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Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

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  • Lucyna Artymiuk
    http://www.kpcnews.com/index.php?option=com_content
    Message 1 of 27 , Oct 25, 2009
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      http://www.kpcnews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book-tells-Auburn-man’s-gulag-survival-story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151

       

       

      Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

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      Staff Reports

      Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

       

      AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
      “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
      Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
      Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
      At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
      On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
      Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
      Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
      Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
      This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

       

    • Ed Bachorz
      This can t be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army? Impossible... ... From: Lucyna Artymiuk Subject: [Kresy-Siberia]
      Message 2 of 27 , Oct 25, 2009
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        This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
        Impossible...

        --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...> wrote:

        From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...>
        Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
        To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, 300PolishSquadron@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

         

        http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn- man’s-gulag-survival- story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151

         

         

        Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

        PDF

        Print

        E-mail

         

        Staff Reports

        Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

         

        AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
        “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
        Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
        Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
        At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
        On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
        Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
        Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
        Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
        This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

         


      • Frank Pleszak
        The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one. Frank _____ From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 27 , Oct 25, 2009
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          The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

           

          Frank

           


          From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
          Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

           

          This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
          Impossible...

          --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...> wrote:


          From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...>
          Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, 300PolishSquadron@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

           

          http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn- man’s-gulag-survival- story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151

           

           

          Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

          PDF

          Print

          E-mail

           

          Staff Reports

          Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

           

          AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
          “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
          Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
          Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
          At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
          On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
          Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
          Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
          Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
          This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

           



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        • Stefan Wisniowski (KS)
          Dear Ed Of course you are right, over 115,000 made it out with Anders, and others with Berling and so on. I think the book means only 583 POWs joined Anders
          Message 4 of 27 , Oct 25, 2009
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            Dear Ed

             

            Of course you are right, over 115,000 made it out with Anders, and others with Berling and so on.  I think the book means only 583 POWs joined Anders coming from this one GULAG, but the quote is misleading to say the least.


            Stefan Wisniowski

            Sydney

             

             

            From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
            Sent: Monday, October 26, 2009 1:36 AM
            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

             

            This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
            Impossible...

            --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...> wrote:


            From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...>
            Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, 300PolishSquadron@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

             

            http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn- man’s-gulag-survival- story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151

             

             

            Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

            PDF

            Print

            E-mail

             

            Staff Reports

            Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

             

            AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
            “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
            Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
            Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
            At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
            On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
            Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
            Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
            Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
            This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

             

             

          • Chris Gniewosz
            You mention Kowalski. Are you familiar with Niula Wierusz-Kowlski mentioned numerous times in Noble Youth ? Chris Gniewosz Portland Oregon -- Published by
            Message 5 of 27 , Oct 25, 2009
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              You mention Kowalski. Are you familiar with Niula Wierusz-Kowlski mentioned numerous times in "Noble Youth"?
              Chris Gniewosz
              Portland Oregon

              --
              Published by Chris Gniewosz
              "Noble Youth - Adventures of Fourteen Siblings Growing Up on a Polish Estate"
              "Noble Flight - A Family's Exodus and Survival During World War II" www.NobleYouth.com



              On Sun, Oct 25, 2009 at 8:06 AM, Stefan Wisniowski (KS) <stefan.wisniowski@...> wrote:
               

              Dear Ed

               

              Of course you are right, over 115,000 made it out with Anders, and others with Berling and so on.  I think the book means only 583 POWs joined Anders coming from this one GULAG, but the quote is misleading to say the least.


              Stefan Wisniowski

              Sydney

               

               

              From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
              Sent: Monday, October 26, 2009 1:36 AM

              Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

               

              This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
              Impossible...

              --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...> wrote:


              From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...>
              Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, 300PolishSquadron@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

               

              http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn- man’s-gulag-survival- story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151

               

               

              Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

              PDF

              Print

              E-mail

               

              Staff Reports

              Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

               

              AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
              “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
              Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
              Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
              At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
              On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
              Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
              Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
              Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
              This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

               

               




              --
              Published by Chris Gniewosz
              "Noble Youth - Adventures of Fourteen Siblings Growing Up on a Polish Estate"
              "Noble Flight - A Family's Exodus and Survival During World War II" www.NobleYouth.com

              Chrisco Construction LLC
              Oregon CCB #187782
              Chris Gniewosz, General Contractor
              Available for home and commercial remodel or new construction
            • Ed Bachorz
              Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic... Ed ... From: Frank Pleszak
              Message 6 of 27 , Oct 25, 2009
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                Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic...
                Ed

                --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                 

                The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                 

                Frank

                 


                From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                 

                This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                Impossible.. .

                --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                 

                http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn- man’s-gulag-survival- story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151

                 

                 

                Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                PDF

                Print

                E-mail

                 

                Staff Reports

                Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                 

                AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                 



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              • ed Bator
                I was 9-yrs old in Kazakhstan when Stalin released Polish POW to form Polish Army under Gen. Anders.  My Father was notified by NKVD to report to Buzuluk to
                Message 7 of 27 , Oct 25, 2009
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                  I was 9-yrs old in Kazakhstan when Stalin released Polish POW to form Polish Army
                  under Gen. Anders.  My Father was notified by NKVD to report to Buzuluk to the Polish
                  HQ. Our father notified us of formation of Szkoly Junackie in Wrewsk (Wrewskoje).
                  I and my older brothers joined, and my sister was admited into an orphanage. In March
                  in 1942 we were transported by train to Krasnowodsk, over Kaspian to Pahlevi, Teheran
                  and finally ended up in Palestine near Gedera where in Bashit Camp, after assembly of
                  all Junackie kompanys, we were sorted up by age into various schools. Later I learned that my sister, falsifying her age, joined "Pestki" ( Pomocnicza Sluzba Kobiet)  and was assigned as a staff car driver in Scotland.  My Father was discharged after contracting typhus and was send with civilians to India, mother died in Krasnowodsk. Thanks to
                  the Red Cross, we managed to learn about each others whereabouts. In 1940, my
                  two oldest brothers were arrested by NKVD.  The oldest was murdered in Starobielsk
                  (Katyn Story), the next, younger, got 5 yrs sentence of hard labor. He was the one that
                  contacted us in Palestine. He was already in 3rd DSK (Karpatska Dywizja) in Quastina
                  camp.  From what I have seen,  there were thousands of civilians evacuated from USSR
                  and sent to India, Africa, Syria and Palestine.  There were Junackie Szkoly for boys and
                  "SMOK"  (Szkoly Mlodszych Ochotniczek) for girls, totaling over 4 thousands. Orphanages and other groups I'm not quite familiar with were also in existence. All this was under the watchful eyes of Gen. Anders and his "Drugi Korpus", 83,000 strong.
                  This can also be confirmed by the VCR tape: "BO WOLNOSC KRZYZAMI SIE MIERZY"
                  (AS CROSSES ARE MEASURE OF FREEDOM),    http://www.polart.com   
                  polart@...       it's in English and I believe it may be also in Polish.
                  I hop this will set the record straight.     583  or 542 is a far cry from 83,000.

