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Train routes

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  • Beata Kalinska
    Dear Group, Re:train routes. There have been recent discussions of routes taken during the deportations, and the wonderful work of some of our members in
    Message 1 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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      Dear Group,
      Re:train routes. There have been recent discussions of routes taken during the deportations, and the wonderful work of some of our members in getting the list of trains, translated and into the group resouces. While further musing on these I came across the account by Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik.

      Zofia Ptasnik was deported in April 1940 from the family estate in Szczeploty in western Ukraine to the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan. She kept a diary on the journey and beyond. The diary miraculously survived, has been translated, published in 5 parts in the Sarmatian Review and is on the web at:

      www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia

      where it can be read in its entirety.

      For the myself and the group I have extracted below from the account all references to PLACES along the route, the time frame, with references as well as to other trains that the transport Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik was on met along the route. With a good map of the territory inferences can be made from this as to the possible journeys of our parents and grandparents at this time and on the other 3 transport dates.

      The knock at midnight comes on April 13.

      Sunday, April 14, 1940 at 7am she joins others at JAWOROW. People are also being brought here from Niemirow and the train waits the entire day as new people are brought from the town of Jaworow itself and the surrounding villages. There are two women from Ulicko. (Jaworow, I looked up, is 30 miles west of Lwow)

      The train consists of 40 cars, each boxcar containing 30 people.

      She is writing from Podzamcze (Lwow freight railway station) and describes a morning transfer onto a Russian wide-guage boxcar. There is much activity at the station with news going around of at least ten long trains passing through the station filled with people from Lwow.

      Monday, April 15 at 5am the train finally leaves LWOW. The train passes KRASNE then SKWARZEW. At 8am it is at ZADWORZE. 11am ZLOCZOW. They meet a train packed with people from Jaworow. 12.30 PLUCZKOW. 3pm JEZIERNA. Evening HLUBOCZYK WIELK, TARNOPOL where they meet a train with people deported from Przemysl, Grodek and Chodorow. The train stops for the night at MAKSYMOWKA ( Maksymovka)where it leaves early the next morning.

      Tuesday, April 16, BOGDANOWK (Bohdanovka) and POWLOCZYSKA(Povlochyska) around 9am ZBRUCZand halts at WOLOCZYSKA(Volochyska). By this time they have been locked up for 2 long days and nights.

      Wednesday, April 17 the train has been on the move all night and many miles now separate them from Poland. 7am the train stops at ZHMIRINKA. There are trains with people deprted from Przemysl, Chodorow, Podhajec, Rohatyn pulled by "magnificent locomotives that roar steam power." At Zhmirinka they are at last given a bucket of water. WINNICA (Vynnytsa). 6.30pm KALYNIVKA (Koziatyn). During the night the train passes KIEV.

      Thursday, April 18, YEZHYN, 8am. They still have no idea of where they are going. BERELYZH1pm. DYAKONOVO.

      Friday, April 19, KURSK They meet trains with deportees from Przemysl, Sadowa, Wisznia and Grodek. And another train from Lwow had just left the station. More trains from Podhajec, Chodorow and Przemysl.

      Saturday, April 20. PLESHKOV-CHEREMISINOVO.
      In the morning they pass KALORSK and VORONEZH This is the second week. GRYAZI (Hriasy) A station full of trains. PESKOVATKA. They meet a train from Nadrozna. KOCHETOVKA. After which they are overtaken by a train of people deported from Przemysl and Zimna Woda.

      Sunday, April 21, SVIZY (Sviazy) 9am. Meet a train from Grodek and Podhajce. After 9 days of travel it is still anybody's guess as to their final destination. BASHMAKOVO, PACHELMA

      Monday, April 22, KUZNETS. They meet a train from Sokal full of Red Army soldiers. NOVOSPASSKOE. SYZRAN. They arrive in SICZYN (Sichyn) on the Volga. MILANY. The train goes along the Volga " a beautiful wide river." BATRAKY-on-the-Volga.

      Tuesday, April 23, SAMARA. MARICHEVKA. BUZULUK.

      Wednesday, April 24 (In Asia) In the night they pass the Ural River. 2pm in ORENBURG.
      They had passed a train from Lesko and Sambor. 9pm AKBULAK (a journey of "2,200 miles)

      Thursday, April 25, 8am. AKTYUBINSK, KAZAKH SSR ( Soviet Republic of Kazakhstan)
      The train had arrrived the evening before and is "shunted back and forth" 9am They are unloaded and moved to a "road transport" (truck) At 3.30 pm they are loaded onto trucks. After 2 hours a 45 minute stop at NOVOROSSIISKOYE. In darkness they arrive at Sarsai, where their exile began. They have been confined in the boxcar for 12 and a half days. End of Part one of the diary.

      Introduction from the Samartian Review
      Daughter of Kajetan Malachowski and Aleksandra Peplowska, Zofia Ptasnik was born on March 14, 1890, at the family estate of Szczeploty in western Ukraine, a member of the substantial Polish minority in western Ukraine that became part of the Polish state after the Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920 and the Treaty of Riga (1922). In 1925 Zofia married Jan Ptasnik, Professor of History at Jan Kazimierz University, in Lviv (Lwów in Polish) and at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He husband died in 1930. They had one son named Mieczyslaw. After her husband's death, Mrs. Ptasnik administered the family estate between 1930-1939.
      Shortly after the outbreak of World War II on September 1, 1939, and the Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, Mrs. Ptasnik's sister, Jadwiga (Winia) Malachowska Popiel (Professor Bronislaw Popiel's widow) was arrested and deported to an unknown location in the Soviet northeast where she perished without a trace. Then on April 13, 1940, Zofia Ptasnik was arrested and deported to the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan where she was forced into slave labor. She died on July 25, 1941 and was buried in the steppe of northern Kazakhstan. A year later, the cross marking her grave gave way to a new railway line. Her Diary covers the period from April 14, 1940 to May 26, 1941.

      May she be remembered.
      Regards,
      Beata


      ---------------------------------
      Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo Mobile. Try it now.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI
      Beata, what an interesting historical record; Pani Ptasik was quite alert at the time and had facility to do this; sadly many trains were not opened for a long
      Message 2 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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        Beata,
        what an interesting historical record;
        Pani Ptasik was quite alert at the time and had facility to do this; sadly many trains were not opened for a long period of time and it was not possible to know/see the stations properly.
        One of our member's (Elzunia) Mom also recorded her journey.These are interesting events.
        antoni530

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Elizabeth
        Actually I was just about to mention this (great minds think alike, Antoni!) If you check the Files one the Yahoo site
        Message 3 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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          Actually I was just about to mention this (great minds think alike, Antoni!)



          If you check the Files one the Yahoo site

          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/> Files >
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/Personal_testimonies/>
          Personal_testimonies > Danuta's Diary



          You will find my mother's diary, in English and Polish, list of places she
          travelled through, a route map and other information on her osada.



          pozdrowienia

          Elzunia Olsson

          Sweden
          Gallery Administrator
          <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
          http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html



          _____

          From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
          On Behalf Of ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI
          Sent: Friday, November 23, 2007 6:51 PM
          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Train routes



          Beata,
          what an interesting historical record;
          Pani Ptasik was quite alert at the time and had facility to do this; sadly
          many trains were not opened for a long period of time and it was not
          possible to know/see the stations properly.
          One of our member's (Elzunia) Mom also recorded her journey.These are
          interesting events.
          antoni530

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • MARIE GAFFNEY
          HI BEATA and GROUP: How wonderful it must be to know the route taken. I have not been able to find the one that left Sarny (deportation date of 2/10/40)
          Message 4 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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            HI BEATA and GROUP:

            How wonderful it must be to know the route taken. I
            have not been able to find the one that left Sarny
            (deportation date of 2/10/40) arriving in "Szabryca"
            (closest spelling to the name I heard from my Mother
            and my adopted Aunt, Janina Ptak). All I know is that
            the journey itself took five weeks. When we left that
            train station, they put my Mom and me (five months
            old) on a sleigh and my Father walked alongside,
            arriving in Darovatka posiolek.

            If anyone has any information on that particular
            route, PLEASE, PLEASE advise!!! Thank you!!!

            BOZENA - Florida, USA

            --- Beata Kalinska <beatakalinska@...> wrote:

