had 75,000 men with the colours, and this figure was growing with every day that passed. In spite of the increasingly restrictive and delaying tactics employed by the railways, there was not a day but some new party of "conscripts" reached us. The lighning reduction of our rations by 50% forced the army into a tragic situation.

      Anders at once sent a telegram asking for an interview with Stalin. The reply, dated 9th March, invited him to Moscow, and went on to explain that Polish army rations had had to be reduced because of the non-arrival of promised consignments of American wheat, owing to the outbreak of war with Japan. "In spite of that", went on the message, "we have managed, though with the greatest difficulty, to maintain the standard of living of the Polish army in the USSR at its present level, and this policy will be continued until the 20th March. After that date, it will be necessarty to reduce ration-strength to 30,000.

      A few days later, Anders flew to Moscow, and was received in the Kremlin on the 18th March. Stalin there and then demanded a reduction in our planned effectives from the 7 Divisions (agreed upon in December) to 3 Divisions, plus one Reserve Regiment. All men now enrolled above that total must to back to the kolkhozes or the mines, the forests and the labour-camps. The reason given by Stalin for this decision was the fact that the USA, in consequence of the Japanese war, was not in a position to send the wheat that she had promised.
      Anders realised that this new decree marked the beginning of the liquidation of the Polish army as it had been planned in December, 1941, when General Sikorski had visited Moscow. He knew that by accepting it he would be condemming one half of our troops to an immediate fate which, for many of them, would be worse than death - to a life of slavery and starvation. In the course of a talk lasting for one and a half hours, he got the Dictator to agree that he should be allowed to evacuate such formations as the Russians could not feed to Iran.

      The impression produced on the mass of our troops by this news of a partial evacuation was indescribable. How they got hold of it I cannot say, but before you could say Jack Robinson, every Pole in the USSR, no matter where he might be, seemed to know what was in the wind. Even I, who lived through the crisis, find it impossible to convey the violence of the effect which this information produced.
      The flood of Poles which had been rolling like a torrent from north to south, setting towards us from the remotest kolkhozes and camps, grew even larger. Innumerable civilians, women, old men, children, all of them as emaciated as skeletons, began to swell our Divisions and the other formations stationed in this starving district of Turkestan where, before the war, hundreds of kolkhozes had been employed in growing cotton crops only, and had been dependent for food on grains sent to them from Central Russia. By the time these refugees reached us they were dead beat, and only kept going by the hope that they might, perhaps, be able to get out of Soviet Russia in the wake of the Polish troops.

      In this damp and muddy month of March at Yangi-Yul, neither the hordes of deported persons who were besieging the steps of the HQ building, nor we ourselves who, after all, belonged to the Staff, knew that General Anders, always smiling, always hopeful, moving incessantly from one formation to another, keeping up everybody's spirits and hope in the future, was engaged in a desperate, obstinate and skilful struggle which had as its object the safe-guarding - not now the expansion - of the Polish army in course of being created. We did not know that the raging torrent of new conscripts which so rejoiced our hearts, the growth of our forces and of the auxiliary civil centres, was causing serious concern to the Soviet authorities, and was proceeding directly counter to Stalin's own wishes and instructions".

      Anna Pacewicz
      Sydney
      3.

      off topic - odd topic

      Posted by: "Roger Watkins" rogerwatkins@...   watkinsroger10

      Sun Jun 10, 2012 11:33 pm (PDT)



      Hello group

      I heard a curious story from my mother this weekend while trying to help her unravel her family journey through Siberia and across to Omsk Olast, where they were sent after the amnesty, and beyond to eventually arrive at Kraznavodsk.

      My mother was born in Tajkury, a very small vllage which no-one seems to have heard of, near Rowne. We were looking at the list of the osadniks at Tajkury, and there is a fellow listed called Piotr Djakow. She recalls hearing a story when she was a child that he seems to have been a deserter from the Red Army in the war of 1919/21 - he joined Pilsudski's Legions and fought againt the Soviets, and was awarded land at Tajkury.

