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Re: Bialosiewicz Family

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  • janusz_ks
    ... In a Polish source I found a mention of Lagiernyj Punkt No 55, V Oddielenie NKWD. Obóz Nianda (Niadnoma?) , ustwymski rejon, Komi ASSR , on the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 1, 2010
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      --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "henrypavlovich" <henrypavlovich@...> wrote:
      > a special settlement in Nyando Rayon in the Arkhangelsk area
      In a Polish source I found a mention of "Lagiernyj Punkt No 55, V Oddielenie NKWD. Obóz Nianda (Niadnoma?) , ustwymski rejon, Komi ASSR", on the Kotlas-Workuta railway line (near Urdoma station).

      Could it be the place?
    • simonlast35
      Hi Henry Thanks for your message and the information contained therein, which is fascinating. My Great Grandmother Zofia would have been listed as a
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 1, 2010
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        Hi Henry

        Thanks for your message and the information contained therein, which is fascinating.

        My Great Grandmother Zofia would have been listed as a Bialosiewicz her married name and not Lukasiewicz as I stated earlier.

        Is Ulanowka Wolyn still part of Poland or is it now in the Ukraine?

        Also if I wanted to obtain copy birth and marriage certificates where would I obtain these from. Also as my Great Grandmother Zofia died en route to Siberia on the train would there be any records for this?

        I also knew Zbignew as Zybslaw.

        You mention the fathers for both Stefan and Zofia and these are names that I have never known - where could I get more information about these?

        I will definately order a copy of your book as it sounds really interesting.

        I look forward to hearing from you

        Kind regards

        Simon

        --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "henrypavlovich" <henrypavlovich@...> wrote:
        >
        > Simon, Just in case you are not aware - there are a few mistakes or typos in your message which can affect the success of your research. There are excellent resources here on the Kresy site which you can look up yourself, but I thought I would let you know what I found out about your relatives on a Russian-language site which uses, among others, a database of Poles forcibly sent to special camps in the Archangel (Arkhangelsk) area:
        > Tadeusz (son of Stefan) and formerly resident of Ulanowka in Wolyn, born 1928, is mentioned. Like all the family he is recorded as being sentenced to deportation to a special settlement in Nyando Rayon in the Arkhangelsk area on 1st March 1940 and then released "under amnesty" on 1st September 1941. Also mentioned is his father Stefan (son of Leon) born 1903 in Mieszczanska, Lublin (same fate), resident of Ulanowka, Wolyn. Ditto Zdislaw (son of Stefan) - (the name given here is not Zbigniew which you cite in your message) - born 1923 in Ulanowka (same fate as others). Ditto Stefania (daughter of Stefan) born 1925 in Ulanowka (same fate as the others).
        > The only Zofia Lukasiewicz I could find was the daughter of Jozef, born in 1900 in Dubrowica, Rowne, but this person was released under the amnesty in 1941 so is probably not the same person as the one you mention.
        > The place in Italy where lots of Poles fought against the Nazis under General Anders in the Second Corps is Monte Cassino.
        > If you are interested in a narrative account of what happened to many of the inhabitants of the Kresy (including Wolyn), then take a look at my book (below my sign-off) available in libraries and bookshops. Many people have visited the former Kresy military colonies: there are local interpreters. Most of the inter-war buildings were cleared away by the post-war Ukrainian authorities. During a visit my uncle met an old lady there who remembered him as a toddler (or at least his surname).
        > Best of luck with your research.
        > Henry Pavlovich
        > _____________________________________________
        > My book, Worlds Apart: Surviving Identity and Memory, is available from online retailers, e.g. Amazon. There is more about the book and the context behind it at www.henrypavlovich.com (ISBN 978-1-84728-226-2)
        > Some photos are on www.pbase.com/pavlovich
        >
        >
        > --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "simonlast35" <simonian@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi
        > >
        > > My Grandfather Tadeusz Bialosiewicz born in 1928 is Polish and settled in the UK after World War 2.
        > >
        > > I am hoping to go to Poland in May 2010 to trace more about his family's history and to do this need to undertake further research first.
        > >
        > > His father was a Stefan Bialosiewicz born in 1903 and the family originated from Wolyn in Poland, which I believe is now part of the Ukraine.Stefan had three sisters Helena,Maria and Leokadira
        > >
        > > The family were sent to Siberia by the Russians and I know that my great grandmother Zofia Lukasiewicz died on the train journey and that her body was thrown from the train.
        > >
        > > My grandfather had two siblings Zbignew (Zybslaw) and Stephania.
        > >
        > > Stefan survived and fought with the Polish Army at the Battle of Monte Cassion in Italy and after the war ended up in America with his second wife.
        > >
        > > Zbignew ended up in Canada and Stephania in America.
        > >
        > > I have attached a newspaper articleabout my Great Grandfather Stefan story which is where I have gained my information from to date.
        > >
        > > Any help with my reseach will be greatly appreciated
        > >
        > > Kind regards
        > >
        > > Simon
        > >
        >
      • simonlast35
        Hi Janusz Thanks for your message - as I am new to this site please can you explain Lagiernyj Punkt No 55, V Oddielenie NKWD. Obóz Nianda (Niadnoma?) ,
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 1, 2010
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          Hi Janusz

          Thanks for your message - as I am new to this site please can you explain

          "Lagiernyj Punkt No 55, V Oddielenie NKWD. Obóz Nianda (Niadnoma?) , ustwymski rejon, Komi ASSR",

          in more detail for me.