            > Dear Group,
            > Re:train routes. There have been recent
            > discussions of routes taken during the deportations,
            > and the wonderful work of some of our members in
            > getting the list of trains, translated and into the
            > group resouces. While further musing on these I came
            > across the account by Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik.
            >
            > Zofia Ptasnik was deported in April 1940 from the
            > family estate in Szczeploty in western Ukraine to
            > the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan. She kept a
            > diary on the journey and beyond. The diary
            > miraculously survived, has been translated,
            > published in 5 parts in the Sarmatian Review and is
            > on the web at:
            >
            > www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia
            >
            > where it can be read in its entirety.
            >
            > For the myself and the group I have extracted
            > below from the account all references to PLACES
            > along the route, the time frame, with references as
            > well as to other trains that the transport Zofia
            > Malachowska Ptasnik was on met along the route. With
            > a good map of the territory inferences can be made
            > from this as to the possible journeys of our parents
            > and grandparents at this time and on the other 3
            > transport dates.
            >
            > The knock at midnight comes on April 13.
            >
            > Sunday, April 14, 1940 at 7am she joins others at
            > JAWOROW. People are also being brought here from
            > Niemirow and the train waits the entire day as new
            > people are brought from the town of Jaworow itself
            > and the surrounding villages. There are two women
            > from Ulicko. (Jaworow, I looked up, is 30 miles west
            > of Lwow)
            >
            > The train consists of 40 cars, each boxcar
            > containing 30 people.
            >
            > She is writing from Podzamcze (Lwow freight
            > railway station) and describes a morning transfer
            > onto a Russian wide-guage boxcar. There is much
            > activity at the station with news going around of at
            > least ten long trains passing through the station
            > filled with people from Lwow.
            >
            > Monday, April 15 at 5am the train finally leaves
            > LWOW. The train passes KRASNE then SKWARZEW. At 8am
            > it is at ZADWORZE. 11am ZLOCZOW. They meet a train
            > packed with people from Jaworow. 12.30 PLUCZKOW. 3pm
            > JEZIERNA. Evening HLUBOCZYK WIELK, TARNOPOL where
            > they meet a train with people deported from
            > Przemysl, Grodek and Chodorow. The train stops for
            > the night at MAKSYMOWKA ( Maksymovka)where it leaves
            > early the next morning.
            >
            > Tuesday, April 16, BOGDANOWK (Bohdanovka) and
            > POWLOCZYSKA(Povlochyska) around 9am ZBRUCZand halts
            > at WOLOCZYSKA(Volochyska). By this time they have
            > been locked up for 2 long days and nights.
            >
            > Wednesday, April 17 the train has been on the move
            > all night and many miles now separate them from
            > Poland. 7am the train stops at ZHMIRINKA. There are
            > trains with people deprted from Przemysl, Chodorow,
            > Podhajec, Rohatyn pulled by "magnificent locomotives
            > that roar steam power." At Zhmirinka they are at
            > last given a bucket of water. WINNICA (Vynnytsa).
            > 6.30pm KALYNIVKA (Koziatyn). During the night the
            > train passes KIEV.
            >
            > Thursday, April 18, YEZHYN, 8am. They still have
            > no idea of where they are going. BERELYZH1pm.
            > DYAKONOVO.
            >
            > Friday, April 19, KURSK They meet trains with
            > deportees from Przemysl, Sadowa, Wisznia and Grodek.
            > And another train from Lwow had just left the
            > station. More trains from Podhajec, Chodorow and
            > Przemysl.
            >
            > Saturday, April 20. PLESHKOV-CHEREMISINOVO.
            > In the morning they pass KALORSK and VORONEZH This
            > is the second week. GRYAZI (Hriasy) A station full
            > of trains. PESKOVATKA. They meet a train from
            > Nadrozna. KOCHETOVKA. After which they are
            > overtaken by a train of people deported from
            > Przemysl and Zimna Woda.
            >
            > Sunday, April 21, SVIZY (Sviazy) 9am. Meet a train
            > from Grodek and Podhajce. After 9 days of travel it
            > is still anybody's guess as to their final
            > destination. BASHMAKOVO, PACHELMA
            >
            > Monday, April 22, KUZNETS. They meet a train from
            > Sokal full of Red Army soldiers. NOVOSPASSKOE.
            > SYZRAN. They arrive in SICZYN (Sichyn) on the Volga.
            > MILANY. The train goes along the Volga " a beautiful
            > wide river." BATRAKY-on-the-Volga.
            >
            > Tuesday, April 23, SAMARA. MARICHEVKA. BUZULUK.
            >
            > Wednesday, April 24 (In Asia) In the night they
            > pass the Ural River. 2pm in ORENBURG.
            > They had passed a train from Lesko and Sambor. 9pm
            > AKBULAK (a journey of "2,200 miles)
            >
            > Thursday, April 25, 8am. AKTYUBINSK, KAZAKH SSR (
            > Soviet Republic of Kazakhstan)
            > The train had arrrived the evening before and is
            > "shunted back and forth" 9am They are unloaded and
            > moved to a "road transport" (truck) At 3.30 pm they
            > are loaded onto trucks. After 2 hours a 45 minute
            > stop at NOVOROSSIISKOYE. In darkness they arrive at
            > Sarsai, where their exile began. They have been
            > confined in the boxcar for 12 and a half days. End
            > of Part one of the diary.
            >
            > Introduction from the Samartian Review
            > Daughter of Kajetan Malachowski and Aleksandra
            > Peplowska, Zofia Ptasnik was born on March 14, 1890,
            > at the family estate of Szczeploty in western
            > Ukraine, a member of the substantial Polish minority
            > in western Ukraine that became part of the Polish
            > state after the Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920 and
            > the Treaty of Riga (1922). In 1925 Zofia married Jan
            > Ptasnik, Professor of History at Jan Kazimierz
            > University, in Lviv (Lwów in Polish) and at the
            > Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He husband died
            > in 1930. They had one son named Mieczyslaw. After
            > her husband's death, Mrs. Ptasnik administered the
            > family estate between 1930-1939.
            > Shortly after the outbreak of World War II on
            > September 1, 1939, and the Soviet invasion of Poland
            > on September 17, Mrs. Ptasnik's sister, Jadwiga
            > (Winia) Malachowska Popiel (Professor Bronislaw
            > Popiel's widow) was arrested and deported to an
            > unknown location in the Soviet northeast where she
            > perished without a trace. Then on April 13, 1940,
            > Zofia Ptasnik was arrested and deported to the
            > Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan where she was forced
            > into slave labor. She died on July 25, 1941 and was
            > buried in the steppe of northern Kazakhstan. A year
            > later, the cross marking her grave gave way to a new
            > railway line. Her Diary covers the period from April
            > 14, 1940 to May 26, 1941.
            >
            > May she be remembered.
            > Regards,
            > Beata
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you
            > with Yahoo Mobile. Try it now.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > removed]
            >
            >



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          • MARIE GAFFNEY
            HI ELZUNIA: I m green with envy - what a TREASURE you have there! Wish I d have been more interested in our past history when I was young and had my Mom and
            Message 5 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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              HI ELZUNIA:

              I'm green with envy - what a TREASURE you have there!
              Wish I'd have been more interested in our past history
              when I was young and had my Mom and Dad there to
              question. What an opportunity I missed!

              BOZENA - Florida, USA

              --- Elizabeth <elzunia@...> wrote:

              > Actually I was just about to mention this (great
              > minds think alike, Antoni!)
              >
              >
              >
              > If you check the Files one the Yahoo site
              >
              >
              > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/>
              > Files >
              >
              <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/Personal_testimonies/>
              > Personal_testimonies > Danuta's Diary
              >
              >
              >
              > You will find my mother's diary, in English and
              > Polish, list of places she
              > travelled through, a route map and other information
              > on her osada.
              >
              >
              >
              > pozdrowienia
              >
              > Elzunia Olsson
              >
              > Sweden
              > Gallery Administrator
              > <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
              > http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html
              >
              >
              >
              > _____
              >
              > From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
              > [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
              > On Behalf Of ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI
              > Sent: Friday, November 23, 2007 6:51 PM
              > To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Train routes
              >
              >
              >
              > Beata,
              > what an interesting historical record;
              > Pani Ptasik was quite alert at the time and had
              > facility to do this; sadly
              > many trains were not opened for a long period of
              > time and it was not
              > possible to know/see the stations properly.
              > One of our member's (Elzunia) Mom also recorded her
              > journey.These are
              > interesting events.
              > antoni530
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >



              ____________________________________________________________________________________
              Get easy, one-click access to your favorites.
              Make Yahoo! your homepage.
              http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
            • Carol Dove
              Beata, Thank you so much for the link. I have wanted to sit and read each link. Not just the train route but there are so many important issues. Thank you
              Message 6 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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                Beata,

                Thank you so much for the link. I have wanted to sit and read each
                link. Not just the train route but there are so many important
                issues. Thank you kindly, Carol Celinska Dove


                --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, Beata Kalinska
                <beatakalinska@...> wrote:
                >
                > Dear Group,
                > Re:train routes. There have been recent discussions of routes
                taken during the deportations, and the wonderful work of some of our
                members in getting the list of trains, translated and into the group
                resouces. While further musing on these I came across the account by
                Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik.
                >
                > Zofia Ptasnik was deported in April 1940 from the family estate
                in Szczeploty in western Ukraine to the Aktyubinsk Region of
                Kazakhstan. She kept a diary on the journey and beyond. The diary
                miraculously survived, has been translated, published in 5 parts in
                the Sarmatian Review and is on the web at:
                >
                > www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia
                >
                > where it can be read in its entirety.
                >
                > For the myself and the group I have extracted below from the
                account all references to PLACES along the route, the time frame,
                with references as well as to other trains that the transport Zofia
                Malachowska Ptasnik was on met along the route. With a good map of
                the territory inferences can be made from this as to the possible
                journeys of our parents and grandparents at this time and on the
                other 3 transport dates.
                >
                > The knock at midnight comes on April 13.
                >
                > Sunday, April 14, 1940 at 7am she joins others at JAWOROW. People
                are also being brought here from Niemirow and the train waits the
                entire day as new people are brought from the town of Jaworow itself
                and the surrounding villages. There are two women from Ulicko.
                (Jaworow, I looked up, is 30 miles west of Lwow)
                >
                > The train consists of 40 cars, each boxcar containing 30 people.
                >
                > She is writing from Podzamcze (Lwow freight railway station) and
                describes a morning transfer onto a Russian wide-guage boxcar. There
                is much activity at the station with news going around of at least
                ten long trains passing through the station filled with people from
                Lwow.
                >
                > Monday, April 15 at 5am the train finally leaves LWOW. The train
                passes KRASNE then SKWARZEW. At 8am it is at ZADWORZE. 11am ZLOCZOW.
                They meet a train packed with people from Jaworow. 12.30 PLUCZKOW.
                3pm JEZIERNA. Evening HLUBOCZYK WIELK, TARNOPOL where they meet a
                train with people deported from Przemysl, Grodek and Chodorow. The
                train stops for the night at MAKSYMOWKA ( Maksymovka)where it leaves
                early the next morning.
                >
                > Tuesday, April 16, BOGDANOWK (Bohdanovka) and POWLOCZYSKA
                (Povlochyska) around 9am ZBRUCZand halts at WOLOCZYSKA(Volochyska).
                By this time they have been locked up for 2 long days and nights.
                >
                > Wednesday, April 17 the train has been on the move all night and
                many miles now separate them from Poland. 7am the train stops at
                ZHMIRINKA. There are trains with people deprted from Przemysl,
                Chodorow, Podhajec, Rohatyn pulled by "magnificent locomotives that
                roar steam power." At Zhmirinka they are at last given a bucket of
                water. WINNICA (Vynnytsa). 6.30pm KALYNIVKA (Koziatyn). During the
                night the train passes KIEV.
                >
                > Thursday, April 18, YEZHYN, 8am. They still have no idea of where
                they are going. BERELYZH1pm. DYAKONOVO.
                >
                > Friday, April 19, KURSK They meet trains with deportees from
                Przemysl, Sadowa, Wisznia and Grodek. And another train from Lwow had
                just left the station. More trains from Podhajec, Chodorow and
                Przemysl.
                >
                > Saturday, April 20. PLESHKOV-CHEREMISINOVO.
                > In the morning they pass KALORSK and VORONEZH This is the second
                week. GRYAZI (Hriasy) A station full of trains. PESKOVATKA. They meet
                a train from Nadrozna. KOCHETOVKA. After which they are overtaken by
                a train of people deported from Przemysl and Zimna Woda.
                >
                > Sunday, April 21, SVIZY (Sviazy) 9am. Meet a train from Grodek
                and Podhajce. After 9 days of travel it is still anybody's guess as
                to their final destination. BASHMAKOVO, PACHELMA
                >
                > Monday, April 22, KUZNETS. They meet a train from Sokal full of
                Red Army soldiers. NOVOSPASSKOE. SYZRAN. They arrive in SICZYN
                (Sichyn) on the Volga. MILANY. The train goes along the Volga " a
                beautiful wide river." BATRAKY-on-the-Volga.
                >
                > Tuesday, April 23, SAMARA. MARICHEVKA. BUZULUK.
                >
                > Wednesday, April 24 (In Asia) In the night they pass the Ural
                River. 2pm in ORENBURG.
                > They had passed a train from Lesko and Sambor. 9pm AKBULAK (a
                journey of "2,200 miles)
                >
                > Thursday, April 25, 8am. AKTYUBINSK, KAZAKH SSR ( Soviet Republic
                of Kazakhstan)
                > The train had arrrived the evening before and is "shunted back
                and forth" 9am They are unloaded and moved to a "road transport"
                (truck) At 3.30 pm they are loaded onto trucks. After 2 hours a 45
                minute stop at NOVOROSSIISKOYE. In darkness they arrive at Sarsai,
                where their exile began. They have been confined in the boxcar for 12
                and a half days. End of Part one of the diary.
                >
                > Introduction from the Samartian Review
                > Daughter of Kajetan Malachowski and Aleksandra Peplowska, Zofia
                Ptasnik was born on March 14, 1890, at the family estate of
                Szczeploty in western Ukraine, a member of the substantial Polish
                minority in western Ukraine that became part of the Polish state
                after the Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920 and the Treaty of Riga
                (1922). In 1925 Zofia married Jan Ptasnik, Professor of History at
                Jan Kazimierz University, in Lviv (Lwów in Polish) and at the
                Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He husband died in 1930. They had
                one son named Mieczyslaw. After her husband's death, Mrs. Ptasnik
                administered the family estate between 1930-1939.
                > Shortly after the outbreak of World War II on September 1, 1939,
                and the Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, Mrs. Ptasnik's
                sister, Jadwiga (Winia) Malachowska Popiel (Professor Bronislaw
                Popiel's widow) was arrested and deported to an unknown location in
                the Soviet northeast where she perished without a trace. Then on
                April 13, 1940, Zofia Ptasnik was arrested and deported to the
                Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan where she was forced into slave
                labor. She died on July 25, 1941 and was buried in the steppe of
                northern Kazakhstan. A year later, the cross marking her grave gave
                way to a new railway line. Her Diary covers the period from April 14,
                1940 to May 26, 1941.
                >
                > May she be remembered.
                > Regards,
                > Beata
                >
                >
                > ---------------------------------
                > Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo
                Mobile. Try it now.
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Krystyna Styrna-Buyukpinar
                Hi Bozena; I wish I knew of that route to share with you..but I do know a lady by the name of Janina Ptak. I wonder if they are one and the same? You may
                Message 7 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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                  Hi Bozena;
                  I wish I knew of that route to share with you..but I do know a lady by the name of Janina Ptak. I wonder if they are one and the same? You may contact me privately if you wish.
                  Pozdrawiam Krystyna

                  MARIE GAFFNEY <tinijoroga@...> wrote:
                  HI BEATA and GROUP:

                  How wonderful it must be to know the route taken. I
                  have not been able to find the one that left Sarny
                  (deportation date of 2/10/40) arriving in "Szabryca"
                  (closest spelling to the name I heard from my Mother
                  and my adopted Aunt, Janina Ptak). All I know is that
                  the journey itself took five weeks. When we left that
                  train station, they put my Mom and me (five months
                  old) on a sleigh and my Father walked alongside,
                  arriving in Darovatka posiolek.