                  Edward Bator (stary junak)


                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:

                  From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: frank@...
                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 3:57 PM

                  Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                  also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic...
                  Ed

                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                  From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                   

                  The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                   

                  Frank

                   


                  From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                  Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                   

                  This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                  Impossible.. .

                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                  From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                  Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                   

                  http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn- man’s-gulag-survival- story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151

                   

                   

                  Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                  PDF

                  Print

                  E-mail

                   

                  Staff Reports

                  Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                   

                  AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                  “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                  Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                  Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                  At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                  On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                  Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                  Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                  Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                  This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                   



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                • Antoni Kazimierski
                  Ed, Your account of joining Szkoly Junackie sounds very familiar to mine except I joined Junaki in Dzal-al-Abad. One difference is that I knew/met Mieczyslaw
                  Message 8 of 27 , Oct 26, 2009
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                    Ed,
                    Your account of joining Szkoly Junackie sounds very familiar to mine except I joined Junaki in Dzal-al-Abad.
                    One difference  is that I knew/met Mieczyslaw Bator and not Edward; is it the same person?
                    We were in IV company in Barbara - following  Bashit camp and Quastina.
                    In Pamieci book of Kadetow Ed ( Edward) is not listed, but Mieczyslaw is there.
                     
                    You mention 'BO WOLNOSC KRZYZAMI SIE MIERZY' - presumably by Franciszek Koprowski.
                    I have this copy in Polish, but cannot see any accounts/ figures. It is a book describing 'Szlak Wedrowki Wojennej Autora' and deals with Korpus Sanitarny where Pan Koprowski served; having escaped via Wegry to Jugoslawia, to Irak and to Syria. Later to  Tobruk and the Italian campaign and England.
                     
                    Is it something else you mean where  the same title is used?
                    antoni530
                  • ed Bator
                    Hi!  antoni530 Nice to hear from ex junak.  Mieczyslaw Bator, you are mentioning (there were two of them in Szkola Kadecka in 3rd or 4th company, I do not
                    Message 9 of 27 , Oct 26, 2009
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                      Hi!  antoni530
                      Nice to hear from ex junak.  Mieczyslaw Bator, you are mentioning (there were two of
                      them in Szkola Kadecka in 3rd or 4th company, I do not remember which, one of them was my brother), enlisted in Wrewsk as also my other brother Stanislaw who was in Starsza Junacka Szkola Powszechna, I (the youngest) was in Mlodsza Junackaj Szkola Powszecha in Nazareth.  Mietek in 1944 was transfered to 3ciej DSK and had a chance
                      to meet up with our older brother Stefan on Monte Casino.  Mietek wound up as a porucznik, Stefan chrazy,  Staszek i I ended our "junactwo" in  VI Junackie Gimnazjum Mechanicznym in Sarafand and Kfar Billu, Palestine.  Surviving family got together in England except sister Halina who married and returned to Poland before male part of the family got there. At first we lived in Petworth Camp, Sussex, later mowed to Huddersfield, Bradford, Nottingham and Hemsworth, York's. Brothers got married and this is a reason for various towns. Father returned to Poland after many years to be buried by His mother in Chocznia  near Wadowice.  Brothers remained in England and now only Staszek is left in Bradford.  I left England in 1955 to enlist in the US Army under Lodge Act provisions. Now retired after 20 yrs of service in beautiful Golfing Area near Pinehurst North Carolina.

                      The Anders numbers I stated was taken from "Polish contribution to World War II - Wikipedia, the free encyklopedia"     http://en.wikipedia.org./wiki/Polish contribution to
                      World War II.

                      There is a great selection of information that is not widely known.

                      Junacy were signed up in many places, and in Teheran, Persia, you could see as they
                      were arriving to one of the Persian hangars on their than airfield covered with gravel.
                      Closer to the mountains, Polish civilians were occupying some buildings as they were
                      coming in many transports.  As a 9-yrs old, I have seen it and remember it all.

                      Czesc antoni530


                      10/26/09, Antoni Kazimierski <ASKAZIMIERSKI@...> wrote:

                      From: Antoni Kazimierski <ASKAZIMIERSKI@...>
                      Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Monday, October 26, 2009, 8:29 AM

                       

                      Ed,
                      Your account of joining Szkoly Junackie sounds very familiar to mine except I joined Junaki in Dzal-al-Abad.
                      One difference  is that I knew/met Mieczyslaw Bator and not Edward; is it the same person?
                      We were in IV company in Barbara - following  Bashit camp and Quastina.
                      In Pamieci book of Kadetow Ed ( Edward) is not listed, but Mieczyslaw is there.
                       
                      You mention 'BO WOLNOSC KRZYZAMI SIE MIERZY' - presumably by Franciszek Koprowski.
                      I have this copy in Polish, but cannot see any accounts/ figures. It is a book describing 'Szlak Wedrowki Wojennej Autora' and deals with Korpus Sanitarny where Pan Koprowski served; having escaped via Wegry to Jugoslawia, to Irak and to Syria. Later to  Tobruk and the Italian campaign and England.
                       
                      Is it something else you mean where  the same title is used?
                      antoni530

                    • Ralph Apel
                      Yes misleading but attrition in the Gulag was high. My father was in Camp 48 Baltic-White Sea Canal. 2000 Polish soldiers marched in; only 300 marched out.
                      Message 10 of 27 , Oct 26, 2009
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                        Yes misleading but attrition in the Gulag was high.

                        My father was in Camp 48 Baltic-White Sea Canal. 2000 Polish soldiers
                        marched in; only 300 marched out.






                        tefan Wisniowski (KS) wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Dear Ed
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Of course you are right, over 115,000 made it out with Anders, and
                        > others with Berling and so on. I think the book means only 583 POWs
                        > joined Anders coming from this one GULAG, but the quote is misleading
                        > to say the least.
                        >
                        >
                        > Stefan Wisniowski
                        >
                        > Sydney
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > *From:* Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                        > [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *Ed Bachorz
                        > *Sent:* Monday, October 26, 2009 1:36 AM
                        > *To:* Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                        > *Subject:* Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival
                        > story
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                        > Impossible...
                        >
                        > --- On *Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk
                        > /<lucyna.artymiuk@...>/* wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@...>
                        > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                        > To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, 300PolishSquadron@yahoogroups.com
                        > Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > http://www.kpcnews com/index. php?option=
                        > com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn-
                        > man’s-gulag-survival- story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151
                        > <http://www.kpcnews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book-tells-Auburn-man%27s-gulag-survival-story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > *Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story
                        > <http://www.kpcnews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7671:Book-tells-Auburn-man%E2%80%99s-gulag-survival-story&catid=174:features&Itemid=151>
                        > *
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > PDF
                        > <http://www.kpcnews.com/index.php?view=article&catid=174%3Afeatures&id=7671%3ABook-tells-Auburn-man%E2%80%99s-gulag-survival-story&format=pdf&option=com_content&Itemid=151>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Print
                        > <http://www.kpcnews.com/index.php?view=article&catid=174%3Afeatures&id=7671%3ABook-tells-Auburn-man%E2%80%99s-gulag-survival-story&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=151>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > E-mail
                        > <http://www.kpcnews.com/index.php?option=com_mailto&tmpl=component&link=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5rcGNuZXdzLmNvbS9pbmRleC5waHA/b3B0aW9uPWNvbV9jb250ZW50JnZpZXc9YXJ0aWNsZSZpZD03NjcxOkJvb2stdGVsbHMtQXVidXJuLW1hbuKAmXMtZ3VsYWctc3Vydml2YWwtc3RvcnkmY2F0aWQ9MTc0OmZlYXR1cmVzJkl0ZW1pZD0xNTE=>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Staff Reports
                        >
                        > Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been
                        > published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                        > “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the
                        > publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                        > Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father,
                        > Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                        > Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the
                        > Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian
                        > concentration camp.
                        > At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly
                        > unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags,
                        > only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of
                        > them Kowalski.
                        > On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in
                        > Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the
                        > survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were
                        > deported by Stalin during the war.
                        > Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets
                        > invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed,
                        > imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months,
                        > women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and
                        > deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only
                        > about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                        > Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that
                        > the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who
                        > had suffered.
                        > Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to
                        > be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                        > This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years
                        > interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London ,
                        > England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • danutakelly
                        Ed and Antoni I had an Uncle Mietek Bator who passed away a couple of years ago in Nottingham. He was married to my Mothers sister Helena Wolinska who just
                        Message 11 of 27 , Oct 26, 2009
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                          Ed and Antoni
                          I had an Uncle Mietek Bator who passed away a couple of years ago in Nottingham. He was married to my Mothers sister Helena Wolinska who just passed away last week
                          Danuta
                          Western Australia

