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  • rich widerynski
    Dear Group, I read the book and thought it was wonderful. I think what we need to do is read books that others have written about Polish subjects and form our
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 5, 2007
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      Dear Group,

      I read the book and thought it was wonderful.  I think what we need to do is read books that others have written about Polish subjects and form our own judgements.   Some reviewers can inject their color or opinions not having been involved in any way or bringing to the fore opinions that are not pertinent.   I have included a terrible review of this book from the Washington Post.  Nonetheless it is an opinion.  Enjoy.

      Rich Widerynski, California

      The Blind Prisoner

      How a Polish noble survived World War II when other prisoners of war didn't.

      Reviewed by Susie Linfield

      Sunday, April 22, 2007; Page BW03

      MICHELANGELO IN RAVENSBRUCK

      One Woman's War Against the Nazis

      By Karolina Lanckoronska

      Translated from the Polish by Noel Clark

      Merloyd Lawrence/Da Capo. 341 pp. $26

      This is a fascinating book, though for reasons its author may not have entirely intended. Written in 1945-46 but just published in the United States , Michelangelo in Ravensbruck is a memoir of the German and Soviet occupations of Poland -- but it is not the kind of World War II memoir we are used to. The author, who died in 2002 at the age of 104, was a wealthy countess, a professor of art history, a devout Catholic, a fervent anticommunist and a member of the Polish underground. In 1942, she was arrested by the Gestapo, which sent her to a series of prisons and then to Ravensbruck, the women's concentration camp north of Berlin . But because of who she was -- and who she was not -- Karolina Lanckoronska's experience, and the meaning she makes of it, differed in fundamental ways from those of Jewish camp survivors such as Primo Levi and Jean Améry. Her account is as interesting, and as valuable, for what she puts in as for what she leaves out.

      Lanckoronska was one very tough dame. In the winter of 1939, shortly after Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union , a Soviet officer came to arrest her. "Not just now. I haven't time," she told him. "I'm due at the university." Her interrogations by the Gestapo were cat-and-mouse games in which Lanckoronska always came out on top in terms of guts, brains and integrity. "Are you an enemy of the German Reich?" Gestapo chief Hans Kruger, who became her nemesis, demanded. "Yes, obviously," Lanckoronska coolly replied. Deposited in her first Gestapo prison, she sat on her bed, ate a hard-boiled egg and promptly fell into a good, sound sleep -- behavior so preternaturally calm that she terrified her cellmate, who figured the new arrival must be crazy.

      Lanckoronska's confidence may have derived, in part, from her aristocratic upbringing -- which is not to say that most of Poland 's nobles behaved likewise. Lanckoronska exhibited not only an almost breezy insouciance but, more important, a deep and intuitive understanding of human solidarity. Whenever possible, she tended to the needs of sick prisoners, shared the bulk of her rations (as a special prisoner, she was allowed huge quantities of food), and, most of all, refused the privileges afforded her. In Ravensbruck, she was given a warm apartment, fresh flowers, afternoon tea, walks in the garden and good meals served on porcelain. She despised all this -- indeed, she regarded such privileges as a form of humiliation -- and launched a hunger strike until she was reunited with the other inmates. "I should be treated in the same way as other Polish women prisoners since I, too, was an Untermensch," she insisted. When her campaign succeeded and she was sent back to the filthy, cold, communal barracks, she noted: "With great joy, I once more sewed the number and triangle on to my striped camp uniform and breathed a deep sigh of relief. . . . I was just happy being in the camp."

      One can -- indeed must -- admire this; yet words like "joy" and "happy" are a key to the troubling peculiarities of this book. For a variety of reasons -- including her class status, her fluent German and her knowledge of a particular but then-secret Nazi crime -- Lanckoronska's stays in the prisons and the camp were quite different from those of most others (her protectors included the Red Cross, the Italian royal family and Heinrich Himmler). Lanckoronska knows and acknowledges this. But her comparatively mild (I use the term advisedly) treatment rested, too, on the simple but crucial fact that she was not a Jew.