                  If anyone has any information on that particular
                  route, PLEASE, PLEASE advise!!! Thank you!!!

                  BOZENA - Florida, USA

                  --- Beata Kalinska <beatakalinska@...> wrote:

                  > Dear Group,
                  > Re:train routes. There have been recent
                  > discussions of routes taken during the deportations,
                  > and the wonderful work of some of our members in
                  > getting the list of trains, translated and into the
                  > group resouces. While further musing on these I came
                  > across the account by Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik.
                  >
                  > Zofia Ptasnik was deported in April 1940 from the
                  > family estate in Szczeploty in western Ukraine to
                  > the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan. She kept a
                  > diary on the journey and beyond. The diary
                  > miraculously survived, has been translated,
                  > published in 5 parts in the Sarmatian Review and is
                  > on the web at:
                  >
                  > www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia
                  >
                  > where it can be read in its entirety.
                  >
                  > For the myself and the group I have extracted
                  > below from the account all references to PLACES
                  > along the route, the time frame, with references as
                  > well as to other trains that the transport Zofia
                  > Malachowska Ptasnik was on met along the route. With
                  > a good map of the territory inferences can be made
                  > from this as to the possible journeys of our parents
                  > and grandparents at this time and on the other 3
                  > transport dates.
                  >
                  > The knock at midnight comes on April 13.
                  >
                  > Sunday, April 14, 1940 at 7am she joins others at
                  > JAWOROW. People are also being brought here from
                  > Niemirow and the train waits the entire day as new
                  > people are brought from the town of Jaworow itself
                  > and the surrounding villages. There are two women
                  > from Ulicko. (Jaworow, I looked up, is 30 miles west
                  > of Lwow)
                  >
                  > The train consists of 40 cars, each boxcar
                  > containing 30 people.
                  >
                  > She is writing from Podzamcze (Lwow freight
                  > railway station) and describes a morning transfer
                  > onto a Russian wide-guage boxcar. There is much
                  > activity at the station with news going around of at
                  > least ten long trains passing through the station
                  > filled with people from Lwow.
                  >
                  > Monday, April 15 at 5am the train finally leaves
                  > LWOW. The train passes KRASNE then SKWARZEW. At 8am
                  > it is at ZADWORZE. 11am ZLOCZOW. They meet a train
                  > packed with people from Jaworow. 12.30 PLUCZKOW. 3pm
                  > JEZIERNA. Evening HLUBOCZYK WIELK, TARNOPOL where
                  > they meet a train with people deported from
                  > Przemysl, Grodek and Chodorow. The train stops for
                  > the night at MAKSYMOWKA ( Maksymovka)where it leaves
                  > early the next morning.
                  >
                  > Tuesday, April 16, BOGDANOWK (Bohdanovka) and
                  > POWLOCZYSKA(Povlochyska) around 9am ZBRUCZand halts
                  > at WOLOCZYSKA(Volochyska). By this time they have
                  > been locked up for 2 long days and nights.
                  >
                  > Wednesday, April 17 the train has been on the move
                  > all night and many miles now separate them from
                  > Poland. 7am the train stops at ZHMIRINKA. There are
                  > trains with people deprted from Przemysl, Chodorow,
                  > Podhajec, Rohatyn pulled by "magnificent locomotives
                  > that roar steam power." At Zhmirinka they are at
                  > last given a bucket of water. WINNICA (Vynnytsa).
                  > 6.30pm KALYNIVKA (Koziatyn). During the night the
                  > train passes KIEV.
                  >
                  > Thursday, April 18, YEZHYN, 8am. They still have
                  > no idea of where they are going. BERELYZH1pm.
                  > DYAKONOVO.
                  >
                  > Friday, April 19, KURSK They meet trains with
                  > deportees from Przemysl, Sadowa, Wisznia and Grodek.
                  > And another train from Lwow had just left the
                  > station. More trains from Podhajec, Chodorow and
                  > Przemysl.
                  >
                  > Saturday, April 20. PLESHKOV-CHEREMISINOVO.
                  > In the morning they pass KALORSK and VORONEZH This
                  > is the second week. GRYAZI (Hriasy) A station full
                  > of trains. PESKOVATKA. They meet a train from
                  > Nadrozna. KOCHETOVKA. After which they are
                  > overtaken by a train of people deported from
                  > Przemysl and Zimna Woda.
                  >
                  > Sunday, April 21, SVIZY (Sviazy) 9am. Meet a train
                  > from Grodek and Podhajce. After 9 days of travel it
                  > is still anybody's guess as to their final
                  > destination. BASHMAKOVO, PACHELMA
                  >
                  > Monday, April 22, KUZNETS. They meet a train from
                  > Sokal full of Red Army soldiers. NOVOSPASSKOE.
                  > SYZRAN. They arrive in SICZYN (Sichyn) on the Volga.
                  > MILANY. The train goes along the Volga " a beautiful
                  > wide river." BATRAKY-on-the-Volga.
                  >
                  > Tuesday, April 23, SAMARA. MARICHEVKA. BUZULUK.
                  >
                  > Wednesday, April 24 (In Asia) In the night they
                  > pass the Ural River. 2pm in ORENBURG.
                  > They had passed a train from Lesko and Sambor. 9pm
                  > AKBULAK (a journey of "2,200 miles)
                  >
                  > Thursday, April 25, 8am. AKTYUBINSK, KAZAKH SSR (
                  > Soviet Republic of Kazakhstan)
                  > The train had arrrived the evening before and is
                  > "shunted back and forth" 9am They are unloaded and
                  > moved to a "road transport" (truck) At 3.30 pm they
                  > are loaded onto trucks. After 2 hours a 45 minute
                  > stop at NOVOROSSIISKOYE. In darkness they arrive at
                  > Sarsai, where their exile began. They have been
                  > confined in the boxcar for 12 and a half days. End
                  > of Part one of the diary.
                  >
                  > Introduction from the Samartian Review
                  > Daughter of Kajetan Malachowski and Aleksandra
                  > Peplowska, Zofia Ptasnik was born on March 14, 1890,
                  > at the family estate of Szczeploty in western
                  > Ukraine, a member of the substantial Polish minority
                  > in western Ukraine that became part of the Polish
                  > state after the Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920 and
                  > the Treaty of Riga (1922). In 1925 Zofia married Jan
                  > Ptasnik, Professor of History at Jan Kazimierz
                  > University, in Lviv (Lwów in Polish) and at the
                  > Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He husband died
                  > in 1930. They had one son named Mieczyslaw. After
                  > her husband's death, Mrs. Ptasnik administered the
                  > family estate between 1930-1939.
                  > Shortly after the outbreak of World War II on
                  > September 1, 1939, and the Soviet invasion of Poland
                  > on September 17, Mrs. Ptasnik's sister, Jadwiga
                  > (Winia) Malachowska Popiel (Professor Bronislaw
                  > Popiel's widow) was arrested and deported to an
                  > unknown location in the Soviet northeast where she
                  > perished without a trace. Then on April 13, 1940,
                  > Zofia Ptasnik was arrested and deported to the
                  > Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan where she was forced
                  > into slave labor. She died on July 25, 1941 and was
                  > buried in the steppe of northern Kazakhstan. A year
                  > later, the cross marking her grave gave way to a new
                  > railway line. Her Diary covers the period from April
                  > 14, 1940 to May 26, 1941.
                  >
                  > May she be remembered.
                  > Regards,
                  > Beata
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you
                  > with Yahoo Mobile. Try it now.
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                  > removed]
                  >
                  >

                  __________________________________________________________
                  Be a better pen pal.
                  Text or chat with friends inside Yahoo! Mail. See how. http://overview.mail.yahoo.com/





                  Dziekuje i pozdrawiam Krystyna Styrna-Buyukpinar

                  ---------------------------------
                  Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo Mobile. Try it now.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Krystyna Styrna-Buyukpinar
                  Carol Dove wrote: Beata, Thank you so much for the link. I have wanted to sit and read each link. Not just the train route but
                  Message 8 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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                    Carol Dove <stashaok@...> wrote: Beata,

                    Thank you so much for the link. I have wanted to sit and read each
                    link. Not just the train route but there are so many important
                    issues. Thank you kindly, Carol Celinska Dove