                          --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "Antoni Kazimierski" <ASKAZIMIERSKI@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Ed,
                          > Your account of joining Szkoly Junackie sounds very familiar to mine except I joined Junaki in Dzal-al-Abad.
                          > One difference is that I knew/met Mieczyslaw Bator and not Edward; is it the same person?
                          > We were in IV company in Barbara - following Bashit camp and Quastina.
                          > In Pamieci book of Kadetow Ed ( Edward) is not listed, but Mieczyslaw is there.
                          >
                          > You mention 'BO WOLNOSC KRZYZAMI SIE MIERZY' - presumably by Franciszek Koprowski.
                          > I have this copy in Polish, but cannot see any accounts/ figures. It is a book describing 'Szlak Wedrowki Wojennej Autora' and deals with Korpus Sanitarny where Pan Koprowski served; having escaped via Wegry to Jugoslawia, to Irak and to Syria. Later to Tobruk and the Italian campaign and England.
                          >
                          > Is it something else you mean where the same title is used?
                          > antoni530
                          >
                        • ed Bator
                          Halo Danuta.  Yes, you are right. Mietek was my brother married to Halina Wolinska, they have two sons: Irek and Janusz. You didn t mention your other aunts:
                          Message 12 of 27 , Oct 27, 2009
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                            Halo Danuta.  Yes, you are right. Mietek was my brother married to Halina Wolinska,
                            they have two sons: Irek and Janusz. You didn't mention your other aunts: Jadwiga,
                            Sabina (died in car accident many years ago) and Marysia.  Do you have a brother?
                            I remember writing to a son of Halinas sister in Australia when he and I were in Vietnam
                            in 1966.  So this means that we are related by marriage, it's a small world.
                            Ed.


                            --- On Mon, 10/26/09, danutakelly <cradia@...> wrote:

                            From: danutakelly <cradia@...>
                            Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Monday, October 26, 2009, 9:23 PM

                             

                            Ed and Antoni
                            I had an Uncle Mietek Bator who passed away a couple of years ago in Nottingham. He was married to my Mothers sister Helena Wolinska who just passed away last week
                            Danuta
                            Western Australia

                            --- In Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, "Antoni Kazimierski" <ASKAZIMIERSKI@ ...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Ed,
                            > Your account of joining Szkoly Junackie sounds very familiar to mine except I joined Junaki in Dzal-al-Abad.
                            > One difference is that I knew/met Mieczyslaw Bator and not Edward; is it the same person?
                            > We were in IV company in Barbara - following Bashit camp and Quastina.
                            > In Pamieci book of Kadetow Ed ( Edward) is not listed, but Mieczyslaw is there.
                            >
                            > You mention 'BO WOLNOSC KRZYZAMI SIE MIERZY' - presumably by Franciszek Koprowski.
                            > I have this copy in Polish, but cannot see any accounts/ figures. It is a book describing 'Szlak Wedrowki Wojennej Autora' and deals with Korpus Sanitarny where Pan Koprowski served; having escaped via Wegry to Jugoslawia, to Irak and to Syria. Later to Tobruk and the Italian campaign and England.
                            >
                            > Is it something else you mean where the same title is used?
                            > antoni530
                            >


                          • alex everist
                            The article had a number of mistakes. Including Kolyma as my father s wife s name. The actual information in the book is that 583 (my father was the one
                            Message 13 of 27 , Oct 27, 2009
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                            • 0 Attachment
                              The article had a number of mistakes. Including Kolyma as my father's wife's name. The actual information in the book is that 583 (my father was the one writing down the names and records) Polish prisoners of war (from 1939 invasion) who were sent to the gulags reached Persia in 1942.
                              The article may be wrong but the information in the book is correct.

                              Alexandra Everist
                              Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                              Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                              (the story of a young Pole's survival in the Soviet gulags)
                              www.alexandraeverist.com

                              --- On Mon, 10/26/09, Ralph Apel <Ralph.Apel@...> wrote:

                              From: Ralph Apel <Ralph.Apel@...>
                              Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Monday, October 26, 2009, 12:37 PM

                               

                              Yes misleading but attrition in the Gulag was high.

                              My father was in Camp 48 Baltic-White Sea Canal. 2000 Polish soldiers
                              marched in; only 300 marched out.