      The iconography of Christian martyrdom and Christian valor suffuses this book; how else to understand Lanckoronska's statement that being sent to a concentration camp was "a great honour"? Indeed, for Lanckoronska , Poland 's anti-Nazi resistance was in large part a religious movement that evoked "the spirit of the Crusades" and thereby created "a firm link with the Middle Ages" (she regards this as a good thing). She never hints at the possibility that Polish Catholicism's highly vexed relationship to the so-called Jewish question, both before and during the war, may have contributed to the murder of more than two and a half million Polish Jews.

      Lanckoronska, however, frames the war as a simple two-way struggle between Polish patriots and German invaders. "The persecution of all Poles aroused in our society . . . complete unity among the Polish people," she writes. This is utter nonsense. Lanckoronska knew -- must have known -- that there were deep divisions between and among Poles, and within the underground itself; that the story of the war was one of craven, sometimes eager collaboration as well as of courageous resistance; and that it was entirely possible, and even commonplace, to be a committed Polish patriot, a brave anti-fascist and a rabid anti-Semite all at once. In Lanckoronska's account, the Nazis' annihilation of European Jewry -- much of which took place in obscure Polish towns with names like Auschwitz , Treblinka and Sobibor -- is a fairly unimportant subset of the greater Polish tragedy. Here is the book's description of the aforementioned Kruger: "In 1942, . . . [he] sentenced to death 250 Polish members of the local intelligentsia. Also responsible for the death of more than 10,000 Jews."

      Yet those elisions -- that "also" -- are part of what makes this such a compelling glimpse into a vanished world and a vanished mindset. Lanckoronska was part of a prewar Polish culture that has been tossed in the dustbin of history. With its stoic code of aristocratic honor, mythologized patriotism, hatred of Eastern "barbarism" and adoration of the West, her kind will not be seen again. (For good or ill: It is startling to read, for instance, of Lanckoronska's "frenzy of delight" when Germany invades the Soviet Union in 1941.)

      In an essay called "At the Mind's Limits," Jean Améry wrote that the mad reality of Auschwitz abolished the intellect: "Thinking . . . nullified itself." For Lanckoronska, the opposite was true: "Intellectual riches," she writes, were the prisoners' "one great source of strength," especially as the war wound down and the killings sped up. (The title of her book refers to the art-history classes she held in Ravensbruck.) Améry was a leftist and a secular Jew; yet his ethos was not really far from Lanckoronska's, for they were both children of Enlightenment humanism. The chasm between their understandings of what the camps did, and of how (or if) one could survive them, is based partly on who they were: Lanckoronska's faith and patriotism, both of which Améry lacked, undoubtedly sustained her. But the difference is based, too, on what was and wasn't done to each of them. Améry, like Lanckoronska, was originally arrested as a member of the resistance, but it was as a Jew that he was marked for slavery and death; Lanckoronska was allowed, at least for long periods, to think and write and read Tacitus and Petrarch. Her book reminds us that war is an individual event, even when it involves millions, and that every victim is particular in her circumstance, her strength and her sorrow. ·

      Susie Linfield directs the Cultural Reporting and Criticism Program at New York University.

       


       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Krystyna Styrna-Buyukpinar
      Sent: Aug 5, 2007 5:35 AM
      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: New book "Michelangelo in Ravensbruck"by countess K. Lanckoronska

      To Linder;
      found on the internet info to your question
       
      Lanckoronska, Karolina. Michelangelo in Ravensbrück: One Woman's War Against the Nazis. Merloyd Lawrence: Perseus. Apr. 2007. c.368p. tr. from Polish by Noel Clark. photogs. index. ISBN 0-306-81537- 0 [ISBN 978-0-306-81537- 9]. $26. HISTORY

       
      The experience of Polish Christians under Nazi occupation is sometimes referred to as "the forgotten Holocaust" because nearly one-third of the general population died during the war years. Although numerous wartime journals and postwar memoirs by Polish Jews have been published, this account by Lanckoronska (1898–2002), an art history professor and member of the Polish nobility (she was a countess), adds to the smaller body of literature in English on the gentile experience. Her account of working with the Polish resistance and of her imprisonment in the Ravensbrück concentration camp for women was written directly after the war but not published until 50 years later, in its original Polish. Translated for a British edition in 2005, the book is compelling reading, especially as it reveals the parallel, and sometimes intersecting, worlds of Polish Christians and Jews. One of the more interesting sections details Lanckoronska' s postwar effort to help convict a Nazi official for the murder of Polish university professors. Unfortunately, Lanckoronska' s upper-class experience may not have been typical, and her memoir suffers from the usual problems of recollection, as when she depicts herself as emotionally calm during encounters with Nazi officials.
       