                    --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, Beata Kalinska
                    <beatakalinska@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Group,
                    > Re:train routes. There have been recent discussions of routes
                    taken during the deportations, and the wonderful work of some of our
                    members in getting the list of trains, translated and into the group
                    resouces. While further musing on these I came across the account by
                    Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik.
                    >
                    > Zofia Ptasnik was deported in April 1940 from the family estate
                    in Szczeploty in western Ukraine to the Aktyubinsk Region of
                    Kazakhstan. She kept a diary on the journey and beyond. The diary
                    miraculously survived, has been translated, published in 5 parts in
                    the Sarmatian Review and is on the web at:
                    >
                    > www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia
                    >
                    > where it can be read in its entirety.
                    >
                    > For the myself and the group I have extracted below from the
                    account all references to PLACES along the route, the time frame,
                    with references as well as to other trains that the transport Zofia
                    Malachowska Ptasnik was on met along the route. With a good map of
                    the territory inferences can be made from this as to the possible
                    journeys of our parents and grandparents at this time and on the
                    other 3 transport dates.
                    >
                    > The knock at midnight comes on April 13.
                    >
                    > Sunday, April 14, 1940 at 7am she joins others at JAWOROW. People
                    are also being brought here from Niemirow and the train waits the
                    entire day as new people are brought from the town of Jaworow itself
                    and the surrounding villages. There are two women from Ulicko.
                    (Jaworow, I looked up, is 30 miles west of Lwow)
                    >
                    > The train consists of 40 cars, each boxcar containing 30 people.
                    >
                    > She is writing from Podzamcze (Lwow freight railway station) and
                    describes a morning transfer onto a Russian wide-guage boxcar. There
                    is much activity at the station with news going around of at least
                    ten long trains passing through the station filled with people from
                    Lwow.
                    >
                    > Monday, April 15 at 5am the train finally leaves LWOW. The train
                    passes KRASNE then SKWARZEW. At 8am it is at ZADWORZE. 11am ZLOCZOW.
                    They meet a train packed with people from Jaworow. 12.30 PLUCZKOW.
                    3pm JEZIERNA. Evening HLUBOCZYK WIELK, TARNOPOL where they meet a
                    train with people deported from Przemysl, Grodek and Chodorow. The
                    train stops for the night at MAKSYMOWKA ( Maksymovka)where it leaves
                    early the next morning.
                    >
                    > Tuesday, April 16, BOGDANOWK (Bohdanovka) and POWLOCZYSKA
                    (Povlochyska) around 9am ZBRUCZand halts at WOLOCZYSKA(Volochyska).
                    By this time they have been locked up for 2 long days and nights.
                    >
                    > Wednesday, April 17 the train has been on the move all night and
                    many miles now separate them from Poland. 7am the train stops at
                    ZHMIRINKA. There are trains with people deprted from Przemysl,
                    Chodorow, Podhajec, Rohatyn pulled by "magnificent locomotives that
                    roar steam power." At Zhmirinka they are at last given a bucket of
                    water. WINNICA (Vynnytsa). 6.30pm KALYNIVKA (Koziatyn). During the
                    night the train passes KIEV.
                    >
                    > Thursday, April 18, YEZHYN, 8am. They still have no idea of where
                    they are going. BERELYZH1pm. DYAKONOVO.
                    >
                    > Friday, April 19, KURSK They meet trains with deportees from
                    Przemysl, Sadowa, Wisznia and Grodek. And another train from Lwow had
                    just left the station. More trains from Podhajec, Chodorow and
                    Przemysl.
                    >
                    > Saturday, April 20. PLESHKOV-CHEREMISINOVO.
                    > In the morning they pass KALORSK and VORONEZH This is the second
                    week. GRYAZI (Hriasy) A station full of trains. PESKOVATKA. They meet
                    a train from Nadrozna. KOCHETOVKA. After which they are overtaken by
                    a train of people deported from Przemysl and Zimna Woda.
                    >
                    > Sunday, April 21, SVIZY (Sviazy) 9am. Meet a train from Grodek
                    and Podhajce. After 9 days of travel it is still anybody's guess as
                    to their final destination. BASHMAKOVO, PACHELMA
                    >
                    > Monday, April 22, KUZNETS. They meet a train from Sokal full of
                    Red Army soldiers. NOVOSPASSKOE. SYZRAN. They arrive in SICZYN
                    (Sichyn) on the Volga. MILANY. The train goes along the Volga " a
                    beautiful wide river." BATRAKY-on-the-Volga.
                    >
                    > Tuesday, April 23, SAMARA. MARICHEVKA. BUZULUK.
                    >
                    > Wednesday, April 24 (In Asia) In the night they pass the Ural
                    River. 2pm in ORENBURG.
                    > They had passed a train from Lesko and Sambor. 9pm AKBULAK (a
                    journey of "2,200 miles)
                    >
                    > Thursday, April 25, 8am. AKTYUBINSK, KAZAKH SSR ( Soviet Republic
                    of Kazakhstan)
                    > The train had arrrived the evening before and is "shunted back
                    and forth" 9am They are unloaded and moved to a "road transport"
                    (truck) At 3.30 pm they are loaded onto trucks. After 2 hours a 45
                    minute stop at NOVOROSSIISKOYE. In darkness they arrive at Sarsai,
                    where their exile began. They have been confined in the boxcar for 12
                    and a half days. End of Part one of the diary.
                    >
                    > Introduction from the Samartian Review
                    > Daughter of Kajetan Malachowski and Aleksandra Peplowska, Zofia
                    Ptasnik was born on March 14, 1890, at the family estate of
                    Szczeploty in western Ukraine, a member of the substantial Polish
                    minority in western Ukraine that became part of the Polish state
                    after the Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920 and the Treaty of Riga
                    (1922). In 1925 Zofia married Jan Ptasnik, Professor of History at
                    Jan Kazimierz University, in Lviv (Lwów in Polish) and at the
                    Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He husband died in 1930. They had
                    one son named Mieczyslaw. After her husband's death, Mrs. Ptasnik
                    administered the family estate between 1930-1939.
                    > Shortly after the outbreak of World War II on September 1, 1939,
                    and the Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, Mrs. Ptasnik's
                    sister, Jadwiga (Winia) Malachowska Popiel (Professor Bronislaw
                    Popiel's widow) was arrested and deported to an unknown location in
                    the Soviet northeast where she perished without a trace. Then on
                    April 13, 1940, Zofia Ptasnik was arrested and deported to the
                    Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan where she was forced into slave
                    labor. She died on July 25, 1941 and was buried in the steppe of
                    northern Kazakhstan. A year later, the cross marking her grave gave
                    way to a new railway line. Her Diary covers the period from April 14,
                    1940 to May 26, 1941.
                    >
                    > May she be remembered.
                    > Regards,
                    > Beata
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo
                    Mobile. Try it now.
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >






                    Dziekuje i pozdrawiam Krystyna Styrna-Buyukpinar

                    ---------------------------------
                    Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo Mobile. Try it now.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Elizabeth
                    I was like everybody else when I was young - fed up of hearing about the war! In one ear and out the other!! So I can t take any credit for any of this
                    Message 9 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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                      I was like everybody else when I was young - fed up of hearing about the
                      war! In one ear and out the other!!

                      So I can't take any credit for any of this material - I'm lucky that my
                      parents have both documented their experiences and written diaries, articles
                      and books etc. And my Mum is still alive to answer my questions.



                      Several members of my family have just come back from New York to see the
                      exhibition of our family memorabilia at the Polish American Museum

                      http://gallery.kresy-siberia.org/Elzunia-Olsson?
                      <http://gallery.kresy-siberia.org/Elzunia-Olsson?&page=2> &page=2



                      Gerald Kochan (who bought the memorabilia) made good his promise - the
                      exhibit is very impressive, as is the whole museum. Well worth a visit, I am
                      told. A modern, spacious building with lots of rooms dedicated to various
                      aspects of being a second generation Pole who does not read or understand
                      much Polish. Almost everything was in English and covered subjects like
                      music, art & culture, literature, Nobel Prize winners, all in separate
                      rooms. More photos to come.



                      pozdrowienia

                      Elzunia Olsson

                      Sweden
                      Gallery Administrator
                      <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                      http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html



                      _____

                      From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
                      On Behalf Of MARIE GAFFNEY
                      Sent: Friday, November 23, 2007 7:27 PM
                      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Train routes



                      HI ELZUNIA:

                      I'm green with envy - what a TREASURE you have there!
                      Wish I'd have been more interested in our past history
                      when I was young and had my Mom and Dad there to
                      question. What an opportunity I missed!

                      BOZENA - Florida, USA

                      --- Elizabeth <elzunia@alimail. <mailto:elzunia%40alimail.net> net> wrote:

                      > Actually I was just about to mention this (great
                      > minds think alike, Antoni!)
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > If you check the Files one the Yahoo site
                      >
                      >
                      > <http://groups. <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/>
                      yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/>
                      > Files >
                      >
                      <http://groups.
                      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/Personal_testimonies/>
                      yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/Personal_testimonies/>
                      > Personal_testimonies > Danuta's Diary
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > You will find my mother's diary, in English and
                      > Polish, list of places she
                      > travelled through, a route map and other information
                      > on her osada.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > pozdrowienia
                      >
                      > Elzunia Olsson
                      >
                      > Sweden
                      > Gallery Administrator
                      > <http://www.kresy- <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                      siberia.org/photo.html>
                      > http://www.kresy- <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                      siberia.org/photo.html
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > _____
                      >
                      > From: Kresy-Siberia@ <mailto:Kresy-Siberia%40yahoogroups.com>
                      yahoogroups.com
                      > [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@ <mailto:Kresy-Siberia%40yahoogroups.com>
                      yahoogroups.com]
                      > On Behalf Of ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI
                      > Sent: Friday, November 23, 2007 6:51 PM
                      > To: Kresy-Siberia@ <mailto:Kresy-Siberia%40yahoogroups.com>
                      yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Train routes
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Beata,
                      > what an interesting historical record;
                      > Pani Ptasik was quite alert at the time and had
                      > facility to do this; sadly
                      > many trains were not opened for a long period of
                      > time and it was not
                      > possible to know/see the stations properly.
                      > One of our member's (Elzunia) Mom also recorded her
                      > journey.These are
                      > interesting events.
                      > antoni530
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                      > removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                      > removed]
                      >
                      >

                      __________________________________________________________
                      Get easy, one-click access to your favorites.
                      Make Yahoo! your homepage.
                      http://www.yahoo. <http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs> com/r/hs





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • concernedconnecticutresident
                      Elzunia: I took a look at the pictures of the exhibit of your Mom and Dad in New York. It s wonderful and you must be so proud. Hopefully, I ll be able to
                      Message 10 of 24 , Nov 23, 2007
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                        Elzunia:

                        I took a look at the pictures of the exhibit of your Mom and Dad in
                        New York. It's wonderful and you must be so proud. Hopefully, I'll
                        be able to see it in person one of these days. Did I see that it is
                        going to be there from this October until October 2008? Where is it
                        going after that? Is it a travelling exhibit?

                        If that's the case, maybe we can talk about bringing it to
                        Connecticut, as next October is a possible date for an "On Eagle's
                        Wings" or something similar here. Carol and I have been discussing
                        it. I'm hoping to hook up with Professor Biskupski, head of Slavic
                        Studies from Central Connecticut State University, as next October he
                        is speaking to a Polish genealogy group about Polish History. I'm
                        planning on asking him if we can do our thing in conjunction with his
                        planned speech. He led a showing of AFO a few years ago at the
                        college when the Anders Exhibit was there, so I think and hope he'll
                        be interested. Vyto's son is working on his Master's degree at
                        Central in history I believe, so I think I'll have a connection.

                        I hope my plan works. Wish me luck.