                              tefan Wisniowski (KS) wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > Dear Ed
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Of course you are right, over 115,000 made it out with Anders, and
                              > others with Berling and so on. I think the book means only 583 POWs
                              > joined Anders coming from this one GULAG, but the quote is misleading
                              > to say the least.
                              >
                              >
                              > Stefan Wisniowski
                              >
                              > Sydney
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > *From:* Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                              > [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com] *On Behalf Of *Ed Bachorz
                              > *Sent:* Monday, October 26, 2009 1:36 AM
                              > *To:* Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                              > *Subject:* Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival
                              > story
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                              > Impossible.. .
                              >
                              > --- On *Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk
                              > /<lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>/* wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                              > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                              > To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                              > Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option=
                              > com_content& view=article& id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn-
                              > man’s-gulag-survival- story&catid= 174:features& Itemid=151
                              > <http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_content& view=article& id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn- man%27s-gulag- survival- story&catid= 174:features& Itemid=151>
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > *Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story
                              > <http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_content& view=article& id=7671:Book- tells-Auburn- man%E2%80% 99s-gulag- survival- story&catid= 174:features& Itemid=151>
                              > *
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > PDF
                              > <http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?view= article&catid= 174%3Afeatures& id=7671%3ABook- tells-Auburn- man%E2%80% 99s-gulag- survival- story&format= pdf&option= com_content& Itemid=151>
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Print
                              > <http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?view= article&catid= 174%3Afeatures& id=7671%3ABook- tells-Auburn- man%E2%80% 99s-gulag- survival- story&tmpl= component& print=1&layout= default&page= &option=com_ content&Itemid= 151>
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > E-mail
                              > <http://www.kpcnews. com/index. php?option= com_mailto& tmpl=component& link=aHR0cDovL3d 3dy5rcGNuZXdzLmN vbS9pbmRleC5waHA /b3B0aW9uPWNvbV9 jb250ZW50JnZpZXc 9YXJ0aWNsZSZpZD0 3NjcxOkJvb2stdGV sbHMtQXVidXJuLW1 hbuKAmXMtZ3VsYWc tc3Vydml2YWwtc3R vcnkmY2F0aWQ9MTc 0OmZlYXR1cmVzJkl 0ZW1pZD0xNTE=>
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Staff Reports
                              >
                              > Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been
                              > published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                              > “No Place to Call Home� is available from Amazon and through the
                              > publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                              > Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father,
                              > Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                              > Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the
                              > Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian
                              > concentration camp.
                              > At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly
                              > unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags,
                              > only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of
                              > them Kowalski.
                              > On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in
                              > Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the
                              > survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were
                              > deported by Stalin during the war.
                              > Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets
                              > invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed,
                              > imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months,
                              > women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and
                              > deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only
                              > about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                              > Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that
                              > the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who
                              > had suffered.
                              > Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to
                              > be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                              > This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years
                              > interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London ,
                              > England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >


                            • alex everist
                              Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had
                              Message 14 of 27 , Oct 27, 2009
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                                Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.
                                 
                                I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.
                                 
                                This is just the April transport to Persia.
                                 
                                Hope this helps.
                                Alexandra Everist
                                Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                www.alexandraeverist.com


                                --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:

                                From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                Cc: frank@...
                                Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM


                                From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                 

                                Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic...
                                Ed

                                --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                                From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                 

                                The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                 

                                Frank

                                 

                                This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                Impossible.. .

                                --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                 

                                 

                                Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                PDF

                                Print

                                E-mail

                                 

                                Staff Reports

                                Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                 

                                AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                 



                                --
                                This message has been scanned for viruses and
                                dangerous content by Redstation Limited, and is
                                believed to be clean.



                              • John Halucha
                                Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too. Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and
                                Message 15 of 27 , Oct 27, 2009
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                                  Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too.
                                  Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and uncle, Jan and Jakub Hałucha, were both in the Polish military and imprisoned by the Soviets at the Pieczorlag (Pechorlag) gulag, both released in September 11, 1941 and both in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Any tiniest shred of information your father might be able to provide would be a treasure.
                                  Apparently, my father and uncle and a third man had somehow procured a few basic medical supplies and from time to time treated fellow Poles heading south, earning them the nickname "The Three Doctors". It's a huge long shot, I know, but does that ring any bells?

                                  John Halucha
                                  Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                                  From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 5:35:15 PM
                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                  Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.
                                   
                                  I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.
                                   
                                  This is just the April transport to Persia.
                                   
                                  Hope this helps.
                                  Alexandra Everist
                                  Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                  Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                  www.alexandraeverist.com


                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:

                                  From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                  Cc: frank@...
                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                  Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                  also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic...
                                  Ed

                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                                  From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                   

                                  The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                   

                                  Frank

                                   


                                  From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                  Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                   

                                  This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                  Impossible.. .

                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                  From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                  Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                   

                                   

                                  Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                  PDF

                                  Print

                                  E-mail

                                   

                                  Staff Reports

                                  Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                   

                                  AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                  “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                  Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                  Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                  At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                  On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                  Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                  Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                  Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                  This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                   



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                                  dangerous content by Redstation Limited, and is
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                                • Frank Pleszak
                                  Alex, The figure represents the number that were released from Kolyma. The same figure appears in Anders book An Army in Exile - Chapter 7 Kolyma Means
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Oct 27, 2009
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                                    Alex,

                                     

                                    The figure represents the number that were released from Kolyma . The same figure appears in Anders’ book ‘An Army in Exile’ – Chapter 7 ‘ Kolyma Means Death’ – “A very conservative estimate would establish the number of Polish citizens at Kolyma from 1940 to 1941 as more than 10,000. In the case of Kolyma , as in other instances, the Soviet authorities did not keep their promise to release the Poles. Of all the Poles sent there, only 583 were reported to have been set free, but in fact, few of them ever reached my army.”  Later in the book he suggests that only 171 made it to the army!

                                     

                                    I believe there are at least 4 members of the group whose father’s were in Kolyma , Alex, myself, Ronald Aksnowicz, and Lidia (Dubicka) Donahue.

                                     

                                    Frank

                                     


                                    From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of alex everist
                                    Sent: 27 October 2009 21:35
                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                     

                                    Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma ). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia . Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.

                                     

                                    I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.

                                     

                                    This is just the April transport to Persia .

                                     

                                    Hope this helps.

                                    Alexandra Everist

                                    Author of "A Katrina Moment"

                                    Co-Author of " No Place to Call Home"

                                    www.alexandraeverist.com


                                    --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:


                                    From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                    Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                    Cc: frank@...
                                    Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                    Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                    also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic ...
                                    Ed

                                    --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:


                                    From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                    Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                     

                                    The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                     

                                    Frank

                                     


                                    From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                    Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                     

                                    This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                    Impossible.. .

                                    --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                    From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                    Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                     

                                     

                                    Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                    PDF

                                    Print

                                    E-mail

                                     

                                    Staff Reports

                                    Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                     

                                    AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                    “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                    Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                    Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                    At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                    On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                    Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                    Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                    Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                    This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                     



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                                    dangerous content by Redstation Limited, and is
                                    believed to be clean.



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                                  • danutakelly
                                    Ed Yes we are related through marriage. My Mother Regina was the eldest of the Wolinska girls and died a few years back. Jadwiga died earlier this year so
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Oct 27, 2009
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                                      Ed
                                      Yes we are related through marriage. My Mother Regina was the eldest of the Wolinska girls and died a few years back. Jadwiga died earlier this year so this only leaves Marysia.I was in Nottingham at Christmas time and had Christmas Day lunch with Halina, Marysia, Ted (my brother) and Mark (Sabina's son) at Marysia's.
                                      Yes again!!! My brother Stan was in the Australian Army in Vietnam. My eldest brother Chris lived with Mum and Felik for some 10 years.
                                      Wow - this is a small world.!!!!!!!!!!!!!
                                      Danuta Kelly (Klysz)
                                      Western Australia