          Kind regards

          Simon

          --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "janusz_ks" <janusz.lukasiak@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "henrypavlovich" <henrypavlovich@> wrote:
          > > a special settlement in Nyando Rayon in the Arkhangelsk area
          > In a Polish source I found a mention of "Lagiernyj Punkt No 55, V Oddielenie NKWD. Obóz Nianda (Niadnoma?) , ustwymski rejon, Komi ASSR", on the Kotlas-Workuta railway line (near Urdoma station).
          >
          > Could it be the place?
          >
        • janusz_ks
          ... Lagiernyj Punkt is something like (labour) camp number 55 V Oddielenie NKWD 5th Division/Department/Section of NKVD Obóz is camp rejon is the
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 1, 2010
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            --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "simonlast35" <simonian@...> wrote:
            >can you explain
            >
            > "Lagiernyj Punkt No 55, V Oddielenie NKWD. Obóz Nianda (Niadnoma?) , ustwymski rejon, Komi ASSR",

            'Lagiernyj Punkt' is something like (labour) camp number 55
            'V Oddielenie NKWD' 5th Division/Department/Section of NKVD
            'Obóz' is camp
            'rejon' is the Polish spelling of raion, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raion
            for ASSR see
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomous_republics_of_the_Soviet_Union
          • Stefan Wisniowski (KS)
            I should add that the Soviet records as far as names and dates and occupations were not always correct - either the neighbours drawing up the lists got them
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 1, 2010
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              I should add that the Soviet records as far as names and dates and
              occupations were not always correct - either the neighbours drawing up the
              lists got them wrong, or the Soviet apparatchiks writing the lists made
              mistakes, or the language change into Russian was problematic, or the Polish
              prisoners themselves lied to try to trick the Soviets.



              In the records I obtained from MEMORIAL SOCIETY in Moscow, taken from the
              Archangel Ministry of the Interior Archives, my grandfather, an civilian
              osadnik (settler) and circuit magistrate in Lwow/Brody, is described as a
              carpenter. His name "Lucjan" is listed as "Luka" and my grandmother
              "Apolonia" is listed as "Pelagia". Their last name "Wisniowski" is listed as
              "Wisniewski".



              Listing a "Zbigniew" as a "Zdsislaw" sounds like it could be a similar
              situation.



              Regards



              --
              STEFAN WI�NIOWSKI
              Foundation President

              Kresy-Siberia Foundation
              "Established to inspire, promote and support research, remembrance and
              recognition of Polish citizens' struggles in the Eastern Borderlands and in
              Exile during World War 2." Registered in Poland (KRS 0000326445), UK
              (Company No. 6946138), Australia (ABN 63136599776) & other countries
              pending.

              <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/> www.Kresy-Siberia.org



              ul. Krakowskie Przedmie�cie 64 lok. 31

              00-322 Warszawa, Polska

              tel/fax +48 22 556 90 55



              Personal:
              3 Castle Circuit Close
              Seaforth NSW 2092 Australia
              Tel +61 411 864 873
              Stefan.Wisniowski@...



              From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of henrypavlovich
              Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2010 12:51 AM
              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Bialosiewicz Family





              Simon, Just in case you are not aware - there are a few mistakes or typos in
              your message which can affect the success of your research. There are
              excellent resources here on the Kresy site which you can look up yourself,
              but I thought I would let you know what I found out about your relatives on
              a Russian-language site which uses, among others, a database of Poles
              forcibly sent to special camps in the Archangel (Arkhangelsk) area:
              Tadeusz (son of Stefan) and formerly resident of Ulanowka in Wolyn, born
              1928, is mentioned. Like all the family he is recorded as being sentenced to
              deportation to a special settlement in Nyando Rayon in the Arkhangelsk area
              on 1st March 1940 and then released "under amnesty" on 1st September 1941.
              Also mentioned is his father Stefan (son of Leon) born 1903 in Mieszczanska,
              Lublin (same fate), resident of Ulanowka, Wolyn. Ditto Zdislaw (son of
              Stefan) - (the name given here is not Zbigniew which you cite in your
              message) - born 1923 in Ulanowka (same fate as others). Ditto Stefania
              (daughter of Stefan) born 1925 in Ulanowka (same fate as the others).
              The only Zofia Lukasiewicz I could find was the daughter of Jozef, born in
              1900 in Dubrowica, Rowne, but this person was released under the amnesty in
              1941 so is probably not the same person as the one you mention.
              The place in Italy where lots of Poles fought against the Nazis under
              General Anders in the Second Corps is Monte Cassino.
              If you are interested in a narrative account of what happened to many of the
              inhabitants of the Kresy (including Wolyn), then take a look at my book
              (below my sign-off) available in libraries and bookshops. Many people have
              visited the former Kresy military colonies: there are local interpreters.
              Most of the inter-war buildings were cleared away by the post-war Ukrainian
              authorities. During a visit my uncle met an old lady there who remembered
              him as a toddler (or at least his surname).
              Best of luck with your research.
              Henry Pavlovich
              _____________________________________________
              My book, Worlds Apart: Surviving Identity and Memory, is available from
              online retailers, e.g. Amazon. There is more about the book and the context
              behind it at www.henrypavlovich.com (ISBN 978-1-84728-226-2)
              Some photos are on www.pbase.com/pavlovich