                        Barb Revoet
                        Connecticut, USA



                        --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "Elizabeth" <elzunia@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I was like everybody else when I was young - fed up of hearing
                        about the
                        > war! In one ear and out the other!!
                        >
                        > So I can't take any credit for any of this material - I'm lucky
                        that my
                        > parents have both documented their experiences and written diaries,
                        articles
                        > and books etc. And my Mum is still alive to answer my questions.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Several members of my family have just come back from New York to
                        see the
                        > exhibition of our family memorabilia at the Polish American Museum
                        >
                        > http://gallery.kresy-siberia.org/Elzunia-Olsson?
                        > <http://gallery.kresy-siberia.org/Elzunia-Olsson?&page=2> &page=2
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Gerald Kochan (who bought the memorabilia) made good his promise -
                        the
                        > exhibit is very impressive, as is the whole museum. Well worth a
                        visit, I am
                        > told. A modern, spacious building with lots of rooms dedicated to
                        various
                        > aspects of being a second generation Pole who does not read or
                        understand
                        > much Polish. Almost everything was in English and covered subjects
                        like
                        > music, art & culture, literature, Nobel Prize winners, all in
                        separate
                        > rooms. More photos to come.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > pozdrowienia
                        >
                        > Elzunia Olsson
                        >
                        > Sweden
                        > Gallery Administrator
                        > <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                        > http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > _____
                        >
                        > From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-
                        Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
                        > On Behalf Of MARIE GAFFNEY
                        > Sent: Friday, November 23, 2007 7:27 PM
                        > To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Train routes
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > HI ELZUNIA:
                        >
                        > I'm green with envy - what a TREASURE you have there!
                        > Wish I'd have been more interested in our past history
                        > when I was young and had my Mom and Dad there to
                        > question. What an opportunity I missed!
                        >
                        > BOZENA - Florida, USA
                        >
                        > --- Elizabeth <elzunia@alimail. <mailto:elzunia%40alimail.net> net>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > > Actually I was just about to mention this (great
                        > > minds think alike, Antoni!)
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > If you check the Files one the Yahoo site
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > <http://groups. <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-
                        Siberia/files/>
                        > yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/>
                        > > Files >
                        > >
                        > <http://groups.
                        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Kresy-
                        Siberia/files/Personal_testimonies/>
                        > yahoo.com/group/Kresy-Siberia/files/Personal_testimonies/>
                        > > Personal_testimonies > Danuta's Diary
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > You will find my mother's diary, in English and
                        > > Polish, list of places she
                        > > travelled through, a route map and other information
                        > > on her osada.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > pozdrowienia
                        > >
                        > > Elzunia Olsson
                        > >
                        > > Sweden
                        > > Gallery Administrator
                        > > <http://www.kresy- <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                        > siberia.org/photo.html>
                        > > http://www.kresy- <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                        > siberia.org/photo.html
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > _____
                        > >
                        > > From: Kresy-Siberia@ <mailto:Kresy-Siberia%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > yahoogroups.com
                        > > [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@ <mailto:Kresy-Siberia%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > yahoogroups.com]
                        > > On Behalf Of ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI
                        > > Sent: Friday, November 23, 2007 6:51 PM
                        > > To: Kresy-Siberia@ <mailto:Kresy-Siberia%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > yahoogroups.com
                        > > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Train routes
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Beata,
                        > > what an interesting historical record;
                        > > Pani Ptasik was quite alert at the time and had
                        > > facility to do this; sadly
                        > > many trains were not opened for a long period of
                        > > time and it was not
                        > > possible to know/see the stations properly.
                        > > One of our member's (Elzunia) Mom also recorded her
                        > > journey.These are
                        > > interesting events.
                        > > antoni530
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                        > > removed]
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                        > > removed]
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > __________________________________________________________
                        > Get easy, one-click access to your favorites.
                        > Make Yahoo! your homepage.
                        > http://www.yahoo. <http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs> com/r/hs
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • Carol Dove
                        Beata, I am still reading through the archives and wanted to ask you, can we send this on to others to help educate. I noticed alot of the stories in the
                        Message 11 of 24 , Nov 24, 2007
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                          Beata,

                          I am still reading through the archives and wanted to ask you, can we send this on to others to help educate. I noticed alot of the stories in the Sarmatia come from information obtained at Hoover inst.., not so much by the family but more by writers. Is this becoming more popular where writers are seaching out our family information to write books? This story below was just being discussed in here about the 1939-44 murders in eastern Poland. For the ones that need this info I found it in archive I believe it was April.

                          Thank you for the great link Beata, Carol Celinska Dove
                          “Neither Twenty Million, nor Russians, nor War Dead . ..” by Norman Davies
                          Beata Kalinska <beatakalinska@...> wrote:
                          Dear Group,
                          Re:train routes. There have been recent discussions of routes taken during the deportations, and the wonderful work of some of our members in getting the list of trains, translated and into the group resouces. While further musing on these I came across the account by Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik.

                          Zofia Ptasnik was deported in April 1940 from the family estate in Szczeploty in western Ukraine to the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan. She kept a diary on the journey and beyond. The diary miraculously survived, has been translated, published in 5 parts in the Sarmatian Review and is on the web at:

                          www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia

                          where it can be read in its entirety.

                          For the myself and the group I have extracted below from the account all references to PLACES along the route, the time frame, with references as well as to other trains that the transport Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik was on met along the route. With a good map of the territory inferences can be made from this as to the possible journeys of our parents and grandparents at this time and on the other 3 transport dates.

                          The knock at midnight comes on April 13.

                          Sunday, April 14, 1940 at 7am she joins others at JAWOROW. People are also being brought here from Niemirow and the train waits the entire day as new people are brought from the town of Jaworow itself and the surrounding villages. There are two women from Ulicko. (Jaworow, I looked up, is 30 miles west of Lwow)

                          The train consists of 40 cars, each boxcar containing 30 people.

                          She is writing from Podzamcze (Lwow freight railway station) and describes a morning transfer onto a Russian wide-guage boxcar. There is much activity at the station with news going around of at least ten long trains passing through the station filled with people from Lwow.

                          Monday, April 15 at 5am the train finally leaves LWOW. The train passes KRASNE then SKWARZEW. At 8am it is at ZADWORZE. 11am ZLOCZOW. They meet a train packed with people from Jaworow. 12.30 PLUCZKOW. 3pm JEZIERNA. Evening HLUBOCZYK WIELK, TARNOPOL where they meet a train with people deported from Przemysl, Grodek and Chodorow. The train stops for the night at MAKSYMOWKA ( Maksymovka)where it leaves early the next morning.

                          Tuesday, April 16, BOGDANOWK (Bohdanovka) and POWLOCZYSKA(Povlochyska) around 9am ZBRUCZand halts at WOLOCZYSKA(Volochyska). By this time they have been locked up for 2 long days and nights.

                          Wednesday, April 17 the train has been on the move all night and many miles now separate them from Poland. 7am the train stops at ZHMIRINKA. There are trains with people deprted from Przemysl, Chodorow, Podhajec, Rohatyn pulled by "magnificent locomotives that roar steam power." At Zhmirinka they are at last given a bucket of water. WINNICA (Vynnytsa). 6.30pm KALYNIVKA (Koziatyn). During the night the train passes KIEV.

                          Thursday, April 18, YEZHYN, 8am. They still have no idea of where they are going. BERELYZH1pm. DYAKONOVO.

                          Friday, April 19, KURSK They meet trains with deportees from Przemysl, Sadowa, Wisznia and Grodek. And another train from Lwow had just left the station. More trains from Podhajec, Chodorow and Przemysl.

                          Saturday, April 20. PLESHKOV-CHEREMISINOVO.
                          In the morning they pass KALORSK and VORONEZH This is the second week. GRYAZI (Hriasy) A station full of trains. PESKOVATKA. They meet a train from Nadrozna. KOCHETOVKA. After which they are overtaken by a train of people deported from Przemysl and Zimna Woda.

                          Sunday, April 21, SVIZY (Sviazy) 9am. Meet a train from Grodek and Podhajce. After 9 days of travel it is still anybody's guess as to their final destination. BASHMAKOVO, PACHELMA

                          Monday, April 22, KUZNETS. They meet a train from Sokal full of Red Army soldiers. NOVOSPASSKOE. SYZRAN. They arrive in SICZYN (Sichyn) on the Volga. MILANY. The train goes along the Volga " a beautiful wide river." BATRAKY-on-the-Volga.

                          Tuesday, April 23, SAMARA. MARICHEVKA. BUZULUK.

                          Wednesday, April 24 (In Asia) In the night they pass the Ural River. 2pm in ORENBURG.
                          They had passed a train from Lesko and Sambor. 9pm AKBULAK (a journey of "2,200 miles)

                          Thursday, April 25, 8am. AKTYUBINSK, KAZAKH SSR ( Soviet Republic of Kazakhstan)
                          The train had arrrived the evening before and is "shunted back and forth" 9am They are unloaded and moved to a "road transport" (truck) At 3.30 pm they are loaded onto trucks. After 2 hours a 45 minute stop at NOVOROSSIISKOYE. In darkness they arrive at Sarsai, where their exile began. They have been confined in the boxcar for 12 and a half days. End of Part one of the diary.

                          Introduction from the Samartian Review
                          Daughter of Kajetan Malachowski and Aleksandra Peplowska, Zofia Ptasnik was born on March 14, 1890, at the family estate of Szczeploty in western Ukraine, a member of the substantial Polish minority in western Ukraine that became part of the Polish state after the Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920 and the Treaty of Riga (1922). In 1925 Zofia married Jan Ptasnik, Professor of History at Jan Kazimierz University, in Lviv (Lwów in Polish) and at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He husband died in 1930. They had one son named Mieczyslaw. After her husband's death, Mrs. Ptasnik administered the family estate between 1930-1939.
                          Shortly after the outbreak of World War II on September 1, 1939, and the Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, Mrs. Ptasnik's sister, Jadwiga (Winia) Malachowska Popiel (Professor Bronislaw Popiel's widow) was arrested and deported to an unknown location in the Soviet northeast where she perished without a trace. Then on April 13, 1940, Zofia Ptasnik was arrested and deported to the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan where she was forced into slave labor. She died on July 25, 1941 and was buried in the steppe of northern Kazakhstan. A year later, the cross marking her grave gave way to a new railway line. Her Diary covers the period from April 14, 1940 to May 26, 1941.

                          May she be remembered.
                          Regards,
                          Beata

                          ---------------------------------
                          Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo Mobile. Try it now.

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                          ---------------------------------
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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Carol Dove
                          Group, I wanted to let you know about this free site that I find helpful to stop in and ask questions. You can add your family name and see if you get a
                          Message 12 of 24 , Nov 24, 2007
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                            Group,

                            I wanted to let you know about this free site that I find helpful to stop in and ask questions. You can add your family name and see if you get a reply, check out travel tips or ask people from the town you are researching what it's like today. There are many subject matters and it helps to just drop in from time to time and educate in this forum as well as learn what the world is saying.

                            Carol Celinska Dove


                            Polishforums.com



                            ---------------------------------
                            Be a better pen pal. Text or chat with friends inside Yahoo! Mail. See how.

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Eduard Wojciulewicz
                            I saw the name Malachowski. This is the page of Kaj Malachowski from Warszawa. He is a good historian and researcher, and specialist in genealogy and heraldry
                            Message 13 of 24 , Nov 24, 2007
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                              I saw the name Malachowski.
                              This is the page of Kaj Malachowski from Warszawa. He is a good historian
                              and researcher, and specialist in genealogy and heraldry :
                              http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/2739/
                              e-mail : malachowo@...
                              Family?
                              Eduard

                              -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
                              Van: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                              [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]Namens Carol Dove
                              Verzonden: zaterdag 24 november 2007 16:44
                              Aan: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com; kresy-siberia@yahoogroups.com
                              Onderwerp: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Sarmatia archives

                              Beata,

                              I am still reading through the archives and wanted to ask you, can we send
                              this on to others to help educate. I noticed alot of the stories in the
                              Sarmatia come from information obtained at Hoover inst.., not so much by the
                              family but more by writers. Is this becoming more popular where writers are
                              seaching out our family information to write books? This story below was
                              just being discussed in here about the 1939-44 murders in eastern Poland.
                              For the ones that need this info I found it in archive I believe it was
                              April.

                              Thank you for the great link Beata, Carol Celinska Dove
                              “Neither Twenty Million, nor Russians, nor War Dead . ..” by Norman Davies
                              Beata Kalinska < beatakalinska@... <mailto:beatakalinska%40yahoo.com>
                              > wrote:
                              Dear Group,
                              Re:train routes. There have been recent discussions of routes taken during
                              the deportations, and the wonderful work of some of our members in getting
                              the list of trains, translated and into the group resouces. While further
                              musing on these I came across the account by Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik.

