Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: holocaust victims

Expand Messages
  • eve5j
    Danuta, Yes, that is exactly what I am stating. In the most recent settlements from countries or corporations, ethnic Poles were totally excluded from
    Message 1 of 34 , Feb 1, 2012
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Danuta,

      Yes, that is exactly what I am stating. In the most recent settlements from countries or corporations, ethnic Poles were totally excluded from receiving individual compensation even though as a group Poles were one of the largest numerically. You can do the research, but it will be a waste of time, for I am correct. The cases were widely advertised all over the world, yet the larger victim groups, of which Poles were primary, were excluded.

      Those Poles in the West who received compensation after the war is something else. Also the number of victims and other figures for subsequent settlements were based on earlier ones, I presume those compiled after the war. It seems to me the primary reason for ethnic Poles exclusion specifically was their high numbers. Subtracting the larger in number Poles from the total number of victims and including only those smaller groups (Jehovah's Witnesses, Roma, homosexuals, and the disabled) meant there was more money for those included and named victims groupings. In actuality, even the named groups received a pittance. The lawyers who were supposedly representing all victims made millions, which is another travesty.

      However, Poles must always be included in any list of victims! With each publication of official lists, we are being further erased from history.

      The quote below is from the link I posted yesterday:

      "Unlike those Jews who survived the Holocaust and moved to the West, Poles remained captives of the Soviets for 45 years. Unlike the Jews, Poles were never individually compensated by Germans for forced labor and camp atrocities."

      http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia/498/thompson.html

      Ewa


      --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, Danuta Janina Wójcik <sandlily@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Ewa, are you stating that no Polish person in America, received any compensation for slave labour or forced labour??? I know at least one person, that did not, my aunt, she was young and silly, as she entered the Ellis Island Port, she dumped all her valuable documents and Arbeitsbuch fur Auslander work book, into the ocean.
      >
      > Here in Canada, it was advertised in every Polish newspaper, in my parent's community many did not want anything back from Germany, But once, one person applied it was a domino effect, they encouraged each other. My parents received as I recall a lump sum several years later, but received a monthly cheque. If one spouse died, the other received a small widow/widowers allowance and if you had a child/children born in Germany during the war, the mother received the extra allowance. I know this for a fact, because every year they had to complete a Declaration for further receipt of payments from the Federal Republic of Germany, my parents had to verify that they were still living, and I was the one who filled out the paper work and had it signed by a notary.
    • Dan Ford
      His father was imprisoned, I think in the 1950s, and sent to a Soviet uranium mine. He was released after some years but died while fairly young. At dinner one
      Message 34 of 34 , Feb 4, 2012
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        His father was imprisoned, I think in the 1950s, and sent to a Soviet
        uranium mine. He was released after some years but died while fairly
        young. At dinner one night he (my neighbor) got talking because he was
        in my company and had been asking about such things, and also because
        his cousin and family were visiting from Germany, and they both shared
        the experience of escaping from Poland. And perhaps there was a glass of
        wine involved. Anyhow, he told his father's story about dinner in the
        camp, and how one particular sadistic trusty (I don't know the Polish or
        Russian or even British name for a prisoner who collaborates with the
        guards for better treatment) died as the result of an accident, probably
        no accident at all, and that night a human skull turned up in the soup vat.

        At this exact moment, his pretty wife (a classmate of my daughter's at
        Harvard, as it happens) came out from the kitchen to ask whether we
        wanted ice cream on our cake for dessert. Even as she spoke, she was
        processing this story which she had heard while entering the room, and
        the expression on her face was something to behold. In her right hand
        she held a plate of chocolate cake by itself, and in her left the same
        cake a la mode.

        They have certainly livened up the neighborhood, though they haven't
        been up much this winter. The previous owners never spoke to us. I once
        saw them walking along the road with a baby carriage, and thought, Oh! a
        grandchild, how nice! but on getting closer realized that it was a dog
        in the carriage (pram).

        Blue skies! -- Dan Ford USA

        On 2/4/2012 12:58 PM, Cynthia Pukiello wrote:
        >
        > Hello Dan,
        > Could not help but say a few words re;your neighbour & just how
        > affluent these people are after all they have gone through & good luck
        > to him ,you are e
        > very fortunate to have such a neighbour.
        > I am the widow of a polish man who was arrested aged 16 years & sent
        > as a deportee to Siberia.
        > Good wishes are sent to you & yours.
        > Cynthia Pukiello (English UK).
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.