      Linder hope this answers some of your questions
      Krystyna Styrna

      Linder Ladbrooke <ladbrooke@ntlworld. com> wrote:
      Anelia [NZ],
       
      Please can you give more details about this new book'
       
      Title?
      written by?
      printed by?
      ISBN number?
      where can I buy it?
       
      Linder
      From: "bechta1936" <bechta1936@yahoo. com.au>
      To: <Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com>
      Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: New book "Michelangelo in Ravensbruck" by countess K. Lanckoronska
      Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2007 05:07:59 +0100

      Describes life in Lwow from Sept. 1939 then Krakow, Stanislawow and
      Lwow prisons and 2 years in Ravensbruck. A professor, she worked
      with the Polish Red Cross.
      To quote from a preface written by Eva Hoffman: "While the human
      dimension of the Holocaust has been made indelibly vivid through a
      body of powerful personal testimonies, the other aspects of the
      Polish war are known, at best, as remote history. Lanckoronska' s
      narrative, written mostly during the war years, gives us rare
      insight into some of complexities of Poland's history".
      The book is so new in fact that some of the pages are missing in my
      edition.
      Aniela - N.Z.

      --- In Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, Zbigniew Bob Styrna
      <styrna@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Aneta,
      >
      >
      >
      > Jak sie masz ?
      >
      >
      >
      > Thank you for sharing this important Anniversary with us/me. God
      only knows
      > how horrible it must have been for the people back then.
      >
      >
      >
      > I know a little about Powazki Cmentarz. My father's brother,
      Stanislaw
      > Styrna ( because if Russian translation , they spelled it Sterna)
      is buried
      > there. All I have is this note my father left behind when he
      passed away:
      >
      >
      >
      > " Odnalazlem pomnik swojego braciszka na cmentarzu w srod oficerow
      i
      > polkownikow i generalow na Powazkach w Warszawie. Walczyl w
      Warszawie w
      > Pierwszej Dywizj Wojska Polskiego 1944 roku w inwazj "
      >
      >
      >
      > He was killed in Pludy near Kastelu. Not sure where or what that
      is. But
      > he ended up in this Army Cemetary in Warszawa near some Generals
      and
      > officers.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Nazdrowie
      >
      >
      >
      > Zbigniew
      >
      >
      >
      > Vancouver , Canada
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy-
      Siberia@yahoogroups .com]
      > On Behalf Of Aneta Hoffmann
      > Sent: August 3, 2007 3:51 PM
      > To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
      > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Anniversary of Warsaw Uprising
      >
      >
      >
      > Dear All,
      > thank you very much for your response on my post conc. celebration
      of
      > the Warsaw Uprising anniversary - for your reaction and
      > understanding.
      >
      > In Warsaw as each year - whole city stopped for 1 minute at 5 pm
      on 1
      > August - cars stopped, people get off from them, pedestrians were
      > standing as well, even people in trams and buses stand up. Many
      > candles were ligthened on Powazki Military Cemetery on the graves
      of
      > uprising's soldiers as well near Warsaw Uprising monument and at
      > every place the soldiers were fighting the most... Warsaw
      remembers.
      >
      > Warmest regards,
      >
      > Aneta Hoffmann
      > Warsaw, Poland
      >



      Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.

    • Krystyna Styrna-Buyukpinar
      Dear Group; Thank you Rich; I concur whole heartly as inidicated reviews are personal and could be subjective, therefore we need to read for ourselves and
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 5, 2007
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      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Group;
        Thank you Rich; I concur whole heartly as inidicated reviews are personal and  could be subjective, therefore  we need to read for ourselves and form our own personal opinions.
        Pozdrwiam serdecznie zeslancow Syberji i ich potomstwa
        Krystyna Styrna-Buyukpinar

        rich widerynski <richpna@...> wrote:
        Dear Group,
        I read the book and thought it was wonderful.  I think what we need to do is read books that others have written about Polish subjects and form our own judgements.   Some reviewers can inject their color or opinions not having been involved in any way or bringing to the fore opinions that are not pertinent.   I have included a terrible review of this book from the Washington Post.  Nonetheless it is an opinion.  Enjoy.
        Rich Widerynski, California