                              Zofia Ptasnik was deported in April 1940 from the family estate in
                              Szczeploty in western Ukraine to the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan. She
                              kept a diary on the journey and beyond. The diary miraculously survived, has
                              been translated, published in 5 parts in the Sarmatian Review and is on the
                              web at:

                              www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia

                              where it can be read in its entirety.

                              For the myself and the group I have extracted below from the account all
                              references to PLACES along the route, the time frame, with references as
                              well as to other trains that the transport Zofia Malachowska Ptasnik was on
                              met along the route. With a good map of the territory inferences can be made
                              from this as to the possible journeys of our parents and grandparents at
                              this time and on the other 3 transport dates.

                              The knock at midnight comes on April 13.

                              Sunday, April 14, 1940 at 7am she joins others at JAWOROW. People are also
                              being brought here from Niemirow and the train waits the entire day as new
                              people are brought from the town of Jaworow itself and the surrounding
                              villages. There are two women from Ulicko. (Jaworow, I looked up, is 30
                              miles west of Lwow)

                              The train consists of 40 cars, each boxcar containing 30 people.

                              She is writing from Podzamcze (Lwow freight railway station) and describes a
                              morning transfer onto a Russian wide-guage boxcar. There is much activity at
                              the station with news going around of at least ten long trains passing
                              through the station filled with people from Lwow.

                              Monday, April 15 at 5am the train finally leaves LWOW. The train passes
                              KRASNE then SKWARZEW. At 8am it is at ZADWORZE. 11am ZLOCZOW. They meet a
                              train packed with people from Jaworow. 12.30 PLUCZKOW. 3pm JEZIERNA. Evening
                              HLUBOCZYK WIELK, TARNOPOL where they meet a train with people deported from
                              Przemysl, Grodek and Chodorow. The train stops for the night at MAKSYMOWKA
                              ( Maksymovka)where it leaves early the next morning.

                              Tuesday, April 16, BOGDANOWK (Bohdanovka) and POWLOCZYSKA(Povlochyska)
                              around 9am ZBRUCZand halts at WOLOCZYSKA(Volochyska). By this time they have
                              been locked up for 2 long days and nights.

                              Wednesday, April 17 the train has been on the move all night and many miles
                              now separate them from Poland. 7am the train stops at ZHMIRINKA. There are
                              trains with people deprted from Przemysl, Chodorow, Podhajec, Rohatyn pulled
                              by "magnificent locomotives that roar steam power." At Zhmirinka they are at
                              last given a bucket of water. WINNICA (Vynnytsa). 6.30pm KALYNIVKA
                              (Koziatyn). During the night the train passes KIEV.

                              Thursday, April 18, YEZHYN, 8am. They still have no idea of where they are
                              going. BERELYZH1pm. DYAKONOVO.

                              Friday, April 19, KURSK They meet trains with deportees from Przemysl,
                              Sadowa, Wisznia and Grodek. And another train from Lwow had just left the
                              station. More trains from Podhajec, Chodorow and Przemysl.

                              Saturday, April 20. PLESHKOV-CHEREMISINOVO.
                              In the morning they pass KALORSK and VORONEZH This is the second week.
                              GRYAZI (Hriasy) A station full of trains. PESKOVATKA. They meet a train from
                              Nadrozna. KOCHETOVKA. After which they are overtaken by a train of people
                              deported from Przemysl and Zimna Woda.

                              Sunday, April 21, SVIZY (Sviazy) 9am. Meet a train from Grodek and Podhajce.
                              After 9 days of travel it is still anybody's guess as to their final
                              destination. BASHMAKOVO, PACHELMA

                              Monday, April 22, KUZNETS. They meet a train from Sokal full of Red Army
                              soldiers. NOVOSPASSKOE. SYZRAN. They arrive in SICZYN (Sichyn) on the Volga.
                              MILANY. The train goes along the Volga " a beautiful wide river."
                              BATRAKY-on-the-Volga.

                              Tuesday, April 23, SAMARA. MARICHEVKA. BUZULUK.

                              Wednesday, April 24 (In Asia) In the night they pass the Ural River. 2pm in
                              ORENBURG.
                              They had passed a train from Lesko and Sambor. 9pm AKBULAK (a journey of
                              "2,200 miles)

                              Thursday, April 25, 8am. AKTYUBINSK, KAZAKH SSR ( Soviet Republic of
                              Kazakhstan)
                              The train had arrrived the evening before and is "shunted back and forth"
                              9am They are unloaded and moved to a "road transport" (truck) At 3.30 pm
                              they are loaded onto trucks. After 2 hours a 45 minute stop at
                              NOVOROSSIISKOYE. In darkness they arrive at Sarsai, where their exile began.
                              They have been confined in the boxcar for 12 and a half days. End of Part
                              one of the diary.

                              Introduction from the Samartian Review
                              Daughter of Kajetan Malachowski and Aleksandra Peplowska, Zofia Ptasnik was
                              born on March 14, 1890, at the family estate of Szczeploty in western
                              Ukraine, a member of the substantial Polish minority in western Ukraine that
                              became part of the Polish state after the Polish-Soviet war of 1919-1920 and
                              the Treaty of Riga (1922). In 1925 Zofia married Jan Ptasnik, Professor of
                              History at Jan Kazimierz University, in Lviv (Lwów in Polish) and at the
                              Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He husband died in 1930. They had one son
                              named Mieczyslaw. After her husband's death, Mrs. Ptasnik administered the
                              family estate between 1930-1939.
                              Shortly after the outbreak of World War II on September 1, 1939, and the
                              Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, Mrs. Ptasnik's sister, Jadwiga
                              (Winia) Malachowska Popiel (Professor Bronislaw Popiel's widow) was arrested
                              and deported to an unknown location in the Soviet northeast where she
                              perished without a trace. Then on April 13, 1940, Zofia Ptasnik was arrested
                              and deported to the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan where she was forced
                              into slave labor. She died on July 25, 1941 and was buried in the steppe of
                              northern Kazakhstan. A year later, the cross marking her grave gave way to a
                              new railway line. Her Diary covers the period from April 14, 1940 to May 26,
                              1941.

                              May she be remembered.
                              Regards,
                              Beata

                              ---------------------------------
                              Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo Mobile. Try it
                              now.

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                              ---------------------------------
                              Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo Mobile. Try it
                              now.

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • john guzlowski
                              I ve followed the discussion about the train routes with much interest. Thank you all. My father was taken to Germany rather than Siberia, but he talked about
                              Message 14 of 24 , Nov 24, 2007
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                                I've followed the discussion about the train routes with much
                                interest. Thank you all.

                                My father was taken to Germany rather than Siberia, but he talked
                                about the uncertainty he felt as he was traveling away from Poland.
                                He was not an educated man and didn't have much knowledge of the
                                world beyond the village he came from north of Poznan.

                                I thought you all might like to see a poem I wrote the uncertainty he
                                felt.

                                The poem is in his voice:

                                My Father Talks about the Boxcars

                                The train would slow, and then stop
                                And we would wait for the doors
                                To grind open so we could see
                                Where we were, and sometimes

                                There would be children in the fields
                                Bent over boards or a broken plow
                                And we would beg them for water
                                And they would say, "Dear Jesus,

                                If we only could, but the Germans
                                Would shoot us," and we would beg
                                The children to tell us where we were
                                And we'd ask if they knew where

                                The tracks led—and they'd whisper,
                                the tracks went west to Germany
                                And maybe further but they didn't know,
                                Maybe to America or France.

                                And we would watch the doors
                                Grind back and close with hungry eyes.


                                john guzlowski
                              • Elizabeth
                                Hi John Welcome to the group. You may have noticed in our Files section that we have a folder called poetry by K-S members. I hope you don t object to my
                                Message 15 of 24 , Nov 24, 2007
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                                  Hi John

                                  Welcome to the group. You may have noticed in our Files section that we have
                                  a folder called poetry by K-S members. I hope you don't object to my
                                  starting a page for your poems? Seems like we have a lot of talented writers
                                  in the group! These second generationers seem to have an uncanny talent of
                                  expressing the emotions of their family members even though they have not
                                  experienced these themselves - just like you have here.



                                  pozdrowienia

                                  Elzunia Olsson

                                  Sweden
                                  Gallery Administrator
                                  <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                                  http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html



                                  _____

                                  From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
                                  On Behalf Of john guzlowski
                                  Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2007 10:45 PM
                                  To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Train routes



                                  I've followed the discussion about the train routes with much
                                  interest. Thank you all.

                                  My father was taken to Germany rather than Siberia, but he talked
                                  about the uncertainty he felt as he was traveling away from Poland.
                                  He was not an educated man and didn't have much knowledge of the
                                  world beyond the village he came from north of Poznan.

                                  I thought you all might like to see a poem I wrote the uncertainty he
                                  felt.

                                  The poem is in his voice:

                                  My Father Talks about the Boxcars

                                  The train would slow, and then stop
                                  And we would wait for the doors
                                  To grind open so we could see
                                  Where we were, and sometimes

                                  There would be children in the fields
                                  Bent over boards or a broken plow
                                  And we would beg them for water
                                  And they would say, "Dear Jesus,

                                  If we only could, but the Germans
                                  Would shoot us," and we would beg
                                  The children to tell us where we were
                                  And we'd ask if they knew where

                                  The tracks led-and they'd whisper,
                                  the tracks went west to Germany
                                  And maybe further but they didn't know,
                                  Maybe to America or France.

                                  And we would watch the doors
                                  Grind back and close with hungry eyes.

                                  john guzlowski





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Carol Dove
                                  Elzunia and Group, Since you brought it up, I am forever in awe of the artist in general when reading the diary it brought back the beauty of so many with
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Nov 24, 2007
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                                    Elzunia and Group,

                                    Since you brought it up, I am forever in awe of the artist in general when reading the diary it brought back the beauty of so many with their talents in the arts. So many are known for their works, yet look how many have never been discovered. Writing to drawing and catching a moment in time without a camera. I am forever impressed and honored that they so freely share with us. Thank you to all.

                                    Carol Celinska Dove






                                    Elizabeth <elzunia@...> wrote:
                                    Hi John

                                    Welcome to the group. You may have noticed in our Files section that we have
                                    a folder called poetry by K-S members. I hope you don't object to my
                                    starting a page for your poems? Seems like we have a lot of talented writers
                                    in the group! These second generationers seem to have an uncanny talent of
                                    expressing the emotions of their family members even though they have not
                                    experienced these themselves - just like you have here.

                                    pozdrowienia

                                    Elzunia Olsson

                                    Sweden
                                    Gallery Administrator
                                    <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                                    http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html

                                    _____

                                    From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
                                    On Behalf Of john guzlowski
                                    Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2007 10:45 PM
                                    To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Train routes

                                    I've followed the discussion about the train routes with much
                                    interest. Thank you all.

                                    My father was taken to Germany rather than Siberia, but he talked
                                    about the uncertainty he felt as he was traveling away from Poland.
                                    He was not an educated man and didn't have much knowledge of the
                                    world beyond the village he came from north of Poznan.

                                    I thought you all might like to see a poem I wrote the uncertainty he
                                    felt.