              --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:Kresy-Siberia%40yahoogroups.com> , "simonlast35" <simonian@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hi
              >
              > My Grandfather Tadeusz Bialosiewicz born in 1928 is Polish and settled in
              the UK after World War 2.
              >
              > I am hoping to go to Poland in May 2010 to trace more about his family's
              history and to do this need to undertake further research first.
              >
              > His father was a Stefan Bialosiewicz born in 1903 and the family
              originated from Wolyn in Poland, which I believe is now part of the
              Ukraine.Stefan had three sisters Helena,Maria and Leokadira
              >
              > The family were sent to Siberia by the Russians and I know that my great
              grandmother Zofia Lukasiewicz died on the train journey and that her body
              was thrown from the train.
              >
              > My grandfather had two siblings Zbignew (Zybslaw) and Stephania.
              >
              > Stefan survived and fought with the Polish Army at the Battle of Monte
              Cassion in Italy and after the war ended up in America with his second wife.
              >
              > Zbignew ended up in Canada and Stephania in America.
              >
              > I have attached a newspaper articleabout my Great Grandfather Stefan story
              which is where I have gained my information from to date.
              >
              > Any help with my reseach will be greatly appreciated
              >
              > Kind regards
              >
              > Simon
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • janusz_ks
              ... I m sure your granddad preferred not to be known by the Soviets as osadnik and a Polish civil servant to boot :-) ... The Russian version of Lucjan is
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 2, 2010
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                --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "Stefan Wisniowski \(KS\)" <stefan.wisniowski@...> wrote:
                > In the records I obtained from MEMORIAL SOCIETY in Moscow, taken from the
                > Archangel Ministry of the Interior Archives, my grandfather, an civilian
                > osadnik (settler) and circuit magistrate in Lwow/Brody, is described as a
                > carpenter.
                I'm sure your granddad preferred not to be known by the Soviets as osadnik and a Polish civil servant to boot :-)

                > His name "Lucjan" is listed as "Luka"
                The Russian version of Lucjan is Lukyan

                > Their last name "Wisniowski" is listed as
                > "Wisniewski".
                Two possible explanations:
                (a) a simple mistake, as Wisniewski is much more common than Wisniowski
                (b) a tricky problem of transliterating Polish 'io' and 'ie' into Russian and back. Boring details will follow off-list, but only if specifically requested :-)

                Janusz
              • henrypavlovich
                Another reason for errors in the Soviet records (my mother once told me) is that the victims themselves often had to write down their names in Cyrillic and in
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 2, 2010
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                  Another reason for errors in the Soviet records (my mother once told me) is that the victims themselves often had to write down their names in Cyrillic and in some cases made elementary mistakes in transliteration because certain letters that look the same sound different, e.g. the letter Y is an OO in Russian. In the case of one of the Bialosiewicz victims, the Polish name Zdislaw has been transliterated as Zbislav, presumably because the hand-written Russian for the letter B looks like a D. If you know both Polish and Russian, then it is easy to spot these examples (like the ones mentioned by Janusz).
                  Henry Pavlovich
                  _____________________________________________
                  My book, Worlds Apart: Surviving Identity and Memory, is available from online retailers, e.g. Amazon. There is more about the book and the context behind it at www.henrypavlovich.com (ISBN 978-1-84728-226-2)
                  Some photos are on www.pbase.com/pavlovich




                  --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "janusz_ks" <janusz.lukasiak@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "Stefan Wisniowski \(KS\)" <stefan.wisniowski@> wrote:
                  > > In the records I obtained from MEMORIAL SOCIETY in Moscow, taken from the
                  > > Archangel Ministry of the Interior Archives, my grandfather, an civilian
                  > > osadnik (settler) and circuit magistrate in Lwow/Brody, is described as a
                  > > carpenter.
                  > I'm sure your granddad preferred not to be known by the Soviets as osadnik and a Polish civil servant to boot :-)
                  >
                  > > His name "Lucjan" is listed as "Luka"
                  > The Russian version of Lucjan is Lukyan
                  >
                  > > Their last name "Wisniowski" is listed as
                  > > "Wisniewski".
                  > Two possible explanations:
                  > (a) a simple mistake, as Wisniewski is much more common than Wisniowski
                  > (b) a tricky problem of transliterating Polish 'io' and 'ie' into Russian and back. Boring details will follow off-list, but only if specifically requested :-)
                  >
                  > Janusz
                  >
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