                                      --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, ed Bator <edijadzia@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Halo Danuta.  Yes, you are right. Mietek was my brother married to Halina Wolinska,
                                      > they have two sons: Irek and Janusz. You didn't mention your other aunts: Jadwiga,
                                      > Sabina (died in car accident many years ago) and Marysia.  Do you have a brother?
                                      > I remember writing to a son of Halinas sister in Australia when he and I were in Vietnam
                                      > in 1966.  So this means that we are related by marriage, it's a small world.
                                      > Ed.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --- On Mon, 10/26/09, danutakelly <cradia@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > From: danutakelly <cradia@...>
                                      > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                      > To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Date: Monday, October 26, 2009, 9:23 PM
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >  
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Ed and Antoni
                                      >
                                      > I had an Uncle Mietek Bator who passed away a couple of years ago in Nottingham. He was married to my Mothers sister Helena Wolinska who just passed away last week
                                      >
                                      > Danuta
                                      >
                                      > Western Australia
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --- In Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, "Antoni Kazimierski" <ASKAZIMIERSKI@ ...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      > > Ed,
                                      >
                                      > > Your account of joining Szkoly Junackie sounds very familiar to mine except I joined Junaki in Dzal-al-Abad.
                                      >
                                      > > One difference is that I knew/met Mieczyslaw Bator and not Edward; is it the same person?
                                      >
                                      > > We were in IV company in Barbara - following Bashit camp and Quastina.
                                      >
                                      > > In Pamieci book of Kadetow Ed ( Edward) is not listed, but Mieczyslaw is there.
                                      >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      > > You mention 'BO WOLNOSC KRZYZAMI SIE MIERZY' - presumably by Franciszek Koprowski.
                                      >
                                      > > I have this copy in Polish, but cannot see any accounts/ figures. It is a book describing 'Szlak Wedrowki Wojennej Autora' and deals with Korpus Sanitarny where Pan Koprowski served; having escaped via Wegry to Jugoslawia, to Irak and to Syria. Later to Tobruk and the Italian campaign and England.
                                      >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      > > Is it something else you mean where the same title is used?
                                      >
                                      > > antoni530
                                      >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                    • alex everist
                                      Thank you so much for the clarification. I guess my father was just recorcding those from Kolyma. Alexandra Everist Author of A Katrina Moment Co-Author of
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Oct 28, 2009
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                                        Thank you so much for the clarification. I guess my father was just recorcding those from Kolyma.

                                        Alexandra Everist
                                        Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                        Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                        (the story of a young Pole's survival in the Soviet gulags)
                                        www.alexandraeverist.com

                                        --- On Tue, 10/27/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                                        From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                        Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                        To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                        Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 5:15 PM

                                         

                                        Alex,

                                         

                                        The figure represents the number that were released from Kolyma . The same figure appears in Anders’ book ‘An Army in Exile’ – Chapter 7 ‘ Kolyma Means Death’ – “A very conservative estimate would establish the number of Polish citizens at Kolyma from 1940 to 1941 as more than 10,000. In the case of Kolyma , as in other instances, the Soviet authorities did not keep their promise to release the Poles. Of all the Poles sent there, only 583 were reported to have been set free, but in fact, few of them ever reached my army.”  Later in the book he suggests that only 171 made it to the army!

                                         

                                        I believe there are at least 4 members of the group whose father’s were in Kolyma , Alex, myself, Ronald Aksnowicz, and Lidia (Dubicka) Donahue.

                                         

                                        Frank

                                         


                                        From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of alex everist
                                        Sent: 27 October 2009 21:35
                                        To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                        Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                         

                                        Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma ). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia . Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.

                                         

                                        I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.

                                         

                                        This is just the April transport to Persia .

                                         

                                        Hope this helps.

                                        Alexandra Everist

                                        Author of "A Katrina Moment"

                                        Co-Author of " No Place to Call Home"

                                        www.alexandraeveris t.com


                                        --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@yahoo. com> wrote:


                                        From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@yahoo. com>
                                        Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                        To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                        Cc: frank@pleszak. com
                                        Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                        Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                        also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic ...
                                        Ed

                                        --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@pleszak. com> wrote:


                                        From: Frank Pleszak <frank@pleszak. com>
                                        Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                        To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                        Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                         

                                        The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                         

                                        Frank

                                         


                                        From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                        Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                        To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                        Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                         

                                        This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                        Impossible.. .

                                        --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                        From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                        Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                        To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                        Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                        Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                        PDF

                                        Print

                                        E-mail

                                         

                                        Staff Reports

                                        Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                         

                                        AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                        “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                        Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                        Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                        At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                        On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                        Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                        Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                        Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                        This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                         



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                                      • alex everist
                                        John: I m so sorry. I just asked him. He doesn t remember. He was not released until Dec 7, 1941. So they made it out much earlier than him.   He had been
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Oct 28, 2009
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                                          John:
                                          I'm so sorry. I just asked him. He doesn't remember. He was not released until Dec 7, 1941. So they made it out much earlier than him.
                                           
                                          He had been with a group of Poles that were released earlier, but some in the group revolted against being sent out to work in Magadan. So the entire group was sent back to the gulag, 10th OLP.
                                           
                                          Alexandra Everist
                                          Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                          Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                          (the story of a young Pole's survival in the Soviet gulags)
                                          www.alexandraeverist.com

                                          --- On Tue, 10/27/09, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:

                                          From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                                          Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 5:10 PM

                                          Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too.
                                          Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and uncle, Jan and Jakub Hałucha, were both in the Polish military and imprisoned by the Soviets at the Pieczorlag (Pechorlag) gulag, both released in September 11, 1941 and both in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Any tiniest shred of information your father might be able to provide would be a treasure.
                                          Apparently, my father and uncle and a third man had somehow procured a few basic medical supplies and from time to time treated fellow Poles heading south, earning them the nickname "The Three Doctors". It's a huge long shot, I know, but does that ring any bells?

                                          John Halucha
                                          Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                                          From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 5:35:15 PM
                                          Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                          Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.
                                           
                                          I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.
                                           
                                          This is just the April transport to Persia.
                                           
                                          Hope this helps.
                                          Alexandra Everist
                                          Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                          Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                          www.alexandraeverist.com


                                          --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:

                                          From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                          Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                          Cc: frank@...
                                          Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                          Frank

                                           


                                          From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                          Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                          To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                          Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                           

                                          Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                          also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic...
                                          Ed

                                          --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                                          From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                          Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                           

                                          The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                           

                                          This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                          Impossible.. .

                                          --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                          From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                          Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                          To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                          Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                           

                                           

                                           

                                          Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                          PDF

                                          Print

                                          E-mail

                                           

                                          Staff Reports

                                          Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                           

                                          AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                          “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                          Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                          Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                          At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                          On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                          Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                          Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                          Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                          This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                           



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                                        • Frank Pleszak
                                          My dad left much later. He didn t leave until after May 1942 so was lucky to get to Krasnovodsk by August. In Ron Aksnowicz s gallery are some pictures of his
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Oct 28, 2009
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                                            My dad left much later. He didn’t leave until after May 1942 so was lucky to get to Krasnovodsk by August.

                                             

                                            In Ron Aksnowicz’s gallery are some pictures of his father’s from Magadan, including a photo of a group of Poles at the cemetery. It includes Ron’s father, my father and the author/poet Anatol Krackowiecki but unfortunately not your father. It was your father that actually made me aware of the photo, as your brother sent me a copy, it is also in Krakowiecki’s 1959 book Książka o Kołymie (Book of Kolyma).