                                    The poem is in his voice:

                                    My Father Talks about the Boxcars

                                    The train would slow, and then stop
                                    And we would wait for the doors
                                    To grind open so we could see
                                    Where we were, and sometimes

                                    There would be children in the fields
                                    Bent over boards or a broken plow
                                    And we would beg them for water
                                    And they would say, "Dear Jesus,

                                    If we only could, but the Germans
                                    Would shoot us," and we would beg
                                    The children to tell us where we were
                                    And we'd ask if they knew where

                                    The tracks led-and they'd whisper,
                                    the tracks went west to Germany
                                    And maybe further but they didn't know,
                                    Maybe to America or France.

                                    And we would watch the doors
                                    Grind back and close with hungry eyes.

                                    john guzlowski

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                                  • ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI
                                    Linder, in relation to your father s deporttion from Lviv prison. The train list which Beata refers to is a train which conveyed families from Kresy.It is true
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Nov 25, 2007
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                                      Linder,
                                      in relation to your father's deporttion from Lviv prison.
                                      The train list which Beata refers to is a train which conveyed families from Kresy.It is true that Jaworow is near to Nahaciv and Lviv.
                                      Your father was arrested early in the war period for transgression at the border, as you described and sentenced to serve in jail in Lviv, as I understand.It is unlikely he would have been sent on that sort of train with families.The most possible transportation would have been in 1941 when many prisoners were deported just ahead of German advance.Your father was not a political or military prisoner, had he been then he would not have been deported, but shot at one of the jails. These trains were of a military type with special escorts.There were many prisoners sent to Kherson in the Eastern Ukraine in the first instance and then disperssed to camps in USSR. Many were sent to Perm region and there is no knowing exactly where he was; suffice to say; just as you mentioned, he might have been in Krasnoyarsk region.
                                      We are searching for 'a needle in a hay stack' Linder, we need a little more reference from somewhere.
                                      antoni530

                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • john guzlowski
                                      Elzunia, I would be happy to have the poem in the file. And thanks for mentioning the file. I m going there right now to read. John Guzlowski ... that we have
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Nov 25, 2007
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                                        Elzunia, I would be happy to have the poem in the file.

                                        And thanks for mentioning the file. I'm going there right now to
                                        read.

                                        John Guzlowski



                                        --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "Elizabeth" <elzunia@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Hi John
                                        >
                                        > Welcome to the group. You may have noticed in our Files section
                                        that we have
                                        > a folder called poetry by K-S members. I hope you don't object to my
                                        > starting a page for your poems? Seems like we have a lot of
                                        talented writers
                                        > in the group! These second generationers seem to have an uncanny
                                        talent of
                                        > expressing the emotions of their family members even though they
                                        have not
                                        > experienced these themselves - just like you have here.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > pozdrowienia
                                        >
                                        > Elzunia Olsson
                                        >
                                        > Sweden
                                        > Gallery Administrator
                                        > <http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html>
                                        > http://www.kresy-siberia.org/photo.html
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > _____
                                        >
                                        > From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-
                                        Siberia@yahoogroups.com]
                                        > On Behalf Of john guzlowski
                                        > Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2007 10:45 PM
                                        > To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                        > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Train routes
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > I've followed the discussion about the train routes with much
                                        > interest. Thank you all.
                                        >
                                        > My father was taken to Germany rather than Siberia, but he talked
                                        > about the uncertainty he felt as he was traveling away from Poland.
                                        > He was not an educated man and didn't have much knowledge of the
                                        > world beyond the village he came from north of Poznan.
                                        >
                                        > I thought you all might like to see a poem I wrote the uncertainty
                                        he
                                        > felt.
                                        >
                                        > The poem is in his voice:
                                        >
                                        > My Father Talks about the Boxcars
                                        >
                                        > The train would slow, and then stop
                                        > And we would wait for the doors
                                        > To grind open so we could see
                                        > Where we were, and sometimes
                                        >
                                        > There would be children in the fields
                                        > Bent over boards or a broken plow
                                        > And we would beg them for water
                                        > And they would say, "Dear Jesus,
                                        >
                                        > If we only could, but the Germans
                                        > Would shoot us," and we would beg
                                        > The children to tell us where we were
                                        > And we'd ask if they knew where
                                        >
                                        > The tracks led-and they'd whisper,
                                        > the tracks went west to Germany
                                        > And maybe further but they didn't know,
                                        > Maybe to America or France.
                                        >
                                        > And we would watch the doors
                                        > Grind back and close with hungry eyes.
                                        >
                                        > john guzlowski
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        >
                                      • ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI
                                        Zbigniew, Zloczow to Mandeleyevo in Perm region. What a task? One assumes it would have been in February 1940. I cannot see a direct train; were they taken
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Nov 27, 2007
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                                          Zbigniew,
                                          Zloczow to Mandeleyevo in Perm region. What a task?
                                          One assumes it would have been in February 1940.
                                          I cannot see a direct train; were they taken there without a change on the way? the lists do not give a direct tarnsport on that route. I am not sure if there was a line directly to Mandeleyevo; it is not shown on one of the maps Linder sent me, but I cannot see a destination so close to this place either.
                                          The other point is did they leave Zloczow or another near-by station like Ozydow or Brody? Buczacz would be too far from Zloczow to join.There was a train from there also.
                                          In addition a train from HluboczekWielki-- Zbaraz to Mandeleyevo, but a different place ( it is a popular name in Russia) in Molotovskaya oblast and not in Perm-Komi area.
                                          Have you seen the lists Alex posted into KS files?
                                          Mandeleyevo in Perm is not listed.
                                          antoni530



                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Beata Kalinska
                                          Antoni, I too find these virtual excusions into the Heart of Darkness that was Soviet Russia very interesting. As a child I grew up thinking it was this
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Nov 27, 2007
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                                            Antoni, I too find these virtual excusions into the "Heart of Darkness" that was Soviet Russia very interesting. As a child I grew up thinking it was this Black Hole without human dimensions. Now later in my life the computer is revealing itself more each day as a means to conquer it and fill that awful gap with knowledge. The company of knowedgeable, committed people at Kresy~Siberia is a boon.

                                            As regards Zbigniew's question, would this site be of help. And if not for Zbigniew, someone else might have had family sent here.

                                            http://www.mccme.ru/putevod/11/11eng.html

                                            This is the Komi region. There is a map and much information. Rail links were through the Moscow ~Kotlas line which went through Gorki and Kazan. Perm is further down the line

                                            The site also says :

                                            "In 1937, the construction of the railroad between Kotlas and Vorkuta began; it was open for traffic in 1941. All these industrial developments were mainly created by the prisoners of the concentration ("labor") camps: Sevlag ("Lag" is an abbreviation from "lager" — a camp; the administration located in Syktyvkar), UkhtaPechorlag (Chib'yu, later Ukhta), Minlag (Inta), Sevpechlag (Abez'), and Vorkutlag (Vorkuta) are just the most infamous ones. We do not really know how many prisoners were ever sent to the concentration camps in Republic of Komi, but this number must be above a million. We also do not know how many of them died or were eventually executed."

                                            There was also river traffic on the Yychegda River and its tributaries.

                                            Incidently, last night I "was" in the Ural region via Flickr. If you do a search at http://flickr.com/ you never know what might emerge to give a visual dimension. It is amazing to see people now able to travel voluntarily as tourists to the same once very remote places where our parents and grandparents were taken forcibly. A shocking contrast to the stories (fact not fiction) of the box and cattle cars were the photos of sleek, modern trains on rails that our families travelled with fear and despair in their hearts. Food for thought.

                                            Regards to all,
                                            Beata


                                            ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI <askazimierski@...> wrote:
                                            Zbigniew,
                                            Zloczow to Mandeleyevo in Perm region. What a task?
                                            One assumes it would have been in February 1940.
                                            I cannot see a direct train; were they taken there without a change on the way? the lists do not give a direct tarnsport on that route. I am not sure if there was a line directly to Mandeleyevo; it is not shown on one of the maps Linder sent me, but I cannot see a destination so close to this place either.
                                            The other point is did they leave Zloczow or another near-by station like Ozydow or Brody? Buczacz would be too far from Zloczow to join.There was a train from there also.
                                            In addition a train from HluboczekWielki-- Zbaraz to Mandeleyevo, but a different place ( it is a popular name in Russia) in Molotovskaya oblast and not in Perm-Komi area.
                                            Have you seen the lists Alex posted into KS files?
                                            Mandeleyevo in Perm is not listed.
                                            antoni530

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                                          • Krystyna Freiburger
                                            Thank you so much Beatka for the map ....gives me a little more info for my documentation...my family was sent to KOMI SSR. My mother talked about 2 places
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Nov 27, 2007
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                                              Thank you so much Beatka for the map ....gives me a little more info for my documentation...my family was sent to KOMI SSR. My mother talked about 2 places there...... Lowli and Moraszy. I don't know if that is how the names were spelled...going by her pronunciation. I have never been able to find them on a map. I was wondering if anyone can tell me looking at the map Beata sent below where these places might be. Any help will be greatly appreciated
                                              krystyna freiburger
                                              ontario canada
                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              From: Beata Kalinska
                                              To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                              Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2007 3:05 PM
                                              Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Train routes


                                              Antoni, I too find these virtual excusions into the "Heart of Darkness" that was Soviet Russia very interesting. As a child I grew up thinking it was this Black Hole without human dimensions. Now later in my life the computer is revealing itself more each day as a means to conquer it and fill that awful gap with knowledge. The company of knowedgeable, committed people at Kresy~Siberia is a boon.

                                              As regards Zbigniew's question, would this site be of help. And if not for Zbigniew, someone else might have had family sent here.

                                              http://www.mccme.ru/putevod/11/11eng.html

                                              This is the Komi region. There is a map and much information. Rail links were through the Moscow ~Kotlas line which went through Gorki and Kazan. Perm is further down the line

                                              The site also says :

                                              "In 1937, the construction of the railroad between Kotlas and Vorkuta began; it was open for traffic in 1941. All these industrial developments were mainly created by the prisoners of the concentration ("labor") camps: Sevlag ("Lag" is an abbreviation from "lager" - a camp; the administration located in Syktyvkar), UkhtaPechorlag (Chib'yu, later Ukhta), Minlag (Inta), Sevpechlag (Abez'), and Vorkutlag (Vorkuta) are just the most infamous ones. We do not really know how many prisoners were ever sent to the concentration camps in Republic of Komi, but this number must be above a million. We also do not know how many of them died or were eventually executed."

                                              There was also river traffic on the Yychegda River and its tributaries.

                                              Incidently, last night I "was" in the Ural region via Flickr. If you do a search at http://flickr.com/ you never know what might emerge to give a visual dimension. It is amazing to see people now able to travel voluntarily as tourists to the same once very remote places where our parents and grandparents were taken forcibly. A shocking contrast to the stories (fact not fiction) of the box and cattle cars were the photos of sleek, modern trains on rails that our families travelled with fear and despair in their hearts. Food for thought.