        The Blind Prisoner
        How a Polish noble survived World War II when other prisoners of war didn't.
        Reviewed by Susie Linfield
        Sunday, April 22, 2007; Page BW03
        MICHELANGELO IN RAVENSBRUCK
        One Woman's War Against the Nazis
        By Karolina Lanckoronska
        Translated from the Polish by Noel Clark
        Merloyd Lawrence/Da Capo. 341 pp. $26
        This is a fascinating book, though for reasons its author may not have entirely intended. Written in 1945-46 but just published in the United States , Michelangelo in Ravensbruck is a memoir of the German and Soviet occupations of Poland -- but it is not the kind of World War II memoir we are used to. The author, who died in 2002 at the age of 104, was a wealthy countess, a professor of art history, a devout Catholic, a fervent anticommunist and a member of the Polish underground. In 1942, she was arrested by the Gestapo, which sent her to a series of prisons and then to Ravensbruck, the women's concentration camp north of Berlin . But because of who she was -- and who she was not -- Karolina Lanckoronska' s experience, and the meaning she makes of it, differed in fundamental ways from those of Jewish camp survivors such as Primo Levi and Jean Améry. Her account is as interesting, and as valuable, for what she puts in as for what she leaves out.
        Lanckoronska was one very tough dame. In the winter of 1939, shortly after Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union , a Soviet officer came to arrest her. "Not just now. I haven't time," she told him. "I'm due at the university." Her interrogations by the Gestapo were cat-and-mouse games in which Lanckoronska always came out on top in terms of guts, brains and integrity. "Are you an enemy of the German Reich?" Gestapo chief Hans Kruger, who became her nemesis, demanded. "Yes, obviously," Lanckoronska coolly replied. Deposited in her first Gestapo prison, she sat on her bed, ate a hard-boiled egg and promptly fell into a good, sound sleep -- behavior so preternaturally calm that she terrified her cellmate, who figured the new arrival must be crazy.
        Lanckoronska' s confidence may have derived, in part, from her aristocratic upbringing -- which is not to say that most of Poland 's nobles behaved likewise. Lanckoronska exhibited not only an almost breezy insouciance but, more important, a deep and intuitive understanding of human solidarity. Whenever possible, she tended to the needs of sick prisoners, shared the bulk of her rations (as a special prisoner, she was allowed huge quantities of food), and, most of all, refused the privileges afforded her. In Ravensbruck, she was given a warm apartment, fresh flowers, afternoon tea, walks in the garden and good meals served on porcelain. She despised all this -- indeed, she regarded such privileges as a form of humiliation -- and launched a hunger strike until she was reunited with the other inmates. "I should be treated in the same way as other Polish women prisoners since I, too, was an Untermensch," she insisted. When her campaign succeeded and she was sent back to the filthy, cold, communal barracks, she noted: "With great joy, I once more sewed the number and triangle on to my striped camp uniform and breathed a deep sigh of relief. . . . I was just happy being in the camp."
        One can -- indeed must -- admire this; yet words like "joy" and "happy" are a key to the troubling peculiarities of this book. For a variety of reasons -- including her class status, her fluent German and her knowledge of a particular but then-secret Nazi crime -- Lanckoronska' s stays in the prisons and the camp were quite different from those of most others (her protectors included the Red Cross, the Italian royal family and Heinrich Himmler). Lanckoronska knows and acknowledges this. But her comparatively mild (I use the term advisedly) treatment rested, too, on the simple but crucial fact that she was not a Jew.
        The iconography of Christian martyrdom and Christian valor suffuses this book; how else to understand Lanckoronska' s statement that being sent to a concentration camp was "a great honour"? Indeed, for Lanckoronska , Poland 's anti-Nazi resistance was in large part a religious movement that evoked "the spirit of the Crusades" and thereby created "a firm link with the Middle Ages" (she regards this as a good thing). She never hints at the possibility that Polish Catholicism' s highly vexed relationship to the so-called Jewish question, both before and during the war, may have contributed to the murder of more than two and a half million Polish Jews.
        Lanckoronska, however, frames the war as a simple two-way struggle between Polish patriots and German invaders. "The persecution of all Poles aroused in our society . . . complete unity among the Polish people," she writes. This is utter nonsense. Lanckoronska knew -- must have known -- that there were deep divisions between and among Poles, and within the underground itself; that the story of the war was one of craven, sometimes eager collaboration as well as of courageous resistance; and that it was entirely possible, and even commonplace, to be a committed Polish patriot, a brave anti-fascist and a rabid anti-Semite all at once. In Lanckoronska' s account, the Nazis' annihilation of European Jewry -- much of which took place in obscure Polish towns with names like Auschwitz , Treblinka and Sobibor -- is a fairly unimportant subset of the greater Polish tragedy. Here is the book's description of the aforementioned Kruger: "In 1942, . . . [he] sentenced to death 250 Polish members of the local intelligentsia. Also responsible for the death of more than 10,000 Jews."
        Yet those elisions -- that "also" -- are part of what makes this such a compelling glimpse into a vanished world and a vanished mindset. Lanckoronska was part of a prewar Polish culture that has been tossed in the dustbin of history. With its stoic code of aristocratic honor, mythologized patriotism, hatred of Eastern "barbarism" and adoration of the West, her kind will not be seen again. (For good or ill: It is startling to read, for instance, of Lanckoronska' s "frenzy of delight" when Germany invades the Soviet Union in 1941.)
        In an essay called "At the Mind's Limits," Jean Améry wrote that the mad reality of Auschwitz abolished the intellect: "Thinking . . . nullified itself." For Lanckoronska, the opposite was true: "Intellectual riches," she writes, were the prisoners' "one great source of strength," especially as the war wound down and the killings sped up. (The title of her book refers to the art-history classes she held in Ravensbruck. ) Améry was a leftist and a secular Jew; yet his ethos was not really far from Lanckoronska' s, for they were both children of Enlightenment humanism. The chasm between their understandings of what the camps did, and of how (or if) one could survive them, is based partly on who they were: Lanckoronska' s faith and patriotism, both of which Améry lacked, undoubtedly sustained her. But the difference is based, too, on what was and wasn't done to each of them. Améry, like Lanckoronska, was originally arrested as a member of the resistance, but it was as a Jew that he was marked for slavery and death; Lanckoronska was allowed, at least for long periods, to think and write and read Tacitus and Petrarch. Her book reminds us that war is an individual event, even when it involves millions, and that every victim is particular in her circumstance, her strength and her sorrow. ·
        Susie Linfield directs the Cultural Reporting and Criticism Program at New York University.