      All the osadniks from Tajkury were sent to Wologoda on 10 February 1940.

      What she remembered out of the blue is that when the Poles from Wologoda arrived in Omsk, Piotr Djakow's daughter, who was beautiful but whose name she cannot remember, was taken by the Russians and apparently became a Russian film star.

      Does anyone recall hearing about such things happening?

      Roger Watkins
      Sobierajski family
      Tajkury/Rowne
      Wellington, NZ
      4a.

      Exile and Identity: Polish Women in the Soviet Union During World Wa

      Posted by: "Lenarda Szymczak" szymczak01@...   lenardaszymczak

      Mon Jun 11, 2012 12:34 am (PDT)





      Most amazing book. There is introduction and some of it can be read
      online. This is a must read. I cannot copy section to give you idea, but it
      writes of all the values, we as a group stand for.

      Very important, when you enter the link, find picture of book and click on
      the actual picture, this will take you to the front cover and beginning of
      preview read.

      Lenarda

      Australia

      Front Coverhttp://books.google.com.au/books?id=Qu1XgBRrHMwC
      <http://books.google.com.au/books?id=Qu1XgBRrHMwC&pg=PA326&lpg=PA326&dq=Djak
      ow+wwii&source=bl&ots=M6uYeSxM_t&sig=unUkmBkWRo3rq7wOBKJK1iwreM0&hl=en&sa=X&
      ei=bpTVT-aSINGTiQfa--mjAw&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false>
      &pg=PA326&lpg=PA326&dq=Djakow+wwii&source=bl&ots=M6uYeSxM_t&sig=unUkmBkWRo3r
      q7wOBKJK1iwreM0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=bpTVT-aSINGTiQfa--mjAw&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ6AEwAQ#v
      =onepage&q&f=false

      4b.

      Re: Exile and Identity: Polish Women in the Soviet Union During Worl

      Posted by: "annapacewicz" annapacewicz@...   annapacewicz

      Mon Jun 11, 2012 1:42 am (PDT)



      Hi Lenarda, yes this is a must-read. Thank you for bringing it to the attention of the group.

      The author Katherine R Jolluck is an academic (and as such it's very much an analytical, academic read). The book is really a thesis, based on the first hand accounts of Polish women from the Eastern provinces of Poland deported to the USSR from the Hoover archives in California. From memory she analysed in close detail about 1,000 testimonies from Hoover.

      It deals with many difficult and sensitive issues (such as sexual harrasement, rape, torture etc) and contains many of the most harrowing accounts that I've read.

      Topics covered include the question of Polish family and nationality; labour in exile; the body and sexuality; demographics and national minorities; the definition of Polish women compared to Asiatic and Russian women.

      There is also a very clear analysis of the quantitative estimates of the 4 deportations (for those in the group interested in hard numbers).

      Kind regards,

      Anna Pacewicz
      Sydney Australia

      --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "Lenarda Szymczak" <szymczak01@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Most amazing book. There is introduction and some of it can be read
      > online. This is a must read. I cannot copy section to give you idea, but it
      > writes of all the values, we as a group stand for.
      >
      > Very important, when you enter the link, find picture of book and click on
      > the actual picture, this will take you to the front cover and beginning of
      > preview read.
      >
      >
      >
      > Lenarda
      >
      > Australia
      >
      > Front Coverhttp://books.google.com.au/books?id=Qu1XgBRrHMwC
      > <http://books.google.com.au/books?id=Qu1XgBRrHMwC&pg=PA326&lpg=PA326&dq=Djak
      > ow+wwii&source=bl&ots=M6uYeSxM_t&sig=unUkmBkWRo3rq7wOBKJK1iwreM0&hl=en&sa=X&
      > ei=bpTVT-aSINGTiQfa--mjAw&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false>
      > &pg=PA326&lpg=PA326&dq=Djakow+wwii&source=bl&ots=M6uYeSxM_t&sig=unUkmBkWRo3r
      > q7wOBKJK1iwreM0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=bpTVT-aSINGTiQfa--mjAw&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ6AEwAQ#v
      > =onepage&q&f=false
      >

      4c.