                                             

                                            Frank

                                             

                                             


                                            From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of alex everist
                                            Sent: 28 October 2009 21:08
                                            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                             

                                            John:

                                            I'm so sorry. I just asked him. He doesn't remember. He was not released until Dec 7, 1941. So they made it out much earlier than him.

                                             

                                            He had been with a group of Poles that were released earlier, but some in the group revolted against being sent out to work in Magadan. So the entire group was sent back to the gulag, 10th OLP.

                                             

                                            Alexandra Everist
                                            Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                            Co-Author of " No Place to Call Home"
                                            (the story of a young Pole's survival in the Soviet gulags)
                                            www.alexandraeverist.com

                                            --- On Tue, 10/27/09, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:


                                            From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                                            Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                            Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 5:10 PM

                                            Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too.
                                            Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and uncle, Jan and Jakub Hałucha, were both in the Polish military and imprisoned by the Soviets at the Pieczorlag (Pechorlag) gulag, both released in September 11, 1941 and both in the April 1942 transport to Persia . Any tiniest shred of information your father might be able to provide would be a treasure.
                                            Apparently, my father and uncle and a third man had somehow procured a few basic medical supplies and from time to time treated fellow Poles heading south, earning them the nickname "The Three Doctors". It's a huge long shot, I know, but does that ring any bells?

                                            John Halucha
                                            Sault Ste Marie , Canada

                                             


                                            From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                            Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 5:35:15 PM
                                            Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                            Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma ). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia . Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.

                                             

                                            I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.

                                             

                                            This is just the April transport to Persia .

                                             

                                            Hope this helps.

                                            Alexandra Everist

                                            Author of "A Katrina Moment"

                                            Co-Author of " No Place to Call Home"

                                            www.alexandraeverist.com


                                            --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:


                                            From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                            Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                            Cc: frank@...
                                            Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                            Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                            also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic ...
                                            Ed

                                            --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:


                                            From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                            Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                            To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                            Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                             

                                            The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                             

                                            Frank

                                             


                                            From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                            Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                            To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                            Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                             

                                            This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                            Impossible.. .

                                            --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                            From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                            Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                            To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                            Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                             

                                             

                                             

                                            Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                            PDF

                                            Print

                                            E-mail

                                             

                                            Staff Reports

                                            Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                             

                                            AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                            “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                            Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                            Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                            At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                            On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                            Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                            Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                            Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                            This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                             



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                                          • John Halucha
                                            That was really sweet of you, Alex. Maybe someone else will remember The Three Doctors I was told about many years ago. Dec. 7, 1941! Perhaps it is a date
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Oct 28, 2009
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                                              That was really sweet of you, Alex. Maybe someone else will remember "The Three Doctors" I was told about many years ago.

                                              Dec. 7, 1941! Perhaps it is a "date which will live in infamy" for some people, but your Dad's good fortune puts another light on it altogether.

                                              How wonderful that you still have your father to talk to, and that he has a daughter so gifted and willing to relate his life's story.

                                              John Halucha
                                              Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                                              From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                              Sent: Wed, October 28, 2009 5:07:37 PM
                                              Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                              John:
                                              I'm so sorry. I just asked him. He doesn't remember. He was not released until Dec 7, 1941. So they made it out much earlier than him.
                                               
                                              He had been with a group of Poles that were released earlier, but some in the group revolted against being sent out to work in Magadan. So the entire group was sent back to the gulag, 10th OLP.
                                               
                                              Alexandra Everist
                                              Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                              Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                              (the story of a young Pole's survival in the Soviet gulags)
                                              www.alexandraeverist.com

                                              --- On Tue, 10/27/09, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:

                                              From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                                              Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                              Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 5:10 PM

                                              Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too.
                                              Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and uncle, Jan and Jakub Hałucha, were both in the Polish military and imprisoned by the Soviets at the Pieczorlag (Pechorlag) gulag, both released in September 11, 1941 and both in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Any tiniest shred of information your father might be able to provide would be a treasure.
                                              Apparently, my father and uncle and a third man had somehow procured a few basic medical supplies and from time to time treated fellow Poles heading south, earning them the nickname "The Three Doctors". It's a huge long shot, I know, but does that ring any bells?

                                              John Halucha
                                              Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                                              From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                              Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 5:35:15 PM
                                              Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                              Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.
                                               
                                              I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.
                                               
                                              This is just the April transport to Persia.
                                               
                                              Hope this helps.
                                              Alexandra Everist
                                              Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                              Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                              www.alexandraeverist.com


                                              --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:

                                              From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                              Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                              Cc: frank@...
                                              Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                              Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                              also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic...
                                              Ed

                                              --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                                              From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                              Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                              Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                               

                                              The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                               

                                              Frank

                                               


                                              From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                              Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                              To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                              Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                               

                                              This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                              Impossible.. .

                                              --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                              From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                              Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                              To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                              Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                               

                                               

                                               

                                              Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                              PDF

                                              Print

                                              E-mail

                                               

                                              Staff Reports

                                              Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                               

                                              AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                              “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                              Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                              Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                              At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                              On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                              Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                              Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                              Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                              This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                               



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                                            • alex everist
                                              You must read the chapter on the day that lives in infamy. He. of course, had no idea what was going on in that part of the world. In his mind it was a date
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Oct 28, 2009
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                                                You must read the chapter on the day that lives in infamy. He. of course, had no idea what was going on in that part of the world. In his mind it was a date that changed the rest of the war for him. And it was.

                                                --- On Wed, 10/28/09, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:

                                                From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                                                Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                Date: Wednesday, October 28, 2009, 6:22 PM

                                                That was really sweet of you, Alex. Maybe someone else will remember "The Three Doctors" I was told about many years ago.

                                                Dec. 7, 1941! Perhaps it is a "date which will live in infamy" for some people, but your Dad's good fortune puts another light on it altogether.

                                                How wonderful that you still have your father to talk to, and that he has a daughter so gifted and willing to relate his life's story.

                                                John Halucha
                                                Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                                                From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                Sent: Wed, October 28, 2009 5:07:37 PM
                                                Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                John:
                                                I'm so sorry. I just asked him. He doesn't remember. He was not released until Dec 7, 1941. So they made it out much earlier than him.
                                                 
                                                He had been with a group of Poles that were released earlier, but some in the group revolted against being sent out to work in Magadan. So the entire group was sent back to the gulag, 10th OLP.
                                                 
                                                Alexandra Everist
                                                Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                                Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                                (the story of a young Pole's survival in the Soviet gulags)
                                                www.alexandraeverist.com

                                                --- On Tue, 10/27/09, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:

                                                From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                                                Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 5:10 PM

                                                Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too.
                                                Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and uncle, Jan and Jakub Hałucha, were both in the Polish military and imprisoned by the Soviets at the Pieczorlag (Pechorlag) gulag, both released in September 11, 1941 and both in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Any tiniest shred of information your father might be able to provide would be a treasure.
                                                Apparently, my father and uncle and a third man had somehow procured a few basic medical supplies and from time to time treated fellow Poles heading south, earning them the nickname "The Three Doctors". It's a huge long shot, I know, but does that ring any bells?