         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Krystyna Styrna-Buyukpinar
        Sent: Aug 5, 2007 5:35 AM
        To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
        Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: New book "Michelangelo in Ravensbruck" by countess K. Lanckoronska

        To Linder;
        found on the internet info to your question
         
        Lanckoronska, Karolina. Michelangelo in Ravensbrück: One Woman's War Against the Nazis. Merloyd Lawrence: Perseus. Apr. 2007. c.368p. tr. from Polish by Noel Clark. photogs. index. ISBN 0-306-81537- 0 [ISBN 978-0-306-81537- 9]. $26. HISTORY

         
        The experience of Polish Christians under Nazi occupation is sometimes referred to as "the forgotten Holocaust" because nearly one-third of the general population died during the war years. Although numerous wartime journals and postwar memoirs by Polish Jews have been published, this account by Lanckoronska (1898–2002), an art history professor and member of the Polish nobility (she was a countess), adds to the smaller body of literature in English on the gentile experience. Her account of working with the Polish resistance and of her imprisonment in the Ravensbrück concentration camp for women was written directly after the war but not published until 50 years later, in its original Polish. Translated for a British edition in 2005, the book is compelling reading, especially as it reveals the parallel, and sometimes intersecting, worlds of Polish Christians and Jews. One of the more interesting sections details Lanckoronska' s postwar effort to help convict a Nazi official for the murder of Polish university professors. Unfortunately, Lanckoronska' s upper-class experience may not have been typical, and her memoir suffers from the usual problems of recollection, as when she depicts herself as emotionally calm during encounters with Nazi officials.
         
        Linder hope this answers some of your questions
        Krystyna Styrna

        Linder Ladbrooke <ladbrooke@ntlworld. com> wrote:
        Anelia [NZ],
         
        Please can you give more details about this new book'
         
        Title?
        written by?
        printed by?
        ISBN number?
        where can I buy it?
         