                                              Regards to all,
                                              Beata


                                              ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI <askazimierski@...> wrote:
                                              Zbigniew,
                                              Zloczow to Mandeleyevo in Perm region. What a task?
                                              One assumes it would have been in February 1940.
                                              I cannot see a direct train; were they taken there without a change on the way? the lists do not give a direct tarnsport on that route. I am not sure if there was a line directly to Mandeleyevo; it is not shown on one of the maps Linder sent me, but I cannot see a destination so close to this place either.
                                              The other point is did they leave Zloczow or another near-by station like Ozydow or Brody? Buczacz would be too far from Zloczow to join.There was a train from there also.
                                              In addition a train from HluboczekWielki-- Zbaraz to Mandeleyevo, but a different place ( it is a popular name in Russia) in Molotovskaya oblast and not in Perm-Komi area.
                                              Have you seen the lists Alex posted into KS files?
                                              Mandeleyevo in Perm is not listed.
                                              antoni530

                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                                            • thymetrax
                                              Eduard; Where would one find this diary written in Polish before it was translated? I should like to read it to my mother. Pozdrawiam Krystyna ... historian
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Nov 27, 2007
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                                                Eduard;
                                                Where would one find this diary written in Polish before it was
                                                translated?
                                                I should like to read it to my mother.
                                                Pozdrawiam Krystyna

                                                --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "Eduard Wojciulewicz"
                                                <eduard@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > I saw the name Malachowski.
                                                > This is the page of Kaj Malachowski from Warszawa. He is a good
                                                historian
                                                > and researcher, and specialist in genealogy and heraldry :
                                                > http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/2739/
                                                > e-mail : malachowo@...
                                                > Family?
                                                > Eduard
                                                >
                                                > -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
                                                > Van: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                > [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com]Namens Carol Dove
                                                > Verzonden: zaterdag 24 november 2007 16:44
                                                > Aan: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com; kresy-siberia@yahoogroups.com
                                                > Onderwerp: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Sarmatia archives
                                                >
                                                > Beata,
                                                >
                                                > I am still reading through the archives and wanted to ask you, can
                                                we send
                                                > this on to others to help educate. I noticed alot of the stories in
                                                the
                                                > Sarmatia come from information obtained at Hoover inst.., not so
                                                much by the
                                                > family but more by writers. Is this becoming more popular where
                                                writers are
                                                > seaching out our family information to write books? This story
                                                below was
                                                > just being discussed in here about the 1939-44 murders in eastern
                                                Poland.
                                                > For the ones that need this info I found it in archive I believe it
                                                was
                                                > April.
                                                >
                                                > Thank you for the great link Beata, Carol Celinska Dove
                                                > "Neither Twenty Million, nor Russians, nor War Dead . .." by Norman
                                                Davies
                                                > Beata Kalinska < beatakalinska@... <mailto:beatakalinska%
                                                40yahoo.com>
                                                > > wrote:
                                                > Dear Group,
                                                > Re:train routes. There have been recent discussions of routes taken
                                                during
                                                > the deportations, and the wonderful work of some of our members in
                                                getting
                                                > the list of trains, translated and into the group resouces. While
                                                further
                                                > musing on these I came across the account by Zofia Malachowska
                                                Ptasnik.
                                                >
                                                > Zofia Ptasnik was deported in April 1940 from the family estate in
                                                > Szczeploty in western Ukraine to the Aktyubinsk Region of
                                                Kazakhstan. She
                                                > kept a diary on the journey and beyond. The diary miraculously
                                                survived, has
                                                > been translated, published in 5 parts in the Sarmatian Review and
                                                is on the
                                                > web at:
                                                >
                                                > www.ruf.rice.edu/~sarmatia
                                                >
                                                > where it can be read in its entirety.
                                                >
                                                > For the myself and the group I have extracted below from the
                                                account all
                                                > references to PLACES along the route, the time frame, with
                                                references as
                                                > well as to other trains that the transport Zofia Malachowska
                                                Ptasnik was on
                                                > met along the route. With a good map of the territory inferences
                                                can be made
                                                > from this as to the possible journeys of our parents and
                                                grandparents at
                                                > this time and on the other 3 transport dates.
                                                >
                                                > The knock at midnight comes on April 13.
                                                >
                                                > Sunday, April 14, 1940 at 7am she joins others at JAWOROW. People
                                                are also
                                                > being brought here from Niemirow and the train waits the entire day
                                                as new
                                                > people are brought from the town of Jaworow itself and the
                                                surrounding
                                                > villages. There are two women from Ulicko. (Jaworow, I looked up,
                                                is 30
                                                > miles west of Lwow)
                                                >
                                                > The train consists of 40 cars, each boxcar containing 30 people.
                                                >
                                                > She is writing from Podzamcze (Lwow freight railway station) and
                                                describes a
                                                > morning transfer onto a Russian wide-guage boxcar. There is much
                                                activity at
                                                > the station with news going around of at least ten long trains
                                                passing
                                                > through the station filled with people from Lwow.
                                                >
                                                > Monday, April 15 at 5am the train finally leaves LWOW. The train
                                                passes
                                                > KRASNE then SKWARZEW. At 8am it is at ZADWORZE. 11am ZLOCZOW. They
                                                meet a
                                                > train packed with people from Jaworow. 12.30 PLUCZKOW. 3pm
                                                JEZIERNA. Evening
                                                > HLUBOCZYK WIELK, TARNOPOL where they meet a train with people
                                                deported from
                                                > Przemysl, Grodek and Chodorow. The train stops for the night at
                                                MAKSYMOWKA
                                                > ( Maksymovka)where it leaves early the next morning.
                                                >
                                                > Tuesday, April 16, BOGDANOWK (Bohdanovka) and POWLOCZYSKA
                                                (Povlochyska)
                                                > around 9am ZBRUCZand halts at WOLOCZYSKA(Volochyska). By this time
                                                they have
                                                > been locked up for 2 long days and nights.
                                                >
                                                > Wednesday, April 17 the train has been on the move all night and
                                                many miles
                                                > now separate them from Poland. 7am the train stops at ZHMIRINKA.
                                                There are
                                                > trains with people deprted from Przemysl, Chodorow, Podhajec,
                                                Rohatyn pulled
                                                > by "magnificent locomotives that roar steam power." At Zhmirinka
                                                they are at
                                                > last given a bucket of water. WINNICA (Vynnytsa). 6.30pm KALYNIVKA
                                                > (Koziatyn). During the night the train passes KIEV.
                                                >
                                                > Thursday, April 18, YEZHYN, 8am. They still have no idea of where
                                                they are
                                                > going. BERELYZH1pm. DYAKONOVO.
                                                >
                                                > Friday, April 19, KURSK They meet trains with deportees from
                                                Przemysl,
                                                > Sadowa, Wisznia and Grodek. And another train from Lwow had just
                                                left the
                                                > station. More trains from Podhajec, Chodorow and Przemysl.
                                                >
                                                > Saturday, April 20. PLESHKOV-CHEREMISINOVO.
                                                > In the morning they pass KALORSK and VORONEZH This is the second
                                                week.
                                                > GRYAZI (Hriasy) A station full of trains. PESKOVATKA. They meet a
                                                train from
                                                > Nadrozna. KOCHETOVKA. After which they are overtaken by a train of
                                                people
                                                > deported from Przemysl and Zimna Woda.
                                                >
                                                > Sunday, April 21, SVIZY (Sviazy) 9am. Meet a train from Grodek and
                                                Podhajce.
                                                > After 9 days of travel it is still anybody's guess as to their final
                                                > destination. BASHMAKOVO, PACHELMA
                                                >
                                                > Monday, April 22, KUZNETS. They meet a train from Sokal full of Red
                                                Army
                                                > soldiers. NOVOSPASSKOE. SYZRAN. They arrive in SICZYN (Sichyn) on
                                                the Volga.
                                                > MILANY. The train goes along the Volga " a beautiful wide river."
                                                > BATRAKY-on-the-Volga.
                                                >
                                                > Tuesday, April 23, SAMARA. MARICHEVKA. BUZULUK.
                                                >
                                                > Wednesday, April 24 (In Asia) In the night they pass the Ural
                                                River. 2pm in
                                                > ORENBURG.
                                                > They had passed a train from Lesko and Sambor. 9pm AKBULAK (a
                                                journey of
                                                > "2,200 miles)
                                                >
                                                > Thursday, April 25, 8am. AKTYUBINSK, KAZAKH SSR ( Soviet Republic of
                                                > Kazakhstan)
                                                > The train had arrrived the evening before and is "shunted back and
                                                forth"
                                                > 9am They are unloaded and moved to a "road transport" (truck) At
                                                3.30 pm
                                                > they are loaded onto trucks. After 2 hours a 45 minute stop at
                                                > NOVOROSSIISKOYE. In darkness they arrive at Sarsai, where their
                                                exile began.
                                                > They have been confined in the boxcar for 12 and a half days. End
                                                of Part
                                                > one of the diary.
                                                >
                                                > Introduction from the Samartian Review
                                                > Daughter of Kajetan Malachowski and Aleksandra Peplowska, Zofia
                                                Ptasnik was
                                                > born on March 14, 1890, at the family estate of Szczeploty in
                                                western
                                                > Ukraine, a member of the substantial Polish minority in western
                                                Ukraine that
                                                > became part of the Polish state after the Polish-Soviet war of 1919-
                                                1920 and
                                                > the Treaty of Riga (1922). In 1925 Zofia married Jan Ptasnik,
                                                Professor of
                                                > History at Jan Kazimierz University, in Lviv (Lwów in Polish) and
                                                at the
                                                > Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He husband died in 1930. They
                                                had one son
                                                > named Mieczyslaw. After her husband's death, Mrs. Ptasnik
                                                administered the
                                                > family estate between 1930-1939.
                                                > Shortly after the outbreak of World War II on September 1, 1939,
                                                and the
                                                > Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, Mrs. Ptasnik's sister,
                                                Jadwiga
                                                > (Winia) Malachowska Popiel (Professor Bronislaw Popiel's widow) was
                                                arrested
                                                > and deported to an unknown location in the Soviet northeast where
                                                she
                                                > perished without a trace. Then on April 13, 1940, Zofia Ptasnik was
                                                arrested
                                                > and deported to the Aktyubinsk Region of Kazakhstan where she was
                                                forced
                                                > into slave labor. She died on July 25, 1941 and was buried in the
                                                steppe of
                                                > northern Kazakhstan. A year later, the cross marking her grave gave
                                                way to a
                                                > new railway line. Her Diary covers the period from April 14, 1940
                                                to May 26,
                                                > 1941.
                                                >
                                                > May she be remembered.
                                                > Regards,
                                                > Beata
                                                >
                                                > ---------------------------------
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                                                >
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                                                >
                                                > ---------------------------------
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                                                > now.
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                                                >
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                                              • ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI
                                                Krystyna, I ll send you a copy of the present day map; some boundaries of oblasti were different in 1940. I think Linder had a map of USSR of that date, but
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Nov 29, 2007
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                                                  Krystyna,
                                                  I'll send you a copy of the present day map; some boundaries of oblasti were different in 1940.
                                                  I think Linder had a map of USSR of that date, but even then I do not know if it shows all the boundaries of oblasti.
                                                  antoni530

                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • Steve Szewczuk
                                                  Hi Antoni I am keeping track of the correspondence between you and Krystyna with a view to gaining any additional insight into my mother s family s fate.
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Nov 29, 2007
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                                                    Hi Antoni

                                                    I am keeping track of the correspondence between you and Krystyna with a view to gaining any additional insight into my mother's family's fate. Krystyna's mother and my mother were from the same settlement, Wola Goluchowska, and my understanding is that my mothers family ended up somewhere in Archangelsk. My grandfathers name was Ignacy/Ignatius Bednarczyk.

                                                    Regards
                                                    Stefan

                                                    >>> "ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI" <askazimierski@...> 29/11/2007 10:41 >>>
                                                    Krystyna,
                                                    I'll send you a copy of the present day map; some boundaries of oblasti were different in 1940.
                                                    I think Linder had a map of USSR of that date, but even then I do not know if it shows all the boundaries of oblasti.
                                                    antoni530

                                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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