                                                John Halucha
                                                Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                                                From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 5:35:15 PM
                                                Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.
                                                 
                                                I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.
                                                 
                                                This is just the April transport to Persia.
                                                 
                                                Hope this helps.
                                                Alexandra Everist
                                                Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                                Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                                www.alexandraeverist.com


                                                --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:

                                                From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                                Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                Cc: frank@...
                                                Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                                Frank

                                                 


                                                From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                                Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                                To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                 

                                                Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                                also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic...
                                                Ed

                                                --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                                                From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                                Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                                 

                                                The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                                 


                                                From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                                Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                                Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                                 

                                                 

                                                 

                                                This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                                Impossible.. .

                                                --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:

                                                Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                                PDF

                                                Print

                                                E-mail

                                                 

                                                Staff Reports

                                                Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                                 

                                                AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                                “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                                Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                                Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                                At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                                On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                                Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                                Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                                Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                                This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                                 



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                                              • alex everist
                                                Many were kept in Magadan until the spring thaw. They must have been treated rather well since they all looked surprisingly healthy. The picture is in the book
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Oct 28, 2009
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                                                  Many were kept in Magadan until the spring thaw. They must have been treated rather well since they all looked surprisingly healthy. The picture is in the book "No Place to Call Home".

                                                  Alexandra Everist
                                                  Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                                  Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                                  (the story of a young Pole's survival in the Soviet gulags)
                                                  www.alexandraeverist.com

                                                  --- On Wed, 10/28/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                                                  From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Date: Wednesday, October 28, 2009, 4:29 PM

                                                   

                                                  My dad left much later. He didn’t leave until after May 1942 so was lucky to get to Krasnovodsk by August.

                                                   

                                                  In Ron Aksnowicz’s gallery are some pictures of his father’s from Magadan, including a photo of a group of Poles at the cemetery. It includes Ron’s father, my father and the author/poet Anatol Krackowiecki but unfortunately not your father. It was your father that actually made me aware of the photo, as your brother sent me a copy, it is also in Krakowiecki’s 1959 book Książka o Kołymie (Book of Kolyma).

                                                   

                                                  Frank

                                                   

                                                   


                                                  From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of alex everist
                                                  Sent: 28 October 2009 21:08
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                   

                                                  John:

                                                  I'm so sorry. I just asked him. He doesn't remember. He was not released until Dec 7, 1941. So they made it out much earlier than him.

                                                   

                                                  He had been with a group of Poles that were released earlier, but some in the group revolted against being sent out to work in Magadan. So the entire group was sent back to the gulag, 10th OLP.

                                                   

                                                  Alexandra Everist
                                                  Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                                  Co-Author of " No Place to Call Home"
                                                  (the story of a young Pole's survival in the Soviet gulags)
                                                  www.alexandraeveris t.com

                                                  --- On Tue, 10/27/09, John Halucha <john.halucha@ yahoo.com> wrote:


                                                  From: John Halucha <john.halucha@ yahoo.com>
                                                  Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 5:10 PM

                                                  Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too.
                                                  Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and uncle, Jan and Jakub Hałucha, were both in the Polish military and imprisoned by the Soviets at the Pieczorlag (Pechorlag) gulag, both released in September 11, 1941 and both in the April 1942 transport to Persia . Any tiniest shred of information your father might be able to provide would be a treasure.
                                                  Apparently, my father and uncle and a third man had somehow procured a few basic medical supplies and from time to time treated fellow Poles heading south, earning them the nickname "The Three Doctors". It's a huge long shot, I know, but does that ring any bells?

                                                  John Halucha
                                                  Sault Ste Marie , Canada

                                                   


                                                  From: alex everist <allie1417@yahoo. com>
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 5:35:15 PM
                                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                  Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma ). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia . Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.

                                                   

                                                  I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.

                                                   

                                                  This is just the April transport to Persia .

                                                   

                                                  Hope this helps.

                                                  Alexandra Everist

                                                  Author of "A Katrina Moment"

                                                  Co-Author of " No Place to Call Home"

                                                  www.alexandraeveris t.com


                                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@yahoo. com> wrote:


                                                  From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@yahoo. com>
                                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Cc: frank@pleszak. com
                                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                                  Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                                  also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic ...
                                                  Ed

                                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@pleszak. com> wrote:


                                                  From: Frank Pleszak <frank@pleszak. com>
                                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                                   

                                                  The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                                   

                                                  Frank

                                                   


                                                  From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                                  Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                   

                                                  This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                                  Impossible.. .

                                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                                  From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                                  Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                                   

                                                   

                                                   

                                                  Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                                  PDF

                                                  Print

                                                  E-mail

                                                   

                                                  Staff Reports

                                                  Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                                   

                                                  AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                                  “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                                  Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                                  Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                                  At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                                  On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                                  Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                                  Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                                  Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                                  This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                                   



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                                                • alex everist
                                                  Can anyone identify the people in this photo? It is in the book.   I love the power of the internet. There could never have been a point in time where we
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Oct 28, 2009
                                                  View Source
                                                  Can anyone identify the people in this photo? It is in the book.
                                                   
                                                  I love the power of the internet. There could never have been a point in time where we could communicate with so many who cared about the same things.

                                                  --- On Tue, 10/27/09, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:

                                                  From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                                                  Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 5:10 PM

                                                  Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too.
                                                  Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and uncle, Jan and Jakub Hałucha, were both in the Polish military and imprisoned by the Soviets at the Pieczorlag (Pechorlag) gulag, both released in September 11, 1941 and both in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Any tiniest shred of information your father might be able to provide would be a treasure.
                                                  Apparently, my father and uncle and a third man had somehow procured a few basic medical supplies and from time to time treated fellow Poles heading south, earning them the nickname "The Three Doctors". It's a huge long shot, I know, but does that ring any bells?

                                                  John Halucha
                                                  Sault Ste Marie, Canada


                                                  From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 5:35:15 PM
                                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                  Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia. Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.
                                                   
                                                  I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.
                                                   
                                                  This is just the April transport to Persia.
                                                   
                                                  Hope this helps.
                                                  Alexandra Everist
                                                  Author of "A Katrina Moment"
                                                  Co-Author of "No Place to Call Home"
                                                  www.alexandraeverist.com


                                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:

                                                  From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Cc: frank@...
                                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                                  Frank

                                                   


                                                  From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                                  Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                   

                                                  Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                                  also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic...
                                                  Ed

                                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:

                                                  From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                                  Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                                   

                                                  The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                                   

                                                  This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                                  Impossible.. .

                                                  --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                                  From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                                  Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                                  Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                                   

                                                   

                                                   

                                                  Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                                  PDF

                                                  Print

                                                  E-mail

                                                   

                                                  Staff Reports

                                                  Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                                   

                                                  AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                                  “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                                  Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                                  Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                                  At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                                  On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                                  Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                                  Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                                  Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                                  This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                                   



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                                                  dangerous content by Redstation Limited, and is
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                                                  Instant message from any web browser! Try the new Yahoo! Canada Messenger for the Web BETA
                                                • Frank Pleszak
                                                  Hi Alex, It definitely is in Ron Aksnowicz s fathers photos. Have a look at http://kresy-siberia.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=8742 All the best Frank _____
                                                  Message 25 of 27 , Oct 29, 2009
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                                                    Hi Alex,

                                                     

                                                    It definitely is in Ron Aksnowicz’s fathers photos. Have a look at

                                                     

                                                    http://kresy-siberia.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=8742

                                                     

                                                    All the best

                                                     

                                                    Frank

                                                     


                                                    From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of alex everist
                                                    Sent: 29 October 2009 04:01
                                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                     

                                                    Can anyone identify the people in this photo? It is in the book.

