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RE: [Kresy-Siberia] gulag/forced labour camp

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  • Elizabeth Olsson
    I’ve never heard of any “thugs and hardened criminals” in the posiolki. They were family camps. I think that conditions in the posiolki varied a lot,
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1 3:19 PM
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      I’ve never heard of any “thugs and hardened criminals” in the posiolki. They were family camps.

      I think that conditions in the posiolki varied a lot, depending on the camp commandant’s attititude. It sounds like the commandant at my mum’s camp, Monastyriok, just south of Kotlas, treated them as well as was possible, was sympathetic to their needs and gave them good advice when the “Amnesty” was announced.

       

      pozdrowienia
      Elzunia Gradosielska Olsson
      Alingsås, Sweden
      Names: Maczka. Gradosielski.
      Kresy: Osada Krechowiecka. Wilno.
      Siberia: Monastyriok. Siewzeldorlag, Komi.
      Army: Pestki 316 Transport.
      Sappers 5KDP.

       


      From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Barbara Scrivens
      Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2011 11:05 PM
      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] gulag/forced labour camp

       

       

      Hi Elzunia,

      I cannot see the difference between loss of liberty and its restriction in this case. It seems sheer semantics. Loss may be interpreted as being unable to move outside the immediate grounds of the camp and restriction as being able to walk 14km to bring back a potato for the family. In both worlds, liberty was lost. Both precluded leaving.

      I find the use of the words ‘sentenced’ and ‘arranged’ also interesting. As if there was a proper court system:

      According to the official terminology, these were not labour camps, but special settlements. The difference is based on the fact that "corrective labour camps" [also called GULAGs] were reserved for people sentenced to loss of liberty, while "specialposiolki" [special settlements] were for deportees, people without a court hearing, for whom was arranged a different kind of repression - namely restriction of liberty.

      The only difference I can find so far is that the forced labour camps (special settlements for the special people Stalin referred to as ‘filth’) had fewer thugs and hardened criminals, their womenfolk were protected by their families, and completely innocent children were interned.

      Otherwise, both inmates had people in there on the most spurious of charges.

      Thanks for trying to help. Apologies for my frustration.

      Barbara

       

       

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