        Linder
        From: "bechta1936" <bechta1936@yahoo. com.au>
        To: <Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com>
        Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: New book "Michelangelo in Ravensbruck" by countess K. Lanckoronska
        Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2007 05:07:59 +0100

        Describes life in Lwow from Sept. 1939 then Krakow, Stanislawow and
        Lwow prisons and 2 years in Ravensbruck. A professor, she worked
        with the Polish Red Cross.
        To quote from a preface written by Eva Hoffman: "While the human
        dimension of the Holocaust has been made indelibly vivid through a
        body of powerful personal testimonies, the other aspects of the
        Polish war are known, at best, as remote history. Lanckoronska' s
        narrative, written mostly during the war years, gives us rare
        insight into some of complexities of Poland's history".
        The book is so new in fact that some of the pages are missing in my
        edition.
        Aniela - N.Z.

        --- In Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com, Zbigniew Bob Styrna
        <styrna@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Aneta,
        >
        >
        >
        > Jak sie masz ?
        >
        >
        >
        > Thank you for sharing this important Anniversary with us/me. God
        only knows
        > how horrible it must have been for the people back then.
        >
        >
        >
        > I know a little about Powazki Cmentarz. My father's brother,
        Stanislaw
        > Styrna ( because if Russian translation , they spelled it Sterna)
        is buried
        > there. All I have is this note my father left behind when he
        passed away:
        >
        >
        >
        > " Odnalazlem pomnik swojego braciszka na cmentarzu w srod oficerow
        i
        > polkownikow i generalow na Powazkach w Warszawie. Walczyl w
        Warszawie w
        > Pierwszej Dywizj Wojska Polskiego 1944 roku w inwazj "
        >
        >
        >
        > He was killed in Pludy near Kastelu. Not sure where or what that
        is. But
        > he ended up in this Army Cemetary in Warszawa near some Generals
        and
        > officers.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Nazdrowie
        >
        >
        >
        > Zbigniew
        >
        >
        >
        > Vancouver , Canada
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Kresy-
        Siberia@yahoogroups .com]
        > On Behalf Of Aneta Hoffmann
        > Sent: August 3, 2007 3:51 PM
        > To: Kresy-Siberia@ yahoogroups. com
        > Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Anniversary of Warsaw Uprising
        >
        >
        >
        > Dear All,
        > thank you very much for your response on my post conc. celebration
        of
        > the Warsaw Uprising anniversary - for your reaction and
        > understanding.
        >
        > In Warsaw as each year - whole city stopped for 1 minute at 5 pm
        on 1
        > August - cars stopped, people get off from them, pedestrians were
        > standing as well, even people in trams and buses stand up. Many
        > candles were ligthened on Powazki Military Cemetery on the graves
        of
        > uprising's soldiers as well near Warsaw Uprising monument and at
        > every place the soldiers were fighting the most... Warsaw
        remembers.
        >
        > Warmest regards,
        >
        > Aneta Hoffmann
        > Warsaw, Poland
        >



        Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.


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      • MICHELLE CAMPBELL
        In regards to this book, I hold it dear to my own heart, as if it were not for this amazing woman, my great grandmother would not have survived Ravensbruck. At
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 5, 2007
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          In regards to this book, I hold it dear to my own heart, as if it were not for this amazing woman, my great grandmother would not have survived Ravensbruck.  At 64 she was one of the few women to make the final march. She was with Lanckaronska in the prison, and my grandmother wrote to her from the hospital in  Sweden, when she was liberated. 

          They were both members of the Polish underground, and my grandmother was a Scout leader who ran one of the newspapaers in Ravensbruck. Lanckaroska helped her with stationery etc as she was in a position to do so.  Lanckaronska or 'princess' as she was known in Ravensbruck hid my grandmother twice when she was up for selektion. Once behind lice infested mattreses due for incineration and once in the rafters.  Pflaum (an ss guard) was shooting through the ceiling and actually hit my great grandmother twice in the leg, she did not cry out once.

          In her court testimonies she told of high regard for this amazing woman who tended to all the 'rabbits' those who endured medical experiments.

          I tried to contact this amazing woman before she died, but sadly my efforts were in vain.  Something I will always feel sad about.

          Michelle

           

           



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