                                                     

                                                    I love the power of the internet. There could never have been a point in time where we could communicate with so many who cared about the same things.

                                                    --- On Tue, 10/27/09, John Halucha <john.halucha@...> wrote:


                                                    From: John Halucha <john.halucha@...>
                                                    Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 5:10 PM

                                                    Thanks for this, Alex, and please bless your father too.
                                                    Do you actually have a list of names of the 583? To the best of my knowledge, my late father and uncle, Jan and Jakub Hałucha, were both in the Polish military and imprisoned by the Soviets at the Pieczorlag (Pechorlag) gulag, both released in September 11, 1941 and both in the April 1942 transport to Persia . Any tiniest shred of information your father might be able to provide would be a treasure.
                                                    Apparently, my father and uncle and a third man had somehow procured a few basic medical supplies and from time to time treated fellow Poles heading south, earning them the nickname "The Three Doctors". It's a huge long shot, I know, but does that ring any bells?

                                                    John Halucha
                                                    Sault Ste Marie , Canada

                                                     


                                                    From: alex everist <allie1417@...>
                                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 5:35:15 PM
                                                    Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                    Sorry for all the confusion. My father was just listing Polish prisoners of war (captured in 1939) that he recorded before they traveled to Persia (He had been in Kolyma ). There were obviously many others released (but may not not have been recorded at that time as Polish prisoners of war from the gulags) in the April 1942 transport to Persia . Many were from Siberian labor camps.I also know there were others released but many were held until the spring of 42 (the ice had blocked many others from departing). My father was released the end of Dec, 1941.

                                                     

                                                    I am with my father right now. I just asked my father again about it and he said it was 583 from various gulags that he recorded released from the gulags going to Persia in April 1942 . He is very adamant about the number he recorded. He is so convinced of that number, I have to believe him. It is the same number he has stated all along from the papers he wrote down right after the war.

                                                     

                                                    This is just the April transport to Persia .

                                                     

                                                    Hope this helps.

                                                    Alexandra Everist

                                                    Author of "A Katrina Moment"

                                                    Co-Author of " No Place to Call Home"

                                                    www.alexandraeverist.com


                                                    --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...> wrote:


                                                    From: Ed Bachorz <etbachorz@...>
                                                    Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Cc: frank@...
                                                    Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:57 PM

                                                    Thanks for clearing that up...My Dad survived the gulags and made it to Persia
                                                    also, albeit from Siewzeldorlag, Komi Republic ...
                                                    Ed

                                                    --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Frank Pleszak <frank@...> wrote:


                                                    From: Frank Pleszak <frank@...>
                                                    Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:53 PM

                                                     

                                                    The number represents those who made it from the dreaded GULags of Kolyma. My dad was one.

                                                     

                                                    Frank

                                                     


                                                    From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy- Siberia@yahoogro ups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                                    Sent: 25 October 2009 14:36
                                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
                                                    Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story

                                                     

                                                    This can't be accurate-only 542 Poles made it to Anders Army?
                                                    Impossible.. .

                                                    --- On Sun, 10/25/09, Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com> wrote:


                                                    From: Lucyna Artymiuk <lucyna.artymiuk@ bigpond.com>
                                                    Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Book tells Auburn man's gulag survival story
                                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, 300PolishSquadron@ yahoogroups. com
                                                    Date: Sunday, October 25, 2009, 11:40 AM

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                    Book tells Auburn man’s gulag survival story

                                                    PDF

                                                    Print

                                                    E-mail

                                                     

                                                    Staff Reports

                                                    Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:20

                                                     

                                                    AUBURN — A new book telling an Auburn man’s World War II saga has been published by JimSam Inc., the company announced.
                                                    “No Place to Call Home” is available from Amazon and through the publisher at jimsaminc.com.
                                                    Colorado author Alexandra Everist wrote the book about her father, Stanley Kowalski, 89, who now resides in Auburn .
                                                    Kowalski lived in Poland at age 19, when he was captured by the Soviets at the beginning of World War II and sent to a Siberian concentration camp.
                                                    At a series of prisons and gulags, Kowalski survived the nearly unsurvivable. Of the unknown thousands sent to the Siberian gulags, only 583 Polish prisoners of war would reach Persia in 1942 — one of them Kowalski.
                                                    On Memorial Day this year at The National Military History Center in Auburn , Kowalski received a Siberian Cross. The medal honors the survivors among the 1 million to 2 million Polish citizens who were deported by Stalin during the war.
                                                    Seventeen days after Hitler’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Soviets invaded eastern Poland . Captured Polish soldiers were executed, imprisoned or sent to concentration camps in Siberia . Within months, women and men, children and elderly were driven out of Poland and deported to labor camps in Siberia , Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan . Only about 250,000 ever returned from the Soviet Union .
                                                    Although democracy came to Poland in 1990, it was not until 2004 that the Siberian Cross was established to officially recognize those who had suffered.
                                                    Kowalski and his second wife, Kolyma, moved to Auburn two years ago to be near one of his daughters, Victoria Chorpenning.
                                                    This is the second published book for Everist. She spent six years interviewing her father about his experiences. Born in London , England , she came to Chicago with her family in 1960.

                                                     



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                                                  • Ed Bachorz
                                                    Loved the photo gallery...My father, Czeslaw Bachorz, was a sergeant major in the 5KDP... In one of the photos a soldier is identified as Henryk
                                                    Message 26 of 27 , Oct 29, 2009
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                                                      Loved the photo gallery...My father, Czeslaw Bachorz, was a sergeant major in the 5KDP...
                                                      In one of the photos a soldier is identified as Henryk Kwiatowski...Is this the same
                                                      as Henryk de Kwiatowski, who later made fame & fortune in the USA as an entrepreneur
                                                      and owner of Calumet Farms in Kentucky?
                                                      Edward...

                                                    • raksnowicz
                                                      Thanks for the compliment. No my godfather Henryk Kwiatkowski is not the same person you mention. Ron _____ From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                      Message 27 of 27 , Oct 29, 2009
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                                                        Thanks for the compliment. No my godfather Henryk Kwiatkowski is not the same person you mention.

                                                         

                                                        Ron

                                                         


                                                        From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ed Bachorz
                                                        Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2009 4:17 PM
                                                        To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] RE: RON AKSNOWICZ

                                                         

                                                         

                                                        Loved the photo gallery...My father, Czeslaw Bachorz, was a sergeant major in the 5KDP...
                                                        In one of the photos a soldier is identified as Henryk Kwiatowski.. .Is this the same
                                                        as Henryk de Kwiatowski, who later made fame & fortune in the USA as an entrepreneur
                                                        and owner of Calumet Farms in Kentucky ?
                                                        Edward...

                                                         

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