      Re: Exile and Identity: Polish Women in the Soviet Union During Worl

      Posted by: "Lenarda Szymczak" szymczak01@...   lenardaszymczak

      Mon Jun 11, 2012 2:29 am (PDT)



      Thank you Anna, for giving more detail.

      Regards

      Lenarda, Australia

      From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of annapacewicz
      Sent: Monday, 11 June, 2012 6:43 PM
      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Kresy-Siberia (est.2001)] Re: Exile and Identity: Polish Women in
      the Soviet Union During World War II - Katherine R. Jolluck - Google Books

      Hi Lenarda, yes this is a must-read. Thank you for bringing it to the
      attention of the group.

      The author Katherine R Jolluck is an academic (and as such it's very much an
      analytical, academic read). The book is really a thesis, based on the first
      hand accounts of Polish women from the Eastern provinces of Poland deported
      to the USSR from the Hoover archives in California. From memory she analysed
      in close detail about 1,000 testimonies from Hoover.

      It deals with many difficult and sensitive issues (such as sexual
      harrasement, rape, torture etc) and contains many of the most harrowing
      accounts that I've read.

      Topics covered include the question of Polish family and nationality; labour
      in exile; the body and sexuality; demographics and national minorities; the
      definition of Polish women compared to Asiatic and Russian women.

      There is also a very clear analysis of the quantitative estimates of the 4
      deportations (for those in the group interested in hard numbers).

      Kind regards,

      Anna Pacewicz
      Sydney Australia

      --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      <mailto:Kresy-Siberia%40yahoogroups.com> , "Lenarda Szymczak"
      <szymczak01@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Most amazing book. There is introduction and some of it can be read
      > online. This is a must read. I cannot copy section to give you idea, but
      it
      > writes of all the values, we as a group stand for.
      >
      > Very important, when you enter the link, find picture of book and click on
      > the actual picture, this will take you to the front cover and beginning of
      > preview read.
      >
      >
      >
      > Lenarda
      >
      > Australia
      >
      > Front Coverhttp://books.google.com.au/books?id=Qu1XgBRrHMwC
      > <http://books.google.com.au/books?id=Qu1XgBRrHMwC
      <http://books.google.com.au/books?id=Qu1XgBRrHMwC&pg=PA326&lpg=PA326&dq=Djak
      > &pg=PA326&lpg=PA326&dq=Djak
      >
      ow+wwii&source=bl&ots=M6uYeSxM_t&sig=unUkmBkWRo3rq7wOBKJK1iwreM0&hl=en&sa=X&
      > ei=bpTVT-aSINGTiQfa--mjAw&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false>
      >
      &pg=PA326&lpg=PA326&dq=Djakow+wwii&source=bl&ots=M6uYeSxM_t&sig=unUkmBkWRo3r
      >
      q7wOBKJK1iwreM0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=bpTVT-aSINGTiQfa--mjAw&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ6AEwAQ#v
      > =onepage&q&f=false
      >

      4d.

      Re: Exile and Identity: Polish Women in the Soviet Union During Worl

      Posted by: "Dan Ford" cub06h@...   godanford

      Mon Jun 11, 2012 5:35 am (PDT)



      Thanks for the pointer. I see that it is in the local university
      library, and I will check it out. -- Dan Ford, New Hampshire USA

      On 6/11/2012 3:33 AM, Lenarda Szymczak wrote:
      >
      > Most amazing book. There is introduction and some of it can be read
      > online. This is a must read. I cannot copy section to give you idea,
      > but it writes of all the values, we as a group stand for.
      >
      >
      >

      5a.

      Tymirskij Rejon?

      Posted by: "halinamcd" redcube@...   halinamcd

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